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January 2, 1950 



■|pHIS IS a report on a Congress 
■ which should have been better. 

The record of Congress isn’t better 
because a Republican-Dixiecrat coali- 
tion had control in many key votes. 

The first session of the 81st Con- 
gress was a vast improvement over 
the “awful 80th.” It passed a long- 
sought housing program. It lifted 
minimum wages from 40c an hour to 
75c. It extended rent control — though 
not nearly in strong enough form. 

. On foreign affairs, Congress worked 
effectively. It extended the European 
Recovery Program with sufficient 
funds to carry on our works of eco- 
nomic recovery. 

It endorsed the Atlantic Pact to 
strengthen the democratic nations, 
and approved a military aid program 
to help the democracies protect them- 
selves against^aggression. It extended 
and improved the reciprocal trade act, 
to help promote international com- 
merce and stability. 

The 81st Congress made a start on 
many other elements of the Fair Deal 
program. The House passed a vastly 
improved social security bill, an anti- 
trust' measure, a liberalized bill for 
displaced persons. The Senate en- 
dorsed a workable aid-to-education 
bill and approved a plan for home rule 
for the nation’s capital. 

Taft-Hartley Remains 

BUT— and it’s a big BUT— the 81st 
Congress fell down on the job on many 
issues. 

First and foremost, it failed to re- 
peal the anti-labor Taft-Hartley Act— 
although T-H repeal had been a basic 
plank in the winning Democratic plat- 
form of 1948. Repeal of Taft-Hartley 


Joint Effort 

Material for this 1949 CIO News 
Voting Record was prepared by the 
CIO Legislative Department, the 
CIO Publicity Department and the 
CIO Political Action Committee. 

A 1950 Voting Record will be 
issued next summer, after Congress 
adjourns. It will contain the final 
record of the 81st Congress, and 
will be available in time for the 1950 
campaign. 



PHILIP MURRAY 


must have a Congress respon^ 
sive to the will of the majority of the 
people — a Congress that will work 
earnestly for better conditions for all 
our people” 

remains a prime goal of organized 
labor. 

The first session of the 81st Congress 
shied away from action on the Presi- 
dent’s Civil Rights program. That 
stalling and delay were in large part 
due to potent pressure from conserva- 
tive southern Democrats and their 
allies in the leadership of the Repub- 
lican party. 

Hope of clearing the log- jam of 
civil rights legislation quickly and 
effectively lay in proposals for chang- 
ing the Senate rules — for those rules 
have favored the filibuster, and the 
filibuster has been the weapon of de- 
feat for every civil rights bill. 

Help For Filibuster 

The southern polltaxers filibustered 
against liberalizing the Senate rules, 
and most Republicans — despite fine 
campaign promises — aided and abetted 
that filibuster. The Dixie-gop coali- 
tion won the round, a victory which 
makes more difficult the closing of 
debate in the upper branch of Con- 
gress. 

Republican aid in that fight was ap- 
preciated by the Dixiecrats, and 


throughout the session they paid back 
— in terms of opposition to many of 
the Fair Deal measures proposed by 
President Truman and supported by 
labor. 

The coalition worked to pare down 
improvements in the wage-hour law, 
to provide serious weakness in the rent 
control act, to hamstring action on 
such projects as the Columbia Valley 
Authority and to snarl up an anti- 
monopoly campaign designed to break 
up soak - the - consumer agreements 
among big corporations. 

1950 Is Crucial 

The second session of the 81st Con- 
gress has a golden opportunity to im- 
prove its record and to enact a sub- 
stantial portion of the program for 
which the people voted in 1948. 

The eyes of union members and of 
the public will be focused on Congress 
during the months ahead — and the 
record will be remembered in the cru- 
cial elections of 1950. 

Now, about this 1949 Voting Record. 


how your Congressman or Senator 
acted in Committee or behind the 
scenes. It does not show whether he 
was energetic or lazy ; whether he 
voted “right” from conviction or for 
the record. 

Your Decisions 

Despite what newspapers or colum- 
nists say, this is neither a “black list” 
nor a “white list” nor a series of “en- 
dorsements” for re-election. 

Endorsements are made by CIO 
unions and their Political Action Com- 
mittees in each state and Congressional 
district. Those decisions are in the 
hands of the folks back home. 

Part of that decision will be based 
on the voting record of the 96 Senators 
and 435 members of the House. 

And it’s easy to predict that labor’s 
approval is more apt to go to the 14 
Senators and 111 Representatives who 
cast no “wrong” votes, than to the 
three Senators and the 28 Representa- 
tives who cast no “right” votes. 


It is designed to help you understand 
how your Senators and Congressmen 
have voted on a series of key tests 
in both the Senate and the House of 
Representatives. 

But the Voting Record tells only 
part of the story. It does not show 


Study this record of your Congress- 
man and Senators; give your dollar 
to PAC; make sure you’re registered 
to vote. And in the 1950 elections you 
can help insure continued legislative 
action for progressive government- 
government that will be alert to your 
problem. 


THE CIO NEWS 
1949 VOTING RECORD 

This special 8-page supplement is being printed as a 
separate CIO publication, for distribution among union 
members throughout the country. 

Prices for the 1949 Voting Record: 

5c a copy; 50 for $2.00; 100 for $3.50 
500 for $14; 1,000 for $20 

Send your orders for the 1949 Voting Record (CIO Pub- 
lication No. 179), together with check or money order, 

to: 

Publications Department 
Congress of Industrial Organizations 
718 Jackson Place N. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 




SENATE’S 1 

Here’s a short description of each of the 16 votes on the 
opposite page. Read these descriptions of the issues— 
then see how your Senator voted. 

1. T-H REPEAL — ^^LUCAS AMENDMENT (Supported by cio) 

ISSUE: This was an Administration effort to knock anti-union injunction 

proyisions out of Sen. Taft's new T-H bill on so-called national 
emergencies. Sen. Lucas’ amendment met united labor’s demands 
for an end to injunctions against unions. It was defeated. 


VOTE: To pass the Lucas amendment 44 (R) 

To defeat the Lucas amendment 46 (W) 

DATE: June 28, 1949. 


RESULT: Republican-Dixicrat coalition, encouraged by victory, went on to 
pass other Taft white-wash “amendments” to Taft-Hartley, and to 
scuttle repeal of Taft-Hartley. 

2. T-H — ^TAFT INJUNCTION PLAN (Opposed by ao) 

ISSUE; Taft’s new language covering so-called national emergency injunc- 
tions left this phase of Taft-Hartley Act virtually unchanged in 
terms of anti-labor intent. It gave new Congressional endorsement 
to-injunctions against unions. Taft bill permitted U. S, seizure of 
struck plants — but no seizure of profits. Taft bill passed. 


VOTE; To pass the Taft injunction amendment 50 4W) 

To defeat the Taft injunction amendment 40 <R) 

DATE: June 28, 1949. 


RESULT; Drastic anti-labor national emergency injunction of Taft-Hartley 
was kept in Senate-passed bill. 

3. T-H TAFT ‘PACKAGE’ (Opposed by CIO) 

ISSUE; This amendment, with few minor changes in language, re-endorsed 
all of Taft-Hartley Act. Its passage spelled end of hope of repealing 


T-H during first session of 81st Congress. 

VOTE: To pass the Taft “package” amendment 49 (W) 

To defeat the Taft “package” amendment 44 (R) 

DATE; June 30, 1949. 


RESULT: Passage of this amendment, confirming Taft-Hartley Act, ended 
fight for repeal of anti-labor law in first session of 81st Congress. 

4. MINIMUM WAGE — ELLENDER AMDT. (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: This was key Senate test in labor’s fight to lift U. S. minimum 

wages from 40 to 75c an hour. Sen. Ellender (D.La.) proposed only 
a 65c minimum, which would rise and fall with changes in cost of 
living. Proposal under-cut whole idea of steady floor under wages. 


Defeated. 

VOTE: To pass Ellender “flexible-65c” minimum 26 (W) 

To defeat Ellender amendment 51 (R) 

DATE: August 31, 1949. 


RESULT; Defeat of this and other hobbling amendments paved way for final 
passage of improved 75c minimum wage law. 

5. PUBLIC POWER FUNDS (Supported by CIO) 

ISSUE: Friends of private utilities lobby tried to cut Dept, of Interipr Ap- 

propriation — in order to eliminate funds for building of power 
transmission lines from government-owned dams in various sec- 
tions of the country. It would have set back government’s program 
for cheap power. Amendment was defeated. 

VOTE: To keep appropriation for public power lines.... 45 (R) 

To eliminate funds for public power lines 38 (W) 

DATE: August 23, 1949. 

RESULT; Government’s ppwerline program was continued, over objections 
of one of Washington’s most potent lobbies. 

6. CONFIRMATION OF LELAND OLDS (Supported by cio) 

ISSUE; Leland Olds, member of the Federal Power Commission for 10 
years, was reappointed for another five-year term by Pres. Tru- 
man. But private power lobby, objecting to Olds’ effort to regulate 
oil and natural gas rates in interest of public, fought hard with 
red herrings and smear stories. Olds lost Senate confirmation. 

VOTE; To confirm Leland Olds to Federal Power Commission.... 16 (R) 

To refuse confirmation of Leland Olds 53 (W) 

DATE: October 12, 1949. 

RESULT: Private business interests won fight for less militant Federal Power 
Commission regulation of natural gas rates, etc. 

7. RENT CONTROL — FULBRIGHT AMDT. (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: This amendment — sponsored by Sen. Fulbright (D.Ark.) — was 

heartily supported by real estate lobby as method of weakening 
rent control. It permitted local authorities to abolish rent control 
in any area with approval of state governor. At issue was principle 
of continued strong national rent control. Amendment passed. 


VOTE; To approve Fulbright amendment 45 (W) 

To defeat Fulbright amendment 36 (R) 

DATE: March 22, 1949. 


RESULT; Passage of amendment contributed heavily to weakening of rent 
control structure, and helped trend toward widespread lifting of 
needed controls on rents. 

8. PUBLIC HOUSING — BRICKER AMDT. (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE; Poes of slum clearance and good low-rent housing tried to gut th* 
public' housing bill before it was finally passed by Congress. One 
of the strongest amendments was proposed by Sen. Bricker (R.O.); 
it would have removed all provisions for low-rent public housing 
and for rural housing programs. Amendment was defeated. 

VOTE; For the Bricker amendment to kill public housing .... 19 (W) 
Against the Bricker amendment 58 (R) 

DATE; April 21, 1949. 

RESULT: Public housing bill, generally in form proposed by Administration 
and supported by labor, became law — after several years’ debate. 

THE CIO NEWS 1949 VOTuSg RECORD TV 


ECO 

9. HOUSING — TAFT AMENDMENT (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: Sen. Taft’s . amendment to housing bill would have cut out most 

benefits to farmers, by forbidding loans under the bill to farmers 
for minor farm improvements. Amendment was defeated. 


VOTE; For the Taft hobbling amendment 80 (W) 

Against the amendment 41 (R) 

DATE; April 21,* 1949. 


RESULT: Defeat of Taft amendment paved way for final passage of bill in 
form supported by Administration, labor and other groups. 

10. 10®/o BUDGET CUT (Opposed by CIO) 

ISSUE: Sen. McClellan (D.Ark.) proposed suspension of Senate rules in 

order to offer amendment to appropriation bill. His plan — to order 
the President to cut federal spending appropriations by 5% to 10%. 
Move was design to “put the President on the spot” and would 
have hurt administration of vital government services. Defeated. 

VOTE: For the McClellan motion to suspend Senate rules.... 49 (W) 

Against McClellan motion 28 (R) 

DATE; August 29, 1949. 

RESULT: Motion — supported by southern Democrats and many Republicans 
—failed to carry; it lacked the two-thirds majority necessary for 
suspension of rules. 

11. ANTI-FILIBUSTER RULING (Supported by CIO) 

ISSUE: Southern Democrats, abetted by many Republicans, launched fili- 

buster against Administration efforts to modernize Senate debating 
rules. Vice Pres. Barkley ruled that petition of 33 Senators, seek- 
ing to halt that filibuster, was valid. Test came on filibusterers’ 
appeal from Barkley’s highly important ruling. 

VOTE; To uphold Barkley, curb filibusters 41 (R) 

To over-rule Barkley, retain filibuster power.... 46 (W) 

DATE: March 11, 1949, 

RESULT: Major effort to win lasting reform in Senate rules and prevent fili- 
busters, was defeated# 

12. SENATE RULES— WHERRY PLAN (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE; Following conservatives’ victory on filibuster issue. Sen. Wherry 
(R.Nebr.) offered weak changes to Senate rules in behalf of south- 
ern Democrat-GOP coalition. It extended cloture (ending of de- 
bate) to subjects not previously covered — but permits endless de- 
bate on future proposed rules changes, and permits cloture only on 
approval of 64 Senators. Wherry proposal was passed. 


VOTE; For the Wherry rules proposal 63 (W) 

Against the Wherry rules proposal 23 (R) 

DATE: March 17, 1949. 


RESULT: Power of filibuster bloc was increased by Wherry proposals— and 
future limitation of filibuster power was made more difficult. 

13. TRADE PACTS — MILLIKIN AMDT. (Opposed by aoj 

ISSUE: ""Amendment of Sen. Millikin (R.Colo.) was most serious of several 
efforts to weaken government’s effort to spur international trade. 
It would have cut extension of power to negotiate trade agree- 
ments from three to two years, and through “peril point” formula 
sought to cripple trade past program. Amendment was defeated. 


VOTE; To adopt Millikin’s weakening amendment 38 (W) 

To defeat Millikin's amendment 43 (R) 

DATE; September 15, 1949. 


RESULT: With Millikin amendment defeated. Congress went on to extend 
Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act along lines sought by CIO. 

14. EGA — TAFT-RUSSELL AMENDMENT (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: Isolationists and anti-Fair Dealers joined in support of this amend- 

ment, which would have trimmed second year fund authorization 
for Economic Cooperation Administration by flat 10%. Cut would 
- have seriously weakened ERP. Amendment was defeated. 


VOTE: For Taft-Russell “10% cut” amendment 23 (W) 

Against Taft-Russell amendment 54 (R) 

DATE; April 1, 1949. 


RESULT: Congress went on to pass generally acceptable appropriation for 
second, year of European Recovery Program. 

15. MILITARY AID PROGRAM (Supported by CIO) 

ISSUE: Armaments aid program was proposed to back up North Atlantic 

Pact, and to give western European democracies help in building 
defenses against possible aggression. Program was adopted. 

VOTE: For military aid program 55 (R) 

Against military aid progi^m 24 (W) 

DATE: Sept. 22, 1949. 

RESULT: With passage of arms aid program, U. S. moved forward to imple- 
ment western European defenses outlined by North Atlantic Pact. 

16. DISPLACED PERSONS — DELAY (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: Bill— supported by CIO— to liberalize immigration of European 

displaced persons, and to remove discriminatory features in 1948 
act, was held up for months. Finally reported out. Senators Cain 
(R., Wash.) and Eastland (D., Miss.) offered amendment returning 
bill to committee for “further study.” Amendment was passed. 

VOTE: For the Cain-Eastland delay amendment 36 (W) 

Against the Cain-Eastland amendment 80 (R) 

DATE: Odtober 15, 1949. 

RESULTS Action to liberalize DP law was stalled at least until Jan., 1950. 




2 


I 


It Was Christmas— But Their Daddy Wasn’t There 


By AL ZACK 

This is a time table of death — sudden death. 

This is why two little youngsters in Steubenville, Ohio, 
had a bewildering Christmas — a Christmas without their 
father. 

This is a story of a big steel corporation that repeatedly 
i^ored pleas of the union to eliminate a dangerous working 
condition. 

This is the story from the official records. 

Early 1949 — Steelworkers Local Union 1190, through its 
members on the labor-management safety committee 'pf 
Wheeling Steel Corp., entered a protest against flue dust 
pouring from the huge blast furnaces at the Mingo Junction 
plant which was creating a dangerous situation. Unbelievably 
heavy, the flue dust, composed of 60% iron ore, was settling 
on the roofs of the plants. It was particularly dangerous at 
the South Division, the union charged. 

Spring of 1949 — ^The union continued to protest. The pile 
of flue dust was more than eight inches high on the South 
Division plant — structural steel building with a brick cur- 
tain wall and steel span roof, built in 1899 and expanded 
in 1905. 

THE FOLLOWING QUOTES are from photostatic copies 
■ of the minutes of the labor-management meeting: 

April 11, 1949 — ^‘The safety representative was asked to 
report to the general safety committee meeting the danger 
existing because of the great amount of flue dust lying upon 
some of the roofs at South Division.” 

April 13, 1949 — “The situation of large amounts of flue 
dust on roofs was to be reported to general safety meeting, 
but due to the fact our representative did not attend 
last meeting of the committee, this item was referred to the 
next meeting.” 

May 16, 1949 — “Reported that accumulation of flue dust 
on roofs is very bad.” 



May 26, 1949 — “It was reported that flue dust on roofs 
of buildings continues to accumulate, and is now higher since 
reported at last meeting.” 

June 8, 1949 — “Reported that situation of flue dust on 
roofs remains the same with the exception that more has 
accumulated.” 

(Throughout the summer and fall, the union continued 
to protest. The flue dust continued to accumulate. By early 
December, the flue dust on South Division roof measured 
14 inches.) 

December 11, 1949 — ^At about 6:30 p.m., 160. square feet 
of roof at the South Division plant broke loose and tumbled 
to the floor 45 feet below, with a terrific roar, 
s 

IJESCUE SQUADS, guided by a flashlight that continued 
to burn under the tons of debris, found Ralph DeBacco, 
a 40-year-old motor inspector, and rushed him to the hos- 


pital. DeBacco sustained a fractured leg and internal injuries. 
But he will live, the doctor said. 

The rescue squads continued their work. Four hours later 
they found the body of John Stoddard, 45, a blowing-room 
engineer. 

Stoddard had died of suffocation. 

Two other employes, working near the entrance to the 
blowing room, escaped uninjured. 

December 19, 1949 — Union members of the Safety Com- 
mittee found that the flue dust on the fbof of an adjoining 
building was 13 inches deep. 

“I don’t know the legal difference between unpremedi- 
tated death and murder,” said Frank Smith, Chairman of 
Steel Local 1190’3 Safety Committee. 

“But I do know that this was a needless and wanton waste 
of human life. 

“The Wheeling Steel Corporation, by disregarding our re- 
peated pleas to guard the safety of their employes, has shown 
utter disregard for life and safety. 

“Only the fact that it was Sunday saved many other 
Steelworkers from serious injury or possible death. 

“Our Safety Committee, which includes Earl Rogers, 
David Dines, John Cifardone and Nello Amedi, has been 
instructed by the Local to push this investigation to a rapid 
satisfactory conclusion. 

- “We are demanding the state take appropriate action. 
Already, a state safety inspector has ordered the roofs of all 
the buildings cleaned to prevent another tragedy. 

“The Wheeling Steel Corp. had better mark this warning. 
We will nbver again permit them to so flagrantly disregard 
safety warnings from the labor-management committee. 

“The union, unlike the company, has a respect for the 
value of human life. We are determined that Wheeling 
Steel shall learn this humane philosophy. 

“There will never again be another death like this at 
Mingo Junction.” 


UAW Is sues Plan 
To Catch Plotters 


Labor Dept. Reports 

Unemployment Heavy In 12 Areas, 
Improvement Noted In 20 Others 


S OME improvement in the 
job situation in about 
half of the nation’s 32 areas 
of heavy unemployment be- 
tween September and October 
was noted by the U. S. Labor 
Dept.’s Bureau of Employ- 
ment Security. 

Bureau Dir. Robert C. Good- 
win reported the total number 
of jobless dropped in some 20 
of the heavy unemployment 
areas, while increases in total 
unemployment were found in 12 
sections. 

. Four of these areas showed an 
increase amounting to more than 
10%. These were Johnstown, Pa., 
Mount Vernon, and Crab Or- 
chard, 111., and Vincennes, Ind. 

Goodwin reported slight to 
moderate gains in 13 New Eng- 


land communities and one area 
in Pennsylvania. Cairo, 111., was 
the only city taken out of the 
“E” listing, the symbol used to 
designate areas of very substan- 
tial labor surplus. None were 
added to the “E” list. 

Reports from some areas not 
on the Dept, of Labor’s “E” list, 
however, indicate that the unem- 
ployment problem is reaching a 
critical stage. 

POR example,^ unemployment 
■ figures in the big industrial 
state of New York are reported 
to be running abnormally high. 
Preliminary estimates made pub- 
lic last week by the State Labor 
Dept.’s Division of Placement and 
Unemployment Insurance show 
that insurance payments to job- 
less workers in that state were 


almost times as large this 
year as last. 

Furthermore, more than 48,000 
workers have already drawn all 
the benefits they are entitled to 
receive for the “benefit year” that 
began last June. 

(As reported in the CIO News last 
week, the unemployed in several 
states have exhausted their unem- 
ployment benefits.) 

Michigan State and Washtenaw 
county X officials, -and representa- 
tives of labor, management, 
church, and social agencies, 
lasft week unanimously agreed at 
a meeting at Ypsilanti that thou- 
sands of destitute families are 
in need of immediate assistance. 

Secy.-Treas. Emil Mazey of 
the CIO Auto Workers said: 

“The UAW-CIO pledges its full 
support to a three-fold plan of 
action for Washtenaw County: 
declaring Washtenaw an emer- 
gency area to permit allocation 
of federal contracts to restore 
full employment; ending evic- 
tions from homes of all unem- 
ployed; and mobilizing full state 
an^ county resources to meet cur- 
rent welfare needs.” 

^HE areas where the Labor 
■ Dept.’s Employment Security 
Bureau found jobs to be very 
scarce as of Nov. 30, 1949, were: 

Alabama, Jasper; Connecticut, 
Ansonia, Bridgeport, Bristol, Dan- 
ielson, Meriden, New Britain, 
New London-Groton and Water- 
bury; Illinois, Crab Orchard and 
Mt. Vernon; Indiana, Terre 
Haute and Vincennes. 

Maine, Biddeford - Sanford; 
Maryland, Cumberland ; Massa- 
chusetts, Fall River, Fitchburg, 
Lawrence, Lpwell, New Bedford 
and Worcester; Michigan, Muske- 
gon; New York, Utica-Rome; 
Pennsylvania, Altoona, Greens- 
burg, Johnstown, Pottsville, 
Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. 

Rhode Island, Providence; Ten- 
nessee, Knoxville; Hawaii, Hono- 
lulu. 

N 


W ITH Detroit police ap- 
parently unable to uYi- 
cover any worthwhile clues in 
the attempted dynamiting of 
CIO Auto Workers headquar- 
ters two weeks ago, Sec.- 
Treas. Emil Mazey issued a 
'^secret witness” plan for per- 
sons who have important in- 
formation but wish to conceal 
their identity. 

Mazey said UAW reward 
money, which now totals $225,- 
000, would be paid for informa- 
tion leading to the arrest and 
conviction of the person or per- 
sons responsible for the attempt- 
ed assassination of UAW Pres. 
Walter P. Reuther, his brother, 
Victor, the union’s educational 
director, and the effort to blow 
up the UAW building. Mazey said: 

“Any person who has informa- 
tion he believes will contribute 


to the solution of any or all of 
the three crimes; and who, for 
any reason does not wish to be 
known, should type or print his 
information on a plain white 
paper. He should state all the 
known facts — names, places and 
times — as accurately as possible. 

“On the last page he should 
print or type a number, chosen 
at random, of not less than six 
figures, such as 748593. A corner, 
should be torn from that page 
in a jagged line and the same 
number written on this piece.” 

The information should then 
be mailed in a plain envelope, to 
UAW-CIO, Post Office Box 1714, 
Detroit, Mich. 

Mazey said that if any such 
information received makes the 
informant eligible for the reward, 
UAM will make public through 
the press and radio the number 
associated with the letter of in- 
formation. 



DOESN’T ‘‘SCARE EASY”: That was the comment of Pres. 
Joseph Curran of the CIO Natl. Maritime Union (above), who 
is looking at the threat that was painted on the door of his 
gemage at Franklin Square, N. Y. 



FOUND “YULE” BOMB: Frank Krajnik (1.), and George 
Thomas, maintenance man and night watchman, respectively, 
at the CIO Auto Workers headquarters in Detroit, found the 
Christmas wrapped dynamite bomb outside the UAW offices. 

THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 2, 1960 ® 


/ 



The Two Eyes Of Our Congress 


Closely Focused On Legislative Proposals And The Other 


One Of Them Will Be 

By ALLAN L. SWIM 

B ICING POLITICIANS, members of 
the Congress which goes back into 
session this week will have one eye on 
tha legislative agenda and the other 
on the 1950 elections. 

This is as it should be. Senators and 
Ci;ngressmen are supposed to be subject to 
the will of the people as expressed at the 
polls. 

fes, they're supposed to be. The fact 
thiit a number of them aren’t means that 
PA^C and other labor political organizations 
huve a big job cut out for them this year. 

And as the votes are cast on Capitol 
Hill our lawmakers will be conscious of 
the fact that labor plans to turn out a big 
vote late in 1950. 

Ml LTHOUGH “pre-election fever" may 
cause some Congressmen and Senators 
to ease up a bit in their opposition to 
Fijir Deal measures it would be a mistake 
to expect any miracles. 

Labor abhors the Taft-Hartley Act as 
much as ever. There is every indication 
that President Truman still adh -res to his 
strong anti-T-H stand. 


But there’s nothing to indicate that a 
Taft - Hartley repealer can be pushed 
through Congress this year. 

Those who should know say that the 
votes just aren’t there. 

They say, too, that labor has a better 
chance to change lawmakers than to get 
current lawmakers to change their votes. 

This means T-H is likely to be a major 
campaign issue. 

And it’s an issue around which all of 
labor can rally. 

T here are many indications that the 
explosive Truman civil rights program 
will be tossed into the hopper early in 
the session. 

This should be done despite the fire- 
works that would result. 

It should be done because civil rights 
legislation is long overdue— because our 
nation has assumed a position of leader- 
ship which requires us to set outstandifig 
examples in democracy. 

Suppose the Dixiecrats stage a filibuster. 
There have been filibusters before. 

'^Suppose FEPC, poll tax and anti-lynch 


proposals make some of the Congressmen 
and Senators squirm. They’ve squirmed 
over uncomfortable issues before. 

And suppose the Administration fails to 
push its program through. It has failed 
to obtain other things it sought. 

The groups which suffer from discrimi-- 
nation because of race, creed or color 
deserve to see their friends make a good 
fight:- 

And those who oppose strengthened 
civil rights deserve to be put on record. 

C ONGRESS COULD well afford to dive 
right into the middle of the contro- 
very over federal health insurance. 

Few issues in recent years have been so 
distorted. The insurance plan has been 
falsely called “socialized medicine,’’ “gov- 
ernment medicine" and “bureaucratic med- 
icine." 

In an attempt to ' prevent compulsory 
health insurance, the American Medical 
Association has flooded the country with 
disgustingly phony propaganda. 

A few smart, straight-tiiinking law- 
makers could do much to cle.ar up the 
misconceptions, to counteract the AMA 


On The 1950 Elecfbns 

propaganda and at least give the public 
an opportunity to make up its mind on 
the basis of facts. 

This in itself would be a worthwhile 
contribution— even if insurance legislation 
should be defeated. 

I T WOULD be foolish at this point to 
predict that a major portion of the Fair 
Deal program will have been enacted into 
law by the time the fall elections arrive. 

It would be equally foolish to predict 
that the Fair Deal is stymied and that 
progress won’t be made. 

Despite predictions — anybody’s predic- 
tions — about what Congress may do, one 
thing is certain: 

Labor has a big political job on its 
hands this year — and it’s an important job 
that can’t be shirked. 

Some CIO Political Action Committees 
already have made their plans for ’50. 
Others are getting ready to square away 
for the battle. 

Both money and “elbow grease” will be 
needed. And there’s no better time than 
now to give a buck to PAC and to begin 
limbering up those door - bell pushing 
fingers. 


Labor’s Monopoly 

The sloganeers of organized industry are at it again and 
this time their pet phrase is ‘'Organized labor is a monopoly.” 

It’iS a neat phrase — one that slips off the tongue easily at 
Rotary and Kiwanis Club meetings. It looks good in print, too, 
to those who don’t want to play fair with the unions. 

The fact that it’s phony doesn’t seem to bother those who 
use it. 

But it irks those who know arid belieye in the labor move- 
ment. Among the irked is the Cleveland Union Leader, which 
goes a bit further than merely saying “phooey!” 

“Labor too long has had a monopoly over many things, but 
surely never a monopoly on members’ jobs,” says the Union 
Leader, 

“Labor still has a m.onopoly on all of the ramshackle houses 
in the slums of our great cities . . . Labor has a monopoly on 
the wards of too many unkempt charity hospitals.” 

Labor, the Union Leader declares, has a monopoly or near- 
monopoly on inadequate medical treatment, on fear of unem- 
ployment, and on “a million ‘tin lizzies’ that will be paid for ir 
three years if not attached because a few installments cannot 
be met.” 

Organized labor, the paper concludes, “is not now, never 
has been nor ever will be monopolistic.” 

All of which leads us to conclude: 

Labor would be most happy for somebody to break the 
monopolies it has on the bad things our society produces. 

And it would be equally happy if somebody would crack 
down on the business monopolies which stifle competition. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii^ 



Congress of Industrial Organizations 


Philip Murray, President James B. Carey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vice Presidents; Joseph A. Beirne, L. S. Buckmaster, Joseph Curran, 
John Green, Allan S. Haywood, O. A. Knight, Walter P. 
Reuther, Emil Rieve, Frank Rosenblum. 

Allan L Swim, Editor and Publicity Director 

Assistant Publicity Director: Henry C. Fleisher 
Assistant Editors: Hollace Ransdell, Fred Ross, Arthur Riordan, (On Leave), 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark, William Weiss 
Business Manager: Richard E. Bauer 

Editorial Office, 718 Jackson Place, N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Entered as Second Class Matter, Post Office, Washington, D. C. 

Under the Act of Aug. 24, 1912 and Feb 28. 1925. 

Vol. XIII January 2, 1950 No. 1 

^ THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 2, 1960 J 


Are Physicians Losing People's Respect? 


The fear that the Hippocratic 
oath of the medical profession 
may become “a curse on the lips 
of those who can^t afford to keep 
welV is expressed in this editorial 
from Kenosha (Wis.) Labor: 

I T IS A FAR cry from the Hippo- 
cratic oath under which doctors 
swear they will do everything in 

Polio Fund 
Dwindliiig 

AN APPEAL to CIO members 
^ to give unstinted support to 
the forthcoming March of Dimes 
drive (Jan. 16-31) has been issued 
by Pres. Philip Murray. 

Murray made his appeal in a 
letter to the various CIO affiliates 
in which he pointed out that the 
CIO has always rallied whole- 
heartedly behind the annual cam- 
paigns of the National Foundation 
for Infantile Paralysis. 

Noting that many members of 
the CIO had learned about the 
scourge of polio through bitter 
personal experience, Murray said 
he is sure that members of the 
CIO will respond as generously in 
this March of Dimes drive as they 
have done in the past. 

Because the nation was hit-in 1949 
by the worst polio epidemic in its 
history, with more than 41,000 
stricken, the National Foundation 
said it is asking everyone to give 
more than ever to the March of 
Dimes— to replenish the nearly de- 
pleted resources. 

Labor unions and affiliated or- 
ganizations have been requested 
by James J. Herkenham, Jr., the 
National Foundation’s Director of 
Labor Services, to make their con- 
tributions directly to the local Na- 
tional Foundation chapter in their 
vicinity. 

Egg Price Support Cut 

* The Agriculture Dept, has an- 
nounced it will support farm 
prices of eggs in 1950 at an aver- 
age of 37c a dozen, 8c below this 
year. Officials said that should 
bring retail prices down 8 to 10c, 
and hopes consumers will use any 
such saving in buying more eggs. 
'^Otherwise Uncle Sam will have to 
buy up more, and he already has 
on hand 2,500,000,000. ^ 


their power and knowledge to This view is badly expressed 
help the sick, to the American by the New York State Journal 


Medical Association’s rejection of of Medicine which says “We read- 


and opposition to all federal pro- 
grams for medical care. 

Not satisfied with going on rec- 
ord against the Truman health 
plan and the Douglas compromise 
for catastrophic medical aid, th^ 
AMA House of Delegates has 
voted a $25 compulsory assess- 
ment on each and every American 
doctor in an effort to raise $3 mil- 
lion for its propaganda and lobby- 
ing campaign against federal pro- 
grams. 

T hese federal programs include 
not only attempts to bring ade- 
quate medical care to the needy 
but also aids to medical education, 
grants for building medical school 
facilities and voluntary consumer 
organized health plans. To all of 
these programs the AMA has 
turned thumbs down and has at- 
tempted to smear the projects 
with “socialism." 

If one adds to their opposition 
their attitude of preventing DP 
(displaced persons) doctors from 
practicing here, the ordinary lay- 
man gets the uncomfortable feel- 
ing that the American doctor, as 
a group, is far more interested in 
retaining his comfortable status 
quo than in expanding medical 
facilities. 


ily admit that under (the present 
system) a certain number of cases 
of early tuberculosis and cancer, 
for example, may go undetected.' 
Is it not better that a few should 
perish than that the majority of 
the population should be encour- 
aged bn every occasion to run 
sniveling to the doctor?" 

On the matter of the $25 com- 
pulsory assessment, it doesn’t take 
much to imagine how the com- 
mercial press would view an as- 
sessment if the AMA were a labor 
union or how long it would be 
before the Taft-Hartley Act would 
be flung at the offenders. 

Certainly this act by the AMA 
should spotlight the inequity of 
the T-H shackles on Labor’s cam- 
paign efforts against anti-labor 
congressmen. 

The AMA has made its position 
clear: Medical care must remain 
a tight monopoly, without regard 
to the needs of public health and 
safety — even at the heavy cost of 
reducing this once-honorable pro- 
fessional body to a mere political 
pressure group. 

The oath of Hippocrates might 
well become a curse on the lips 
of those who can’t afford to keep 
well. 



WSSICiT 

coii^i^ii£s$ or 
i«4by ATRIAL 
OROANiZAfiOfIS 

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5c c 


WASHINGTON. D. C., JANUARY 2. 1950 No. I 









I T WAS A BI(? year for labor in 
America — and there was something 
doing almost every day in the realm of 
union affairs. 

1949 was the year of big pension vic- 
tories — and the year that Taft-Hartley 
didn't get repealed. It was the year 
that resistance to ^Communist infiltra- 
tion in unions mounted toward a dra- 
matic climax^and that economic re- 
cession sent unemployment to post-war 
highs. 

JANUARY 1949 was a month of 
bustle, wonder and hope. The new 
81st Congress came to Washington; 
there was talk of ‘TOO days” of legis- 
lation like the New Deal of FDR in 



1933. President Truman spelled out 
his Fair Deal in a fighting State-of- 
the-Union speech — a speech heartily 
approved by labor. But the Dixiegop 
coalition on Capitol Hill settled down 
for a long, hard fight — and Congress 
moved slowly. 

In Paris, CIO's Secy.rTreas. Jim 
Carey, with other democratic union 
leaders, walked out of the World Fed- 
eration of Trade Unions. They charged 
it was completely Communist-domi- 
nated — and began to rally strength for 
a new international body controlled by. 
labor unions alone. 

FEBRUARY found the battle for 
Taft-Hartley repeal in full swing, with 
unions supporting Thomas - Lesinski 
Bill. By month’s end, labor was wor- 
ried by legislative delays on T-H repeal 
and other Fair Deal issues. 

Several big CIO unions started draft- 
ing contract demands — and talked in- 
creasingly of need for pensions. 

MARCH was the month of question- 
naires — from Uncle Sam’s income tax 


collectors and from corporation propa- 
ganda agencies. Millions of citizens 
were asked to tell how they felt about 
labor laws — in questions that could be 
answered only in favor of Taft-Hart- 
ley. But Dr. William Leiserson, labor 
relations expert, gave Senators a bet- 
ter answer. He testified at Senate 
hearings: ‘T just think T-H is no 
good.” 

Congress passed a Swiss-cheese rent 
control law — and CIO economists be- 
gan to warn that growing unemploy- 
ment was a real danger signal. 

Senators and Congressmen went 
home for Easter vacations during 
APRIL — and heard plenty of com- 
plaints about lack of progress from 
folks back home. Rep. Wood of 
Georgia came up with his new labor 
bill — promptly called a chip off the 
T-H block. 

In MAY, Congressmen passed the 
anti-labor Wood Bill, 217-203 — then, in 
next-day reversal, recommitted it to a 
deep-freeze, 212-209. But T-H repeal 
in House was dead for the session. 

CIO Board, moved sharply against 
left-wingers. It censured Mine Mill & 
Smelter Workers for smear campaign 
against CIO and Pres. Murray ; ordered 
Farm Equipment Workers to merge 
with auto union; and called for resig- 
nation from the Board of members 
“unwilling” to follow CIO policy. 

A big union — Communications 
Workers of America — was both willing 
apd able to affiliate with CIO. It did 
so after a referendum among more 
than quarter-million members showed 
huge majority favoring CIO. 

And in New York, unions gave 
strong support to a fellow running for 


Congress, Mr. Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
Jr. 

JUNE saw the steel union reminding 
U. S. Steel that the big, profitable cor- 
poration was “morally, legally, con- 
tractually” obliged to bargain over 
pensions. CIO warned its members of 
a series of sugar-coated “amendments” 
designed to “improve” Taft-Hartley; 
the “amendments” were sponsored by 
■ — of all people — Sen. Robert A. Taft 
of Ohio. Their “one purpose: to main- 
tain all the essential features of the in- 
famous T-H Act.” 

In JULY th'e Dixiegop coalition 
passed the Taft T-H “amendments.” 
But anti-T-H votes had about doubled 
in two years. Steel union-management 
dispute over pensions, welfare and 
wages went to a Presidential Fact- 
Finding Board, while companies 
screamed “statism.” 

Sen. Robert Wagner of New York, 
father of the Wagner Act and a great 
liberal, resigned from office after two 
years of serious illness. And Van A. 
Bittner, a founding father of the CIO 
and head of southern organizing drive, 
died after long period of poor health. 

AUGUST was hot. And in an air- 
conditioned room where steel fact-find- 
ing hearings were in session, argu- 
ments flew hot and heavy as union 
pressed for acceptance of demands. 
Employment increased — but many 
areas remained hard hit. CIO in Mich- 
igan asked for aid for many distressed 
areas. 

Labor Day, in SEPTEMBER, found 
CIO Pres. Murray charging that reces- 
sion was delivered “f.o.b. Wall Street.” 
Month ended when steel workers, 
angered by corporations’ turn-down of 
fact-finding recommendations for wel- 
fare and pension plans, walked out on 


strike — 550,000 of them. Henry Ford 
II, however, bowed to United Auto 
Workers’ $100-a-month pension de- 
mand, and Goodrich agreed to rubber 
union’s pension plea. . 

Congress finally adjourned in OCTO- 
BER, after months of Dixiegop ob- 
structionism. But the housing bill had 
become law, minimum wages had been 
raised from 40 to 75c an hour, and 
progress was made toward better so- 
cial security. On Oct. 31, a momentous 
CIO convention opened — and Bethle- 
hem Steel agreed to “free” pensions 
for workers of at least $100 a month. 

CIO’s 11th convention, in session 
during first week in NOVEMBER, took 



major steps against Communist-led 
groups. “Old UE” was expelled, and 
new, democratic lUE-CIO was char- 
tered. Farm Equipment union, its 
leaders having merged with UE, was 
also expelled. And CIO set up ma- 
chinery to oust other unions whose 
leadership follows Communist Party 
line rather than democratic labor prin- 
ciples. lUE-CIO, at end-of-month con- 
vention, reported membership of 230,- 
000 — and still growing. 

DECEMBER found the pension-for- 
workers trend growing. lUE won them 
at Philco; and clothing workers, who 
have had pensions for past few years, 
got increase to $100 a month. 

In London, CIO joined with scores 
of other non-Communist union groups 
— including AFL — in forming new 
Inti. Confederation of Free Trade 
Unions. 

And throughout America, with Con- 
gress preparing to return for an all- 
important session, unions mobilized to 
follow through on Fair Deal program. 



lUE Wins Court Battle 
For Phila, Local’s Funds 



PRE-HEARING HUDDLE: Local presidents of lUE-CIO locals 
at the General Motors electrical division get together with lUE 
counsel to plan their attack at the NLRB hearing in Dayton, 
Ohio. The lUE wants an early election to determine the bar- 
gaining agent, but UE is seeking to delay the poll. L. to r., 
Robert Eisner, Local 801, Dayton; Frank Murray, Local 509, 
Rochester, N. Y.; Sid Sayers, Local 717, Warren, Ohio; Jim 
Kraft, Local 755, Dayton; Harold Merell, Local 416, New Bruns- 
wick, N. J., and Ben Sigal, lUE-CIO attorney. 


Feh, 14 Tentative Date 
Of CIO Board Meeting 

Date of the next meeting of the CIO Executive Board has tenta- 
tively been set for Tuesday, February 14, by Pres. Philip Murray. 

The meeting will be held in the Board Room at CIO headquarters 
in Washington. 

Coming before the meeting will be reports from committees which 
are in process of conducting hearings on charges of Communist domina- 
tion, filed against the leadership of 10 unions. 

Hearings probably will have been held by Feb. 14 in the case of 
four unions. United Office & Professional Workers was given a hearing 
Dec. 19. Hearings are scheduled on Mine Mill & Smelter Workers Jan. 4 
and on Food, Tobacco & Agricultural Workers on Jan. 6. Hearings have 
not yet been scheduled on United Public Workers, but are likely to be 
held during January. 

Under constitutional changes made at the Clevelan d convention. 
Communist-dominated unions can be expelled from the CIO by the 
Executive Boafd, and nominees to the Board found to consistently 
follow Communist policies can be refused their seats. 


W HILE NLRB hearings 
were 'under way in 
Ohio, Pennsylvania and New 
York on the right-left wing 
fight for representation of the 
electrical workers. Judge 
Gerald F. Flood in Philadel- 
phia Common Pleas Court dis- 


missed an injunction to pre- 
vent lUE-CIO from obtaining 
the funds, of^ Local 119. 

In dismissing the injunction he 
pointed out that if lUE could 
sustain the charges made in the 
Cleveland convention that UE 
was Communist dominated, ‘‘the 
UE plaintiff would be prevented 


from receiving the relief of the 
courts.’^ 

Seven members of UE, claiming 
to represent the workers at the 
Philadelphia works of the Gen- 
eral Electric Co., filed the peti- 
tion after lUE contended it rep- 
resented the membership. 

J UDGE FLOOD also found that 
in his opinion UE was not 
acting in accordance with the 
local constitution when seven 
members called a meeting Nov. 
27 and ousted officers who had 
affiliated with lUE. Judge Flood 
said the seven members failed 
to serve 24 hours’ notice and 
notify the executive board in 
writing of the meeting. 

He further ruled out UE’s con- 
tention that under the constitu- 
tion UE members could not 
secede, dissolve, or disaffiliate. 
Judge Flood said the local con- 
stitution states that “the organ- 
ization shall be based upon ma- 
jority rule at all times.” 

•^HE NLRB hearing in Dayton, 
* Ohio, followed the same 
general pattern of delaying ac- 
tion instigated by UE in similar 
hearings. In an effort to speed 
the discussion, NLRB Trial Ex- 
aminer David Sacks ordered 
early in the hearings that at- 
torneys could object to his rul- 
ings but “could not give their 


reason for ^objecting unless given 
leave by the hearing officer.” 

The decision brought a storm 
of protests from UE attorney 
Martin Kurasch, who described 
the action as “undemocratic” and 
“depriving us of our rights.” 
Later the decision was reversed. 


Ben Sigal, lUE attorney, called 



Klan Probe Asked 
In Flint, Michigan 


Larry Huber, chairman of the 
Flint, Mich., PAG, has wired to 
Gov. Williams urging an immedi- 
ate investigation on the extent to 
which the KKK has infiltrated 
among county and state emploj^es. 
Huber acted after reports that 
many such employes are Klan 
members. 


repeatedly for action on the part 
of the hearing officer to bar 
“dilatory tactics” of the UE at- 
torneys. 

Jan. 11, 1950, has been set for 
filing briefs. 

The Sperry Gyroscope hearing 
at Lake Success, N. Y., entered 
its second week. Lateral issues 
that strayed from the main topic 
marked this fight of the right-left 
wing battle for representation of 
the electrical workers in the area. 

General Electric announced late 
last week that it would terminate 
its contract with UE upon the 
expiration of the pact April 1. 
Under the contract the extension 
of the contract after the exipra- 
tion date is automatic unless 
either the union on the company 
notifies the other of cancellation 
at least 90 days in advance. 


eWA Accepts^ Southwest Bell Hedges On Peace Formula 


T he CIO Communications 
Workers Division 20 has 
agreed to accept the recom- 
mendations of a committee 
composed of the Governors of 
six states in an effort to avoid 
a strike against Southwestern 
Bell Telephone. 

The governors on Dec. 29 met 
first with the union and later with 
the company. 

Afterwards the two groups were 
called together and offered the 
following proposals: 

I Representatives of Division 20 
* and the company would re- 
sume bargaining for a 15-day pe- 
riod in an attempt to reach agree- 
ment on the disputed issues. 

2 At the end of the 15^day pe- 
* riod, all unsettled items would 
be submitted to an im;pertial 
board of arbitrators. 

The union immediately accepted 
the proposals. The company ac- 
cepted the first part but refused 
to state whether or not it would 
arbitrate the unsettled items. 

“We may strike midnight, Dec. 
31, unless the co-mpany accepts 
the entire proposal,” « a union 
spokesman said. 

“We’ve done everything we 
could to avoid a strike,” he added. 
“The Governors and the U. S. 
Concilation Service have done all 
they could. Everyone has tried to 
settle the matter except the com- 
pany. Now it’s up to them.” 

Fifty thousand members of 
eWA’s huge southwestern Divi- 
sion 20 from Missouri, Kansas, 
Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas and 
Illinois hltd previously voted 4 to 1 
for a strike against the company. 

The strike vote was taken, ac- 
cording to a union spokesman, 
when negotiations, which began 
two months ago, broke down 
Dec. 23. 

The union agreed at a meeting 
called Dec. 23 by Gov. Smith to 
delay the strike 10 days. The 


state’s chief executive had threat- 
ened to invoke the King-Thomp- 
son Act if the workers did not 
agree to the postponement. 

The law, enacted in 1947 after 
a national 41-day strike, makes it 
illegal to support a utility strike 
in Missouri or refuse work for 
a state agency taking over a 
strike-bound utility. 

A UNION CALLING a utility 
strike or a utility bringing on 
a work stoppage by conducting a 
lockout, would forfeit $10,000 a 
day for each day of the stoppage, 
the money to be recovered by 
civil suit and paid to the public 
school fund of the state. 


Any union officer calling or 



Daniel Tobin 
Lauds Victory 
Of Steel Union 


Pres. Daniel J. Tobin of the 
AFL Teamsters, warmly congrat- 
ulated the CIO Steelworkers for 
their steel strike victory, in an 
interview at Pittsburgh. Said 
Tobin; 

“We congratulate the Steel- 
workers on their wonderful, 
brainy, diplomatic, strategic posi- 
\tion that they took during their 
strike. With patience, endurance 
and the highest kind of intelli- 
gence, based on experience, they 
were successful in winning for 
their many thousands of steel 
workers, one of the finest condi- 
tions for protection in sickness, 
distress or in old age or death 
that was ever obtained for a 
labor union in this or any other 
country. 

“A gain the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters de- 
sires to compliment them and 
congratulate them on what I 
• consider one of the outstanding 
achievements of organized labor 
in recent years.” 


participating in a strike would 
forfeit $1000. Strikers would lose 
their seniority and could be re- 
employed only as new workers. 

Smith’s action in calling the 
state heads together followed, a 
pattern set in the Missouri Pa- 
cific railroad dispute last October, 
when the governors of the affect- 
ed states succeeded in working 
out a formula which ended that 
46-day strike. The Missouri gov- 
ernor spearheaded that effort. 

The union had accused South- 
western Bell of following the 
union-busting pattern fostered by 
the parent company — the AT&T— 
in pre-strike vote bargaining ises- 
sions. 

It said the company had final- 
ly, after much stalling, completely 
turned down a union wage de- 
mand and that its attitude con- 
forms with Bell policy throughout 
the country. 

“The only offer Southwestern 
Bell has made,” a union source 
said, “has been to renew the con- 
tract without a wage reopener. It 
has refused to negotiate pension 
changes on the grourjds that its 
unilateral change should be sat- 
isfactory. It has refused to move 
on working conditions.” 

The union has made no specific 
wage demands but has indicated 
it wants an increase of 15c an 
hour. 

O N ANOTHER front, CWA ne- 
gotiators were also running 
into typical AT&T opposition. 

Division Six, comprising 11,000 
Western Electric installers 
throughout the nation, also has 
met blunt refusal on all pro- 
posed contract terms. The com- 
pany flatly stated that it will 
grant no wage increases. It has 
refused to eliminate the merit 
range to which Western Electric 
installers are subjected and which 
prevents the great majority from 
ever achieving top wages. 

Transfer and subsistence allow- 
ances are of the “utmost impor- 
tance” to Western Electric instal- 


lation workers who live away 
from home. Because of low wages 
and insufficient allotments from 
the company, these workers are 
forced to live under sub-standard 
conditions, the Union says. West- 
ern Electric has refused upward 
revision of these allowances. 

(Some 250 CWA installers recently 
ended a two-week walkout against 
Western Electric in St. Louis when 
the company agreed to submit a sub- 
sistence allowance provision to ar- 
bitration. The men W'cre demanding 
$4.25 daily allowance and the com- 
pany bad offered $8 a week for 10 
weeks and $4 weekly thereafter.) 

D istrict six negotiators also 
report several “unusual” com- 
pany offers in regard to pensions. 

One proposal, promptly rejected 
by the union, would give the com- 
pany the right to make changes 
in the pension program at will. 

The company then offered a 
separate pension agreement which 
would prevent degrading of pen- 
sions during the contract. This 
contract would also prevent the 
company from making other 
changes without giving the union 
30 days’ notice. If, however, the 
• division and the company could 


not reach agreement during thi? 
period, the company would still 
have the right to change the pen- 
sion provisions at will. This “of- 
fer” also was rejected. 

Division 18 negotiators, bargain- 
ing for 6,000 Western Electric 
sales dept, workers liave been un- 
able to get even a concrete “no” 
from the company. Negotiations 
conducted under a wage reopener 
are completely stalemated, accord- 
ing to union ofimials. 

On the West Coast, Division 6l 
has succeeded in eliminating 
segregated seniority lists which 
discriminated against Negro 
building service workers in the 
Southern California area of the 
Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Co. 

The Los Angeles CIO Council 
assisted the division in convinc- 
ing the company that this dis- 
criminatory practice should stop. 

W HILE THE Communications 
Workers battled for decent 
wages and working conditions, 
AT&T announced last week that 
$200 million more in capital will 
be raised to continue the Bell 
System’s huge expansion pro- 
gram. 



Newspaper Official Pays Fine For 
Employe He Prosecutes 

In Wilkes-Barre, Pa., it sometimes costs money to have a CIO 
Newspaper Guildsman arrested. 

No-one should know this better than Vice Pres. A. Dewitt Smith 
of the Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader Evening News. 

He had police arrest Merle Edwards, circulation supervisor and 
ANG member, for parking his car in an alley alongside the news 
plant, which had been declared a no-parking area by management, of 
the paper. 

When Edwards came to work the next day he was given a sum- 
mons. At the hearing before an alderman Smith was the prosecutor. 

The alderman’s decision was: “$3.50 or three days in jail.” 

“I don’t have the $3.50, so J’ll have to go to jail,” Edwards replied. 

Smith, confronted with the possibility of a circulation territory 
uncovered for three days while Edwards languished in a cell, dug into 
his pocket q^j^4>rought out three $1 bills. Edwards supplied the 50 
cents. 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 2, 1960 


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LOUISIANA 


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MASSACHUSETTS 

Lodge, Jr (R) R 

Saltonstall (R) W 

MICHIGAN 

Ferguson (R) W W 

Vandenberg (R).., W W W 

MINNESOTA 

Humphrey (D) R 


R R 

Thye‘(R ); r r w 

MISSISSIPPI 

Eastland (D) W W W 

Stennis (D) W W W 

MISSOURI 

Donnell (R) W W W 

Kem(R) W W W 

MONTANA 

Ecton (R) A A R W 

Murray (D) ,,,..R R R R 


A 

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NEBRASKA 

Butler (R) W W W 

Wherry (R) W W W 

NEVADA 


W A X W 

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Malone (R) 

. Z 

Z 

Z 

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R 

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W 

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w 

X 

W 

McCarran (D) 

. R 

R 

R 

A 

X 

A 

W 

A 

A 

X 

W 

W 

X 

R 

A 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Bridges (R) 

. A 

A 

W 

R 

w 

w 

W 

R 

W 

X 

W 

W 

w 

A 

R 

Tobey (R) 

. A 

A 

R 

R 

R 

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R 

R 

W 

A 

Z 

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w 

X 

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NEW JERSEY 
Hendrickson (R) ....... 

. W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

w 

w 

W 

W 

W 

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W 

w 

R 

R 

Smith (R) 


W 

W 

R 

W 

X 

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W 

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R 

w 

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Z 

NEW MEXICO 
Anderson (D) 

. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

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R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

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Chavez (D) 


R 

R 

A 

W 

Z 

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R 

A 

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z 

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NEW YORK 

Ives (R) 

. R 

R 

R 

R 

W 

W 

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Dulles (R) (Sworn in 7/8/49). . . 


A 

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NORTH CAROLINA 
Graham (D) (Sworn in 
3/29/49.) 


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Hoey (D) 

. W 

W 

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NORTH DAKOTA 
Danger (R) 

. R 

R 

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Young (R) 

. W 

W 

W 

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OHIO 

Bricker (R) 

. W 

W 

W 

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W 

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W 

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W 

W 

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Taft (R) 

. w 

W 

W 

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OKLAHOMA 

Kerr (D) 

. R 

R 

R 

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W 

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Thomas (D) 

. R 

R 

R 

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W 

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R 

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OREGON 

Cordon (R) 

. W 

W 

W 

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Morse (R) 

. R 

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PENNSYLVANIA 
Martin (R) 

. W 

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W 

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W 

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W 

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Myers (D) 

. R 


R 

R 

R 

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R 

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R 

R 

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RHODE ISLAND 

Green (D) 

. R 

R 

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R 

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R 

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R 

R 

R 

R 

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Leahy (D) (Sworn in 8/24/49).. . 


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W 

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* 

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SOUTH CAROLINA 
Johnston (D) 

. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

W 

W 

R 

R 

W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

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Maybank (D) 

. W 

W 

W 

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R 

W 

R 

R 

R 

A 

W 

w 

R 

X 

R 

SOUTH DAKOTA 
Gurney (R) 

. w 

W 

W 

W 

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W 

R 

W 

W 

w 

w 

W 

R 

R 

Mundt (R) 

. W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

R 

w 

w 

w 

W 

R 

A 

TENNESSEE 

Kefauver (D) 

. R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

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R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

w 

Z 

R 

A 

McKellar (D) 

. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

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W 

R 

R 

W 

W 

w 

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R 

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TEXAS 

Connally (D) 

Johnson (D) 

. W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

w 

W 

R 

A 

R 

w 

w 

R 

R 

R 

. W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

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R 

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w 

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UTAH 

Thomas (D) 

. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

z 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Watkins (R) 

. W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

w 

w 

R 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

VERMONT 

Aiken (R) 

. R 

W 

R 

R 

A 

z 

R 

R 

A 

R 

R 

R 

W 

R 

Z 

Flanders (R) 

. W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

X 

R 

R 

W 

W 

R 

W 

W 

A 

R 

VIRGINIA 

Byrd (D) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

w 

w 

W 

A 

A 

W 

W 

w 

R 

W 

W 

Robertson (D) 

. W 

W 

W 

W 

X 

w 

W 

W 

A 

W 

W 

w 

R 

R 

R 

WASHINGTON 

Cain (R) 

W 

W 

W 

R 

w 

w 

W 

W 

W 

A 

W 

w 

W 

W 

W 

Magnuson (D) — . . , , . 

. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Kilgore (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

z 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Neely (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

WISCONSIN 

McCarthy (R) 

. W 

W 

W 

A 

R 

w 

W 

R 

W 

A 

R 

W 

W 

R 

R 

Wiley (R) 

W 

W 

W 

R 

R 

w 

W 

A 

A 

W 

R 

W 

A 

R 

R 

WYOMING 

Hunt (D) 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

X 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

W 


R 

A 

O’Mahoney (D) 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

z 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

W 

R 

A 


R 


A 

Z 


I READING THE SENATE RECORD | 

5 Symbol B means a Bight vote, from viewpoint of CIO, Symbol Z means Senator was paired Bight. ^ 

I Symbol W means a Wrong vote. Symbol X means Senator was paired Wrong, 1 

3 Symbol A means Senator was Absent and not paired. Symbol * means Senator was not in office at the time of vote. 3 

SiiHiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiuiiuiiiiiiiiiiHiHiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiHiiiiijiiiuHifiiyiniiiiiiiiiHiHiiuiijnijniiiiuiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

THE CIO NEWS 1949 VOTING RECORD g 




HOUSE V0TIN6 RECORD 


Here’s a short description of each of the 13 key votes in 
the House of Representatives which are recorded on 
the next three pages. Read the description of these 
Issues — then see how your Congressman voted' on them. 


1. TAFT-HARTLEY — WOOD BILL (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: Rep. Wood (D. Ga.) proposed substitute bill In place of Taft-Hart- 

ley repeal bill. The Wood Bill was just as bad, if not worse, than 
T-H itself. Wood’s substitute bill was passed. 


VOTE: For the Wood Bill ,. m (W) 

Against the Wood Bill 203 (R) 

DATE: May 3, 1949. 


RESULT: Bill stymied efforts in House to repeal T-H during first session of 
81st Congress. 

2. T-H — RECOMMITTAL OF WOOD BILL (Supported by ao) 

ISSUE: Day after Wood Bill had been passed, foes of Taft-Hartley moved 

to recommit it — that is, bury it back in committee and nullify 
House passage of the Wood anti-union measure. Recommittal was 


voted. 

VOTE: To recommit the Wood Bill 212 (R) 

Against recommittal 209 (W) 

DATE: May 4, 1949. 


RESULT: Action nullified passage of Wood Bill, which contained many pro- 
visions more anti-union than T-H itself. 

3. MINIMUM WAGE — LUCAS BILL (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: Rep. Lucas (D. Tex.) offered bill as substitute to Administration 

proposal to improve wage-hour law. Lucas Bill provided for mass 
exemptions of workers from protection of wage-hour law, and 
weakened enforcement. Lucas was defeated in effort to install 
65c base^ pay, rising and falling with cost of living. But main ele- 
ments of his weakening bill were approved. 


VOTE: For the Lucas Bill 225 (W) 

Against the Lucas Bill 181 (R) 

DATE: August 10, 1949. 


RESULT: Some of worst elements of Lucas bill were removed in Senate- 
House conference committee — but effect of coalition-supported Lu- 
cas Bill was to weaken the 75c minimum pay bill that finally was 
passed by Congress. 

4. RENT CONTROL— WILLIAMS AMDT. (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: Rep. Williams (D. Miss.) offered amendment to rent control act 

to permit local, government units — cities, counties, states — to order 
lifting of rent controls. Proposal had strong backing of real es- 
tate lobby, which saw it as means of weakening national rent 
control program. Amendment passed, was later watered down 
a bit. 

VOTE: For the Williams decontrol amendment 227 (W) 

Against the Williams decontrol amendment 188 (R) 

DATE: March 15, 1949. 

RESULT: Williams amendment, and others, weakened whole fabric of na- 
tional rent control — and led to widespread decontrols and spiralling 
rent costs for tenants in many big areas. 

5. HOUSING — REES AMENDMENT (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: Amendment to Administration housing bill was offered by Rep, 

Rees (R. Kans.), to strike out entire section providing for low- 
rent public housing for lowest-income families. It would have 
crippled government slum clearance program. Amendment was 


defeated. 

VOTE: For Rees amendment 204 (W) 

Against Rees amendment 209 (R) 

DATE: June 29, 1949. 


RESULT: Housing bill became law— with effective slum-clearance and low- 
rent housing provisions. 

6. SOCIAL SECURITY — RECOMMITTAL (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE; Ways & Means Committee reported out social security bill con- 
taining many of improvements long advocated by labor. Republi- 
cans sought to send the bill back to committee with instructions 
to report out another, much weaker GOP bill. Recommital motion 
was defeated. 

VOTE: For motion to recommit social security bill 112 (W) 

Against recommital motion 232 (R) 

DATE: October 5, 1949. 

RESULT: House went on to pass, almost unanimously, the social security 
bill — increasing benefits and improving coverage. 


7. ANTI-MONOPOLY-^CELLER BILL (Supported by aoj 

ISSUE: Bill introduced by Rep. Celler (D. N. Y.) was designed to close 

old loopholes in Clayton Anti-Trust law. Celler bill prevents 
mergers, in restraint of trade by forbidding one corporation from 
buying Out assets of another. Bill was passed. 


VOTE: For the Celler anti-trust bill 223 (R) 

Against the Celler anti-trust bill 92 (W) 

DATE: August 15, 1949. 


RESULT: Long needed reform in anti-trust legislation moved step nearer 
to final passage. 

8. WEAKENING NATURAL GAS ACT (Opposed by aoj 

ISSUE: "Bill, strongly supported by oil and gas corporation lobbies, would 

have banned future control by Federal Power Commission of 
natural gas sales to interstate pipeline companies. Effect would 
be to raise cdnsumer price levels for natural gas. by scores of 
millions of dollars a year. Bill passed. 

VOTE; For weakening the Natural Gas Act 183 (W) 

Against weakening the Natural Gas Act 131 (R) 

DATE: August 5, 1949. 

RESULT: Passage of bill by House was severe blow to gas consumers — but 
Senate has not yet acted upon it. 

9. ANTI-POLLTAX BILL (Supported by CIO) 

ISSUE: Bill outlaws payments of polltaxes as requirement for voting in 

federal primaries and elections. Polltaxes, still imposed in seven 
southern states, keeps millions of lower-income families from vot- 
ing — and help keep many Congressional reactionaries in office. 
Bill passed House — for fifth time in recent years. 


VOTE: For the anti-polltax bill 273 (R) 

Against the anti-polltax bill 116 (W) 

DATE: July 26, 1949. 


RESULT: Bill is cleared for action in Senate — where southern polltax block 
has threatened filibuster if it comes up for vote. 

10. RULES COMMITTEE CHANGES (Supported by cto) 

ISSUE: Proposal was designed to limit pigeon-hole powers of House Rules 

Committee — where southern Democrats and Republicans have held 
up many liberal bills. Proposal permitted committee chairmen 
to bring bills directly to House floor 21 days after Rules Com- 
mittee had considered them. Proposal was approved. 


VOTE: To liberalize House rules 275. (R) 

Against liberalizing House rules f, 143 (W) 

DATE: January 3, 1949. 


RESULT: Changed rules and procedures have helped stop powerful House 
Rules Committee from “vetoing” many important bills. 

11. TRADE PACTS — RECOMMITTAL (Opposed by cio) 

ISSUE: Rep. Simpson (R. Pa.) offered motion to recommit to committee 

the Administration’s bill to extend and liberalize government’s 
power to negotiate reciprocal trade agreements, as spur to inter- 
' national commerce. Recommittal motion was defeated. 


VOTE: For Simpson recommittal motion 151 (W) 

Against Simpson recommittal motion 241 (R) 

DATE: February 9, 1949. 


RESULT: House approved reciprocal trade agreements power for three years 
— and Senate concurred later in session. Passage of bill corrected 
limitations imposed by GOP-controlled 80th Congress. 

12. ECA ^ADDITIONAL FUNDS (Supported by CIO) 

ISSUE: Vote was to provide $150 million additional funds for Economic 

Cooperation Administration, as approved by Senate amendment 
to ECA appropriation bill. Additional funds were needed to 
bolster effectiveness of European Recovery Program. Amendment 


was approved, 

VOTE: For the additional ECA funds - 177 (R) 

Against the additional ECA funds 124 (W) 

DATE: September 29, 1949. 


RESULT: Vote helped provide sufficient funds to carry on second year of 
European Recovery Program. 

13. MILITARY AID PROGRAM (Supported by CIOJ 

ISSUE; Vote was on the Senate-House conference report to provide funds 
for military assistance to western European nations which signed 
North Atlantic Pact as defense against aggression. The bill 


passed. 

VOTE: For the Conference Report 224 (R) 

Against the Conference Report 109 (W) 

DATE: September 28, 1949. 


RESULT: Through military aid program, U. S. implemented North Atlantic 
Pact to help insure democratic nations power to withstand aggres- 
sion. 


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36 SENATORS, ALL OF HOUSE FACE ’50 CONTESTS 


Jj^T LEAST 36 Senators and all members of the House of Representatives are up for 
re-election this November. With so many seats at stake, the outcome of the 1950 
election is sure to determine the control of both Houses for the next two years. 

Most of these Senators and Representatives already have made substantial records 
— one way or^he other — by their votes on key issues that came up in 1949. A few who 
were named to fill vacancies will come before the voters chiefly upon the" records they 
make in the coming session of Congress. 


Senators up for re-election are: E 

Hill (D, Ala); Hayden (D, Ariz); Fulbright (D, Ark); Downey (D, Calif); Millikin E 
(R, Colo); McMahon (D, Conn); Benton (D, Conn); Pepper (D, Fla); George (D, Ga); s 
Taylor (D, Idaho) ; Dworshak (R, Idaho) ; Lucas (D, 111) ; Capehart (R, Ind) ; Hicken- E 
looper (R, Iowa); Darby (R, Kas); Withers (D, Ky)^ Long (D, La); Tydings (D, Md); e 
D onnell (R, Mo); McCarran (D, Nev); Tobey (R, NH); Lehman (D, NY); Hoey (D, NO; E 
Graham (D, NO; Young (R, ND); Taft (R, Ohio); Thomas (D, Okla); Morse (R, Ore); e 
M yers (D, Pa); Leahy (D, RI); Johnston (D, SC); Gurney (R, SD); Thomas (D, Utah); E 
Aiken (R, Vt) ; Magnuson (D, Wash); Wiley (R, Wis). = 


^ THE CIO NEWS 1949 VOTING RECORD N 


E-UP ON 13 MAJOR ISSUES 



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ALABAMA 


3 Andrews (D) WWRRWRRWWWRRR ' 

9 Battle (D). WWWWR RWWWW Z R R 

1 Bo}to(D) • WWWWAR AWWWRRR 

6 deGraffenried (D) AAWRRRAWWRRRR 

7 Elliott (D) RRRRRRRWWRA RR 

2 Grant (D) WWWRWRRWWRRRR 

4 Hobbs (D) XXWRWRRRWWRRR 

8 Jones (D) RRRRRRRWWRRRR 

6 Rains (D) RRRRRRRWWRRAA 


ARIZONA 

1 Murdock (D) R R R R R R R W R R R R R 

2 Patten (D) R R R WW A R R R R R R R 


ARKANSAS 

1 Gathings (D) W W W W W R R W W W R R R 

7 Harris (D) WRWWWRRWWRRRR 

6 Hays (D). W RWRRRRWXRRRR 

2 Mills (D) R R W R R R R W W R R R R 

6 Norrell (D) W RWWWA RWW-WRWR 

4 Tackett (D) WRWWWRRWWRRWW 

3 Trimble (D) R R R R R R R W W R R R R 


FLORIDA 


2 Bennett (D) RRRWWRRWWRZWR 

6 Herlong (D) WRWWWA AWWR R R R 

1 Peterson (D) WRWWARAWWRRRR 

6 Rogers (D) WWWWWZWWWRRRR 

3 Sikes (D) R R W W W R A X X R R W R 

4 Smathcrs (D) RRWRWRRRXRRRR 


GEORGIA 

10 Brown (D) WWWRRRRWWRR RR 

4 Camp (D) WWWRRRRWWRRRR 

2 Cox (D) WWWWWRWWWWR R R 

6 Davis (D) WWWWWRWWWWR R R 

7 Lanham (D) RRRARRRAWRRRR 

3 Pace (D) W WW R R R AWW R R R R 

1 Preston (D) ....W WWWR R RWWR R R R 

6 Vinson (D) W WWRRRZ XWRRZ Z 

8 Wheeler (D) WWWWWRRWWWRRW 

9 Wood (D) WWWAWRA XWWRAW 


IDAHO 

2 Sanborn (R) WWWWWWWWRWWW A 

1 White (D),.. RRRRRRARRRRAW 


CALIFORNIA 

7 Allen (R) W W W W W W R W R W W W W 

8 Anderson (R) W W W W W W W W R W W R A 

11 Bramblett (R) W W W W W A W W R W W A A 

14 Douglas (D) R R R R R R R R R R R Z Z 

18 Doyle (D) ...\... RRRRRRRRRRRRR 

2 Engle (D) ' RRWWRARWRRRAX 

4 Havenner (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

20 Hinshaw (R) W W X W W W A X R W W W R 

19 Holifield (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

16 Jackson (R).... WWWWWA RWRAWWW 

3 Johnson (R) W W W W W W W A R W W R R 

17 King (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

15 McDonough (R) WWWWWWR R R RWWW 

23 McKinnon (D) R R R R R R A Z R R R R R 

6 Miller (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

12 Nixon (R) WWWWWWRW RWWR R 

22 Phillips (R) WWWWWA AWRWWA A 

13 Poulson (R). WWXAWWRWRA ZWW 

1 Scudder (R) WWWWWW RW RWWW R 

21 Sheppard (D) R R R R R R A R R R Z A R 

10 Werdel (R) WWWWWWWWWWWWW 

9 White (D) R R R R R R R R R R R WW 


COLORADO 

4 Aspinall (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRR 

1 Carroll (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

2 Hill (R) W W W W W W W W R W W W W 

3 Marsalis (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 


t:ONNECTICUT 

4 Lodge (R) W W W W R W R W R R W A R 

3 McGuire (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRA 

6 Patterson (R) R W W W W W W R R R W W R 

1 Ribicoff (D) RRRR RZRZZRRA-R 

AL Sadlak (R) W W W W W W W Z R R W W R 

2 Woodhouse (D) RRR RRAAZ RRRAA 


DELAWARE 

AL Boggs (R) WWWWWWWW RWWWW 


|]iHiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I READtNG THE HOUSE RECORD | 

1 Symbol B means a Bight vote, from viewpoint of the CIO. 1 

1 Symbol W means a Wrong vote. 1 

i Symbol X means Representative was paired Wrong. i 

1 Symbol Z means Representative was paired Bight. < ^ § 

g Symbol A means Representative was Absent and not paired. i 

= Symbol * means Representative was not in office at time of vote, p 

iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


ILLINOIS 


16 Allen (R) WWWWWW A XAWWXX 

17 Arends (R) WWWWWXWWRWWWW 

26 Bishop (Rj R R R WWWWR RWWWW 

4 Buckley (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

11 Chesney (D) RRRRRRRZRRRRR 

19 Chiperfield (R) W W W X W W W W R W W W W 

13 Church (R) W W W W W W W W R W W W W 

1 Dawson (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRR 

8 Gordon (D) R R Z R R R Z Z R R R R R 

10 Hoffman (R) WWWAW RWZ AWWXR 

23 Jenison (R) W W W W W W A W R A W W W 

12 Jonas (R) WWAWWRWZ RWWWA 

3 Linehan (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRR 

21 Mack (D) RRRRRZRRRRRAA 

15 Mason (R) WWXWWWW AWWWWW 

22 McMillen (R) WWWWXWWWRWWA A 

6 O’Brien (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRR 

2 O’Hara (D) R R R R R R R R R R R RW 

25 Price (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

14 Reed(R) WWWWWXXWRWXXX 

7 Sabath (D) RRRRRRRARRRAA 

20 Simpson (R) WWWWWWWW R RWWW 

18 Velde (R) WWWWWWWR RWWWW 

24 Vursell (R) WWWWWWWX AWWWW 

9 Yates (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRR 


INDIANA 

3 Crook (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRR 

8 Denton (D) R R R R R R A R R R R R R 

2 Halleck (R) W W W W W W A X R W X W W 

6 Harden (R) W W W W W W W W R W W A A 

10 Harvey (R) W W W W W A R W R W W A X 

11 Jacobs (D) RRR RRRAR RRRRW 

4 Kruse (D) R R R W W R A X R R R R R 

1 Madden (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

7 Noland (D) RRRRRR RXRRRRR 

5 Walsh (D) AARRRRR ARRRRR 

9 Wilson (R) W W W W W R A W R W W W W 


IOWA 

5 Cunningham (R) WRWWWXWR RWWWR 

6 Dolliver (R) ..W WXWWWA X RWXWW 

3 Gross (R) R RWWWWR R R RWWW 

8 Hoeven (R) W W W W W W R W R W W W W 

7 Jensen (R) WWWWWWWWWWWWW 

4 LeCompte (R) WWWWWWWR RWWW R 

1 Martin (R) WWWWWWWWAWWA A 

2 Talle (R) W W W W W W W W R W W W W 


KANSAS 

1 Cole (R) .' WWWWWWWW RWWWW 

5 Hope (R) W W W W W W R W R W W R R 

3 Meyer (R) ..W W W W W W W W R W X W W 

4 Rees (R) WWWWWW AWRWWWW 

2 Scrivner (R) W W W W W W W W R W W W W 

6 Smith (R) WWWWWWWWWWWWW 


N 


THE CIO NEWS 


1949 VOTING RECORD 


S! 




r VOTIIP RECORB 


(Continued from Page 5) 


PQ 


p 


P9 


^ 2 


Vi 

s 


pp 




B ^ S ^ ^ 

B 3 S 2 g 3 

^2; « H 0 g 


ootH »ocor* oosto ih 


00 


KENTUCKY 

S Bates (D) R 


ot 00^ lo^'r- ododo 


RRR RRRXRWR 


00 


9 / 

1 Gregory (D) 

W 

W 

A 

R 

R 

A 

A 

9 Golden (R) 

R 

R 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

$ Morton (R) 

W 

W 

W 

w 

Z 

A 

A 

7 Perkins (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

6 Spence (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

6 Underwood (D) 

....... R 

R 

W 

R 

R 

R 

R 

2 Whitaker (D) 

A 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

A 

LOUISIANA 

8 Allen (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

W 

R 

R 

2 Boggs (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

4 Brooks (D) 

W 

W 

R 

W 

W 

R 

R 

1 Hebert (D) 

....... W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

A 

7 Larcade (D) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

W 

,6 Morrison (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

A 

A 

6 Passman (D) 

W 

W 

R 

W 

W 

R 

W 

8 Willis (D) * 

W 

W 

R 

W 

W 

R 

R 

MAINE 

3 Fellows (R) 

....... W 

W 

A 

W 

W 

X 

A 

1 Hale (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

2 Nelson (R) 

W 

W 

R 

W 

W 

W 

R 

MARYLAND 

6 Beall (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

2 Bolton (D) 

....... W 

R 

W 

R 

W 

R 

A 

4 Fallon (D) 

W 

R 

W 

R 

W 

W 

W 

9 Garmatz (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

1 Miller (R)........ 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

W 

5 Sasscer (D) 

R 

R 

W 

R 

R 

A 

R 

MASSACHUSETTS 

6 Bates (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

4 Donohue (D). 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

z 

R 

2 Furcolo (D) 

....... R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

8 Goodwin (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

10 Herter (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

1 Heselton (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

R 

R 

11 Kennedy (D) 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

R 

A 

7 Lane (D) 

: R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

14 Martin (R) 

w 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

i2 McCormack (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

9 Nicholson (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

S Philbin (D). 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

6 Rogers (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

IS Wigglesworth (R) ; ...... . 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

MICHIGAN 

12 Bennett (R) 

R 

R 

W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

6 Blackney (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

8 Crawford (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

15 Dingell (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

17 Dondero (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 


R R 
R R 
A A 
W R 


X W W R 

A R R Z 

A R R W W W 

A R R R R R 

R R R R R R 

W R R R R R 

X X R Z A A 


W W R R A A 
W W R R A X 
X W W R W W 
X W R R Z Z 


W W W W A A 


W R R 
X W W 
R R R 
W R W 
R R W 


R R R 
WWW 
W A W 
W A A 
W W R 


9 Engel (R) R 

5 Ford (R) W 

4 Hodman (R) W 

16 Lesinski (D) R 


A R 


R R 
W R 

RWWRRWRR 
WWWWW R X R 
WWWWWWWW 
RRRRRARR 


Michener (R) WWWWWWWW 

O’Brien (D) ARR RRRRR 

Potter (R) W W W W W W R X 

Rabaut (D) R R R R R R R Z 

Sadowski (D) R R R R R R R R 

Shafer (R) W W W W W X A W 

Wolcott (R) WWWWWWWW 

Woodruff (R) W W W W W W 


R W 
W W 
A W 
R Z 
W X 
R W 
R W 
W X 
R R 
W W 
R R 
R W 
R R 
R Z 
W X 
R W 
A W 


W W 
W R 
A A 
A Z 
W W 
W R 
W R 
W W 
R R 
R R 
R R 
W W 
R R 
A X 

w w 

A A 

w w 


MINNESOTA 

7 Andersen (R) WWWW'WRRRRRWWW 

1 Andresen (R) WWWWWWW A X WWWW 

8 Blatnik (D) RRRZRARRRRRAX 

9 Hagen (R).. W W W W W R R R R R W W W 

5 Judd (D) W W W W W W R R R W Z R R 

6 Marshall (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRW 

4 McCarthy (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRR 

i O’Hara (R) W W W W W W W W W R W W W 

8 Wier (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R W 

MISSISSIPPI 


Abernethy (D) 

W 

w 

w 

w 

w 

R 

R 

W 

w 

w 

R 

W 

W 

Colmer (D) . 

W 

w 

w 

w 

w 

R 

W 

w 

w 

w 

R 

W 

w 

Rankin (D) . 

w 

w 

w 

w 

w 

A 

W 

w 

w 

w 

R 

W 

w 

Whitten (D) 

w 

w 

w 

w 

w 

A 

R 

w 

w 

w 

R 

R 

R 

Whittington (D) 

w 

w 

w 

w 

w 

R 

R 

w 

w 

R 

R 

A 

R 

Williams (D) 

w 

w 

w 

w 

w 

R 

R 

w 

w 

w 

A 

W 

W 

Winstead (D) 

w 

w 

w 

w 

w 

R 

A 

w 

w 

w 

R 

R 

R 


MISSOURI 

5 Bolling (D) R 


R R 
R R 
R R 
R R 
R A 


A R 
R R 
R A 
R R 
A R 
R W 
R R 
R R R R 


R R 
R R 


R R R 
R R R 
R R R 
R R R 
R ,R R 
R R R 
R R R 
R R R 


R R 
R R 
A A 
R R 
R R. 
R R 


R R R 

9 Cannon (D) R R R R 

8 Carnahan (D) R R R R 

6 Christopher (D) R R R R 

4 Irving (D) R R R R 

10 Jones (D) R R R R 

12 Karst (D) R R R R 

13 Karsten (D) R R R R 

1 Magee (D) R R R R R R A R W R R R R 

2 Moulder (D) R R R R R R R W R R R R R 

7 Short (R) W W W W W W W W W W X A A 

11 Sullivan (D) R R R R R R R R R R R R R 

3 Welch (D) R R R R R R R W R R R R R 

MONTANA 

2 D’Ewart (R).... W W W W W W W W W W W W W 

1 Mansfield (D) ....R R R R R A R R R R R Z .Z 

NEBRASKA 

1 Curtis (R) W W W W W W W W W W W W A 

4 Miller (R) W WWWW R A W RWWWW 

2 O’Sullivan (D) RRRRRRRRRRRRR 

3 Stefan (D) W W W W W R R R R W W W W 


NEVADA 

AL Baring (D) R 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 


RZRRA AZRRRAA 


R 


W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

R 

2 Colton (R) 

W 

w 

W 

w 

w 

W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

W 

R 

R 

R 

w 

W 

W 

1 Merrow (R) 

W 

W 

W 

w 

w 

X 

W 

W 

R 

R 

R 

R 







NEW JERSEY 



















11 Addon.z.o (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

W 

w 

A 

W 

3 Auchincloss (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

A 

R 

W 

W 

W 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

W 

8 Canfield (R) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

W 

R 

R 

R 

R 

W 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

W 

6 Case (R) 

R 

R 

W 

w 

R 

R 

A 

R 

A 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

z 

5 Eaton (R). 

......... w 

W 

X 

w 

w 

W 

A 

A 

R 

W 

A 

A 

W 

R 

W 

W 

w 

R 

2 Hand (R) 

W 

W 

W 

w 

R 

R 

W 

Z 

R 

R 

W 

X 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

14 Hart (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 







' 4 Howell (D)... 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 







12 Kean (R) 

.*... W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

W 

R 







13 Nopton (D) 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

A 

A 

Z 

R 

R 

Z 

A 

R 

R 

W 

W 

R 

R 

10 Rodino (D). 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 


R 

R 

R 

W 

A 

A 

7 Thomas (R) 

A 

X 

A 

A 

X 

A 

A 

A 

A 

W 

A 

A 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

9 Towe (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

X 

A 

A 

R 

R 

X 

W 

R 

R 

W 

W 

A 

W 

1 Wolverton (R) 

W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

R 

A 

R 

R 

R 

w 

A 

W 

R 

W 

W 

R 

R 














R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

NEW MEXICO 













Z 

R 

R 

W 

A 

R 

AL Fernandez (D) 

R 

R 

w 

w 

R 

R 

R 

W 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

W 

R 

R 

R 

W 

W 

w 

A 

W 

R 

R 

AL Miles (D) 

R 

R 

w 

w 

R 

R 

A 

W 

R 

R 

A 

R 


NEW YORK 

25 Buckley (D) R 

32 Byrne (D) R 

15 Celler (D) R 

4 Clemente (D) R 

39 Cole (R) W 

17 Coudert (R) . W 

35 Davies (D) R 

6 Delaney (D) R 

24 Dollinger (D) R 

28 Gamble (R) W 

44 Gorski (D) R 


R R R R A A 
R R R R A R 
R R Z R R R 
R R R R R R 
W W W W A A 
W W W W W A 
R R R R R 


R R R A A 
R R R Z A 
R R R A A 
R R R R R 
A A W A A 
A W Z A W 
W R R R X 


RRRRRRRRRRRR 
R RR RRRRRRRRR 
A W R W W W R 

R R R A R R R 

A W 


W W W W W 

R R R R R 

w w w w w 


37 Hall, E. A. (R) 

.. W 

w 

w 

w 

w 

W 

A 

A 

R 

R 

W 

W 

R 

2 Hall, L. W, (R) 

.. w 

w 

w 

w 

w 

W 

W 

W 

Z 

W 

W 

A 

R 

11 Heffernan (D) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

z 

A 

z 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

7 Heller (D) (Sworn in 2/15/49). . 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

z 

R 

* 

* 

A 

R 

21 Javits (R) 

. . R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

z 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

31 Kearney (R) 

,...w 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

w 

Z 

R 

W 

W 

R 

40 Keating (R) 

w 

W 

W 

W 

R 

A 

R 

R 

R 

W 

W 

R 

Z 

9 Keogh (D). 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

z 

34 Kilburn (R). 

.. W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

X 

A. 

w 

X 

W 

W 

W 

R 

19 Klein (D) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

z 

R 

R 

R 

A 

Z 

3 Latham (R) 

.. W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

R 

W 

W 

A 

A 

30 LeFevre (R) 

.. W 

w 

w 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

W 

W 

R 

23 Lynch (D) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

1 Macy (R) 

.. W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

A 

W 

X 

R 

W 

W 

A 

A 

18 Marcantonio (AL) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

R 

X 

W 

26 McGrath (D) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

z 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

14 Multer (D) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

A 

16 Murphy (D) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

z 

Z 

R 

R 

A 

A 

13 O’Toole (D) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

8 Pfeifer, J. L. (D) 

.. R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

R 

A 

Z 

42 Pfeifer, W. L. (R).. 

... W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

A 

A 

R 

W 

W 

■^A 

R 

22 Powell (D) 

,.. R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

Z 

Z 

R 

Z 

W 

W 

5 Quinn (D) 

... R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

45 Reed (R) 

.. W 

W 

W 

X 

W 

X 

A 

w 

W 

W 

W 

A 

A 

36 Riehlman (R) 

. . W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

X 

A 

A 

R 

R 

W 

A 

A 

20 Roosevelt (D-L) (Sworn in 6 /1 4/49)* 


« 

* 

R 

Z 

R 

Z 

R 

♦ 

* 

A 

R 

12 Rooney (D) 

R 

R 

R 

R 

Z 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

29 St. George (R) 

... W 

W 

A 

W 

A 

W 

W 

R 

R 

W 

W 

W 

W 

38 Taber (R) 

... W 

W 

W 

W 

X 

w 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

W 

43 Tauriello (D) 

... R 

R 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

R 

R 

A 

R 

A 

A 

33 Taylor (R) 

... W 

W 

W 

W 

R 

W 

A 

W 

R 

R 

W 

A 

Z 

41 Wadsworth (R) 

... w 

w 

w 

w 

W 

X 

W 

W 

X 

W 

W 

W 

R 


THE CIO NEWS 1949 VOTING RECORD 


N 


t 






NORTH CAROLINA 

3 Barden (D) . . W 

1 Bonner (D) W 

11 Bulwinkle (D) X 

7 Carlyle (D) W 

5 Chatham (D) W 

4 Cooley (D) Z 

8 Deane (D) R 

9 Doughton (D) W 

6 Durham (D) W 

10 Jones (D) R 

2 Kerr (D) W 

12 Redden (D) ^ 

A ORTH DAKOTA 


HIO 

2 Bolton (R) W 

3 Breen (D) R 

1 Brehm (R) R 

7 Brown (R) / W 

9 Burke (D) R 

5 Clevenger (R) A 

1 Crosser (D) R 

1 Elston (R) . W 

-0 Feighan (D) R 

18 Hays (D) R 

14 Huber (D) R 

10 Jenkins (R) W 

19 Kirwan (D) R 

4 McCulloch (R) W 

17 McGregor (R) 

16 McSweene^ (D) : . . . 

;:6 Polk (D) R 

i 5 Secrest (D) R 

' 8 Smith (R) ... A 

;i2 Vorys (R) W 

2 Wagner (D) R 

>3 Weichel (R)....: W 

AL Young (D), R 

OKLAHOMA 

3 Albert (D) 

1. Gilmer (D) Z 


REGON 


ENNSYLVANIA 

1 Barrett (D) R 

>3 Buchanan (D) R 

’3 Cavalcante (D) R 

4 Chudoff (D) R 

0 Corbett (R). R 

9 Dague (R) W 

.9 Davenport (D) R 

32 Eberharter (D) R 

12 Fenton (R) W 

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Kroll Predicts 


1 S50 NO ‘OFF YEAR’ 
FOR LABOR VOTERS 

By JACK KROLL 

Director, CIO Political Action Committee 


DANBEB! 119501 AHEAP! 

TAKE A LOOK AT THE NATION'S VOTING RECORDI 



•'OFF YEAR” 1938 1940 

36,224,428 49,820,312 


"OFF YEAR” 1942 1944 

28,043,748 47,976,263 


"Off YEAR” 19461 1948 

34,400,742 48,833,680 


T950 


tt 


OFF YEAR” 1938 


• This low vote resulted in the defeat of 71 
liberal congressmen. It elected the 76th Con- 
gress which refused to fortify Guam • pre- 
served our armed forces by only one vote ♦ 
killed WPA • refused FDR’s request for a 
public works program • started the Repub- 
lican-Dixiecrat coalition • gave the New Deal 
itsi first setback 


"OFF YEAR” 1942 


• This low vote resulted in the defeat of 51 
liberal congressmen. It elected the 78th Con- 
gress which • turned OPA over to industry • 
refused to help the farmers* removed curbs on 
war-time salaries • passed the “relief for Ae 
greedy” tax bill over FDR’s veto • passed Ac 
anti-labor SmiA-Connally act over FDR’s veto 


- "OFF YEAR” 1946 “ 

• This low vote resulted in Ae defeat of 49 
liberal congressmen and elected Ae 80A Con- 
gress which gutted Ae wage-hour act • de- 
stroyed farm price supports • weakened Ae 
Department of Labor and Ae Federal Security 
Agency • slashed taxes for Ae wealAy • re- 
fused action on housing, education, high 
prices, civil rights, excess profits • PASSED 
TAFT-HARTLEY ACT 


1950 


It’s up to you! 


YOU DON'T COUNT UNLESS YOU CAN BE COUNTED * * * REGISTER AND VOTE 


'We Want A Better U.S.A. For Everyone' 


T he political action of 
the CIO in 1950 enters 
upon the greatest year of its 
history. In this critical year 
we confront a .great opportu- 
nity and a terrible threat. 

It is in 1950 that our prin- 
^^.es of liberal government 
are going to achieve a stable 
permanent victory, or suf- 
fer a crushing reversal, such 
as happened in 1946. The pro- 
gram of huhian welfare for 
which the CIO works and 
fights can be firmly established 
in our economy, or it can be 
halted and even beaten back. 

This year is an “off year” 
according to American politi- 
cal tradition, just as 1946 was 
an “off year.” In the 1946 elec- 
tion, only 34 million Ameri- 
cans turned out to vote, and 55 
million more stayed home. 

The 1946 “off year” gave us 
the 80th Congress, dominated 
by reactionary Republicans. 
They and their allies, the reac- 
tionary Southern Democrats, 
junked price control, ham- 
strung rent control, reduced 
the ta^fes of the wealthy, 
smashed the world trade pro- 
gram and gave us the Taft- 
Hartley Act. 

The record of the 80th Con- 
gress demonstrated once more 
that all we may win on the 
picket line can be lost in the 
halls of government. We 
learned once more from the 
1946 “off year” that economic 
advances must be protected 
and carried forward by politi- 
cal action. 

1950 No *Off Year* 

Norw in another “off year” 
we of the CIO must write a 
new political tradition. It is up 
to us to make sure that the 
tradition of the low vote is put 
aside, and that there is a full 
and representative vote in No- 
vember, 1950. 

We know that when the ma- 
jority of our fellow citizens go 
to the polls, the mandate of a 
smashing majority is given for 
progressive government. We 
know that when the people do 
not vote they — and we of the 


CIO — are punished by the evils 
of minority government. 

If we allow 1950 to be anoth- 
er “off year” we are likely to 
find ourselves under the con- 
trol of the reactionaries. That 
is the hard lesson of hiStory. 

Get Out The Vote 

We can head off this disas- 
ter with a simple program — 
to get out the vote. 

But programs will not do 
the job by themselves. They 
are not automatic. Blueprints 
never elected a single friend 
of the public or stopped a 
single reactionary. 

To win we must turn plans 
and talk into action and work. 

Every member of the CIO 
can help get our 1950 job 
done, by making sure he gives 
his dollar for political action. 
Every member can start the 
big task by making sure his 
own vote, and that of his wife, 
and every adult member of his 
family, is protected — by regis- 
tration — and that every vote 
is cast in the November elec- 
tion. 

That is what 1950 requires 
of us. This can not be dele- 
gated to committees. It is 
something every member must 
do himself, if the principles of 
liberal government are to sur- 
vive the election of 1950. 

We in the CIO must start 
the 1950 job of political action 
now, for the time of decision 
is here. 


I ONG-RANGE action to re- 
■■ store and maintain a truly 
democratic government in our 
country is a major part of the 
CIO-PAC program for 1950. 

The long-range program 
takes its place in the CIO’s 
1950 campaign among the ur- 
gent current issues, such as 
national health insurance, civil 
rights and repeal Taft-Hartley. 

By the mandate of the 
Cleveland Convention, the po- 
litical action committees of 
State and local Councils and 
of International unions now 


have the task of working for 
long-term goals which are not 
to be achieved in any one elec- 
tion, but will require continu- 
ous effort in every campaign. 

Current programs are con- 
cerned mostly with results, in 
terms of the public welfare. 
The long-term program is con- 
cerned with the means by 
which political results are ac- 
complished, and the aim of the 
CIO is to bring about reforms 
and improvements which are 
long overdue in our country. 

Five CIO Proposals 

Five of the proposals of the 
CIO are aimed to remove bar- 
riers that have grown up be- 
tween the popular will and the 
functioning of their Govern- 
ment. These proposals, as 
stated in the Cleveland Con- 
vention resolution are: 

1. “Revise our registration 
laws to eliminate cumbersome 
requirements designed to pre- 
vent the expression of the pop- 


ular will and provide only so 
much regulation as is neces- 
sary to prevent fraud. 

2. “Pay state legislators and 
state officials enough so that 
able men and wo^aen and 
young men and women, anx- 
ious to make their contribu- 
tion to the political life of 
their community, may be at- 
tracted to the service of the 
people. 

3. “Provide for direct and 
open primaries in which all 
the people can choose the can- 
didates for public office and in 
which all persons desiring to 
become candidates can file 
without undue restrictions. 

4. “Remove from our politi- 
cal life the disgraceful prac- 
tice of juggling election dis- 
tricts — both state and national 
— ^whereby voters in one com- 
munity exercise more influence 
than voters in another, and 
where representatives of a 
few hundred thousand people 
can outvote millions. 

5. “Eliminate the outmoded 
electoral college and provide 


for direct election of President 
and Vice-President so that 
there will be no danger that 
a minority candidate can gain 
office by a technicality.” 

Better Procedures 

Two other CIO proposals are 
aimed at removing undemo- 
cratic procedures in Congress. 
As declared by the Convention 
they are: 

“Abolish the seniority sys- 
tem in Congress by which wis- 
dom is stifled and age takes 
precedence over ability. 

“Abolish the Senate fili- 
buster.” 

All State and local organiza- 
tions and International unions 
have been urged to incorporate 
the CIO long-term political 
program in their plans for 
presentation to the State legis- 
latures in 1950. 

Candidates will be asked 
where they stand on the long- 
term program and their posi- 
tion will be one of the factors 
upon which indorsement is 
based. 




£ = 

I Are You A Good CIO Member? I 

s: = 

I I 

£ Every good CIO member will carry a receipt for his = 
1 PAC dollar in 1950. The receipt books will go out to the | 
g international union treasurers in the near future. § 

E When your shop steward asks you to help fight the | 
5 1950 political action battle don’t let your union down. Give = 

g a buck to PAC. 1 

s Non-union members can send their dollar directly to e 
£ CIO-PAC, 1346 Connecticut Ave. N. W., Washington, D. C. | 

g THE CIO NEWS 1949 VOTING RECORD 



He Just Had To 
Have Books 
To Read 

T he men who worked with him 
often called him “The Professor,’^ 
and there was some justification for 
the nicl^name. 

When he wasn’t busy organizing he was 
reading. 

“We organizers used to get together in 
the evening for a friendly poker game or 
a few hands of rummy,” one of his former 
associates said. “We’d invite The Profes- 
sor but he’d never join us. He always had 
his nose in a book.” 

One of the first places The Professor 
went when he landed in a town was the 
public library. > 

He was kidded quite a bit about his 
studiousness — but he once got the “last 
laugh” on those who tossed jibes at him. 

T he professor was sent to a small 
town to do a bit of “missionary work” 
for the CIO and report on the possibility 
of organizing the local mill. 

He soon started hunting for the public 
library. There wasn't any. 

He then learned there was a small col- 
lege in town, so^he headed for the college 
library. 

There he met temporary failure. He 
wasn’t a student and, consequently, wasn't 
entitled to borrow books. 

Being a determined man. The Professor 
called on a college instructor to see if he 
couldn't obtain special permission to use 
the library. 

The instructor not only took care of 
this matter but introduced him to other 
instructors. 

T he professor, whose formal educa- 
tion had been somewhat limited, was 
invited a short time later to speak to the 
college's political science class. 

He did a good job and gained new ac- 
quaintances among other members of the 
faculty. 

✓ 

Through these associations he became 
acquainted with some of the ministers of 
the town and in a short time he was active 
in one of the local churches. 

Before long he had gained the friend- 
ship of a number of community leaders 
and was “accepted” by the so-called “upper 
crust” of the town. 

I N ADDITION to being a scholar. The 
Professor was a handy man with tools 
and he was a fluent talker. 

He spoke the language of the mill be- 
cause he'd spent much of his life in indus- 
trial plants. 

As he moved about the town he’d discuss 
politics and philosophy with the professors, 
religion with the ministers and pay and 
working conditions with the mill's em- 
ployes. 

And it was nothing unusual for him to 
hang a door or do a bit of sawing or 
planing for a worker whd had a repair 
job on his hands. 

And at every opportunity he put in a 
good word for the CIO. 

T he town, long known as anti-union, 
treated The Professor well — not like a 
carpetbagger. 

Mill workers soon forgot their suspicion 
of him and began signing union applica- 
tion cards. 

Finally the NLRB conducted an election 
and the workers selected a CIO group as 
its collective bargaining agent, 

This surprised The Professor's superiors 
but not The Professor. 

When he learned about the election vic- 
tory, one of The Prof's organizer-friends 
declared: 

“After handing out a million leaflets at 
plant gates I find out that I don't know 
nothin' about organizing. So long, guys, 
I'm going down to the library and poke 
my snoot in some musty old books. I got 
a tough campaign cornin' up!” A. E. S. 


HAPPY NEW YEAR? 



Nation 'Can Afford' More 


Social Security 


PRESIDENT TRUMAN has been advised 
■ by his Council of Economic Advisers 
that the nation “can afford a considerably 
expanded social security program without 
impairing our economic stability or weak- 
ening our growth potential.*' 

The report, made public by the White 
House, was apparently designed to answer 
Republican charges that the “welfare pro- 
posals” advanced by the Fair Deal Admin- 
istration would bankrupt the country. 

The discussion of the cost of social se- 
curity expansion was included in the coun- 
cil’s fourth annual report to the President, 
which was devoted to a discussion of the 
relationship between government and busi- 
ness and was couched in terms obviously 
designed to placate business leaders. 

T hroughout the report the Council 
placed more emphasis on the objective 
of stable expansion of the economy than 
on the more controversial theory of using 
government expenditures to compensate 
for private spending. It sounded as if the 
members of the Council — Leon Keyserling 
and John D. Clark — were trying to reas- 
sure business that they did not place too 
much faith in “compensatory spending,” a 
theory which some business spokesmen 
have attacked. 

Their report said, for instance, that 
“compensatory” public action “can help to 
iron out minor fluctuations of the business 
cycle and must indeed be used if big ones 
develop” but added that “complete recov- 
ery from a substantial downswing depends 


primarily upon the revival of private in- 
vestment.” 

In line with this de-emphasis on “com- 
pensatory” spending, the council proposed 
to put more of the government programs 
“on a somewhat more stable and longer- 
range basis.” 

Thus, it suggests that public works 
should be considered not as a means of 
taking up slack in unemployment but from 
the standpoint of providing the things the 
nation needs. 

“Similarly,” it said, “a decision to expand 
our educational facilities should be related 
closely to the priority value which we place 
upon education, rather than to the useful- 


Anti-Eraser? 

If CIO Guildsmen are as good as 
Eugene Farrell, assistant to the publisher 
of the Harrisburg (Pa.) Patriot-News, 
thinks they should be, no errors will be 
made in the editorial offices. 

He summoned the grievance committee 
of the Harrisburg Newspaper Guild to tell 
it that he will dismiss any Guildsman who 
makes a mistake if he considers it part 
of a “pattern.” 

Farrell charged that the editor of the 
Home Star, weekly publication, has been 
receiving help from the Guild in his cam- 
paign to point out publicly errors in the 
Patriot-News. The Guild said the charge 
is ridiculous. 

The reason that Farrell summoned the 
Guild committee was that two make-up 
errors appeared in Evening News. 


ness of social construction in taking up a 
business slack.” 

|N LINE WITH this theory of promoting 
■ stable economic growth, and building 
our plans accordingly, the Council found 
an expansion of social security desirable 
and sound. 

Social security is justified on two 
grounds, it said. First is the ground that 
the cost of caring for the old, the unem- 
ployed and the sick cannot be escaped and 
can be handled most efficiently through 
a systematic plan rather than depending 
on charity or improvisation. 

The second justification for social se- 
curity, the Council said, is that “as an en- 
lightened nation” we are willing to divert 
some of our output away from those who 
are producing it to care for those “who 
are unable to produce through no fault of 
their own.” 

On the question of how much we can af- 
ford for social security, the council said we 
should base our judgment on the assump- 
tion of a growing economy and how much 
of an expanded output will be available in 
the future. 

On the broader subject of the relation- 
ship between government and business, the 
council found a better understanding of the 
problems of government among business 
leaders. But it said the business system 
“needs to embrace even more fully — as its 
enlightened leadership has already done — 
the goal of continuous maximum produc- 
tion and employment.” — (LPA.) 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 2, 1950 


5 


Biography of Broon Reviewed 


A Newspaper Column Gave Birth To A Union 



THIS PHOTO of Heywood Broun probably pictures him as most 
newspapermen remember him. It was taken at the 1938 CIO 
convention at ^Pittsburgh, where he attended as a delegate of the 
Newspaper Guild, of which he wAs president. 


H eywood broun once 
quoted “a hard bitten So- 
cialist” as saying of Eugene 
Debs : 

‘That old man with the 
burning eyes actually believes 
that there can be such a thing 
as the brotherhood of man. 
And that's not the funniest 
part of it. As long as he’s 
around I believe it myself.’ ” 
Dale Kramer in his biography 
of Broun writes of the particular 
column from which this quotation 
was taken. 

‘‘And mystically inclined as he 
was, and relating Christ to the 
brotherhood of man, Broun could 
not help looking for brotherhood 
iri his own time and place. Slowly 
over the years his respect , for Eu- 
gene V. Debs had grown. Debs’ 
statement that when men were in 
jail he was not free, affected 
Broun deeply. 

“Upon the death of Debs in the 
autumn of 1926, Broun wrote: 
‘The Debs idea will not die. To 
be sure, it was not his first at 
all. He carried on an older tradi- 
tion. It will come to pass. There 
cmi be- a brotherhood of man.’ ” 

B roun did not Uve to be an 
old man, but otherwise the 
description of Debs in the second 
paragraph of this review; fits him 
to a “T.” When he wrote and 
when he spoke, you did believe in 
the brotherhood of man, and what 


Warning 

Dale Kramer told Hey- 
wood Broun more than a 
decade ago that he was going 
to write Broun’s biography, 
according fo the publisher’s 
blurb on the book’s fly leaf. 

“Broun warned him,” says 
the blurb, “to proceed cau- 
tiously because he was a 
much more devious man than 
appeared on the surface.” 


is more I am eager and willing to 
argue that belief stuck through 
the years to many of the people 
who knew Broun — even those who 
knew him casually. 

There is always the risk in talk- 
ing about brotherhood to get 
overly sentimental, an error 
which Kramer’s book avoids. 

I T WOULD be well to pursue the 
brotherhood idea further, be- 
cause that probably lead up to 
one of the most widely discussed 
phases of Broun’s life. What led 
him to turn from the faith of his 
people, the Episcopal Church, to 
Catholicism? 

Kramer threw much needed 
light on this whole matter. 

Broun had been mulling over 
this matter of his church connec- 
tion when he met Alfred Mc- 
Cosker, publicity director of the 
Mutual Broadcasting Co. It was 
at Broun’s insistence, Kramer 


says, that McCosker arranged for 
the columnist to receive religious 
instruction from Monsignor Ful- 
ton J. Sheen. 

Broun also was impressed by 
the fight being made by Father 
Tranchese for better housing at 
San Antonio, Texas, in the face 
of a hostile community. He con- 
tinued his talks of Catholicism in 
St. Louis with Father Edward 
Dowling, former baseball player, 
former newspaper man and then 
editor of a Catholic paper. 

Broun voiced the fear that 
Catholicism would stand in the 
way of his liberalism. Let Kramer 
continue the story: 

■ipATHEB DOWLING said that 

■ there was not (any danger to 
his liberal beliefs). ‘Don’t you re- 
alize that you’re a little naive, 
Heywood?’ he asked. ‘You like to 
call yourself a radical, but the 
doctrines of the church are far 
more radical.’ 

“He pointed out that one of the 
top CIO leaders, Philip Murray, 
was a Catholic. And in the big 
CIO drives the, local priests had 
generally helped, not hindered. 

Kramer goes into the subject 
quite thoroughly, but perhaps the 
best answer for Broun’s conver- 
sion was the one that author 
quotes him as giving to Carl D. 
Randau, onetime president of the 
New York Newspaper Guild: 

“ ‘I wanted the brotherhood of 
man. I have found it now because 
its full fruition can come only un- 
der the Fatherhood of God.’ ” 

Kramer calls his book a bio- 
grapical portrait. It is. It is a well- 
rounded portrait, for this book, 
which the author first thought of 
writing 10 years ago, is about as 
complete a picture of a man as 
words can give. 

He speaks of Broun’s humor, 
his love of life, his drinking habits 
(as every newspaperman knows, 
he consumed great quantities of 
gin but was rarely drunk), his 
willingness to*^ share his money 
and his talents for a good cause, 
the influence on him of his first 
wife, Ruth Hale, the militant 
feminist. 

■lUT THE monument to Broun 
® is the Newspaper Guild, which 
was “born” in his newspaper col- 
umn for the World-Telegram. 

Kramer tells how Broun came 
to write it. Broun was on the way 
from his country place in Con- 


necticut to New York to keep a 
date with Connie Madison, the 
widow of the actor Johnny Dooley, 
whom Broun later was to wed. 
He had not written his column 
and was looking over the news- 
papers for an idea. 

He glanced through accounts of 
the National Recovery Act (Blue 
Eagle) for news of the Publishers’ 
Code. 

The publishers were hoping to 
get their editorial workers classi- 
fied as professional, the NRA 
codes providing that persons paid 
$35 a week were exempt from the 
codes, were called professionals 
and were allowed to work an un- 
imited number of hours a week. 

He kept his date, had a few 
drinks and a salad and asked to 
be excused for 25 minutes. He 
went to the club’s office, where 
he hammered out on a borrowed 
typewrite a column which con- 
cluded: 

“But the fact that newspaper 
editors and .owners are genial folk 
should hardly stand in the way of 


the organization of a newspaper 
writers’ union. There should be 
one. Beginning at nine o’clock on 
the morning of October 1, I am 
going to do the best I can to help 
get one up. I think I could die 
happy on the opening day of the 
general strike if I had the privi- 
lege of watching Walter Lipp- 
mann heave half a brick through, 
the Tribune window at a non-un- 
ion operative who had been called 
in to write the current Today and 
Tomorrow column on the gold 
standard.” 

To newspapersmen throughout 
the land this was the call to ac- 
tion now, not a couple months 
away on October 1. They deluged 
Broun with calls, asking him to, 
do something. 

He accepted the challenge. 
Meetings were held in his rent 
house apartment and elsewhere. 

And a union was born. 

— ^Fred Ross 

Heywood Broun by Dale 
Kramer, Current Books^ Inc. 
A, A, Wyn, publisher. 


Heywood Broun Would Have 
Been Proud of McGinnises 

When Guildsman K. Brian McGinnis voted “yes” on a motion to 
strike the Arkansas Gazette at Little Rock, Dec. 17, a whole galaxy of 
personal plans came to an abrupt halt. 

Mac and his wife Rosalie (a former Gazette staffer) long had 
wanted a quiet place of their own out in the country. The deal was 
set — the next day, they were to sign papers on a little log house 10 
miles west of Little Rock. Already they had given notice to the owner 
of the house they rented in town. 

And the car. The McGinnises had a new one picked out. They had 
agreed to let the salesman know the next day whether they would 
take it. 

The strike caught the McGinnises short. Rosalie was at home when 
the strike vote was taken. And when the vote was counted, Mac drew 
duty on the initial picket line. 

, Another Guildsman called Rosalie to relate the news. 

Rosalie’s response: “Did Brian wear his overshoes?” 

— from Strike, publication of the Arkansas Newspaper Guild 


m 



got sort of fed up with the conventional pattern; so, I sort 
of let go on this one — ^like it?” 


Prof. Malin of Swarthmore 
Is Named ACLU Director 


Plant Mishaps Kill 
300 in 3 Months 

Industrial accidents took the 
lives of more than 300 workers 
during the third quarter of 1949, 
and caused permanent physical 
impairment to some 4400 others, 
the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics reported last week. 

Including the deaths and perma- 
nent injuries, nearly 86,000 work- 
ers in manufacturing establish- 
ments were disabled for two or 
more days by work injuries. 

The most^ significant increases 
in accidents, the' Bureau reports, 
were in the manufacture of bat- 
teries, canning and preserving, 
ornamental metal work, bever- 
ages, heating equipment, leather 
tanning, apparel and accessories, 
and tinware. 

The principal decreases were in 
planing mills, trimmings and fab- 
ricated textile products, general 
machine shops, cutlery and edge 
tools, sugar refining, and concrete, 
g:ypsum and plaster products. 


P ROF. PATRICK M. MALIN of 

Swarthmore College has been 
elected director of the American 
Civil Liberties Union, succeeding 
Roger N. Baldwin, who held the 
post for 30 years. 

Baldwin resigned to specialize 
iri international civil rights. 

Malin has been a member of 
the economic department at 
Swarthmore College since 1930. He 
was a vice-director of Inti. Com- 
mittee on Refugees, American di- 
rector of the Inti. Migration Serv- 
ice and also served in Federal 
government posts. 

Baldwin will continue to handle 
the ACLU’s international work. 
He will also act for the Inter- 
national League for the Rights of 
Man, of which he is board chair- 
man, an UN consultative agency 
with which the ACLU is affiliated. 

Announcement of the election 
of Malin by the ACLU board was 
made by Dr. John Haynes Holmes, 
board chairman. Malin will take 
over the directorship on Feb. 1 at 


the close of the academic half- 
year. Clifford Forester, former 
staff counsel of the Union, will 
serve as acting director during 
January. 

Drive Planned To Aid 
N. Y. Laundry Workers 

An intensive drive to organize 
laundry workers in New York 
City who are still outside the un- 
ions’ fold has been announced by 
Manager Sander Genis of the 
N. Y. Laundry Workers Joint 
Board, affiliate of the Amalga- 
mated Clothing Workers. 

The drive will start after New 
Years and will conclude Jan. 31. 
Genis said that 5 to 7% of the 
city’s laundry workers were still 
unorganized, most of them em- 
ployed in small laundries in south 
Brooklyn. Six Chinese laundries 
still unorganized will also be in- 
cluded in the drive. 


6 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 2, 195» 




NLRB Says 
No Vote, 
No Penalty 

i F JOU DON’T have the 
privilege of using the elec- 
tion machinery of the NLRB, 
the board can’t impose Taft- 
Hartley penalties on you. 

The board, so ruled unanimously 
in dismissing charges of unfair 
practices brought against Kern 
County (Cal.) Farm Labor Union, 
Local 218 of the Natl. Farm Labor 
Union-AFL, by the giant Di 
Giorgio Fruit Corp. 

In upholding a trial examiner’s 
recommendation, the board said 
that because agricultural workers 
are specifically exempted from 
the Taft-Hartley act’s jdefinition 
of employes a union of agricul- 
tural workers cannot be prose- 
cuted under the act. Moreover 
the board agreed that the union 
had not committed any unfair 
acts. 

The decision was made in a 
complicated case involving four 
unions and a strike against Di 
Giorgio which has been in prog- 
ress since October 1947. Di 
Giorgio has repeatedly refused to 
bargain. 

T he board also dropped 
charges against Teamsters 
Local 87, which also is on strike 
against Di Giorgio, but ruled that 
Local 87 is covered by the Taft- 
Hartley act because some of its 
members work in non-agricultural 
enterprises. IVine Workers Local 
45 and Teamsters Local 848, were 
found to have engaged in illegal 
activities in support of the strike. 

Background of the decision re- 
flects no credit on Di Giorgio or 
the labor board’s general counsel, 
Robert N. Denham. Originally the 
Farm Union and Local 87 at- 
tempted to bring charges of re- 
fusal to bargain against the_com- 
pany and to obtain an NLRB elec- 
tion among 1500 Di Giorgio work- 
ers. The board said it had no 
authority to conduct a poll of 
agricultural workers. 

Denham had no such compunc- 
tions, however. After the unio-ns 
struck, Di Giorgio complained they 
were indulging in unfair prac- 
tices. Denham ob^ined an injunc- 
tion in the summer of 1948. The 
trial examiner found substantially 
against Denham and the case 
went to the board. 

On appeal from the trial ex- 
aminer’s report, a Di Giorgio at- 
torney in oral argument before 
the labor board last Nov. 21 con- 
fessed when asked that his client 
wanted to have his cake and eat 
it too. 

T he AFL. Typographical Union 
won a round in its bare- 
knuckles fight with the Taft-Hart- 
ley act when the NLRB dismissed 
charges of unfair practice brought 
against the union’s Local pl5 by 
the Nassau-Review Star of Rock- 
ville Center, L. I. 

However, the union lost a round 
the same day when the board 
ruled that its Baltimore local vio- 
lated the act by insisting upon a 
closed shop in bargaining with 
the Baltimore Graphic Arts 
League, spokesman for commer- 
cial printers. 

In the Long Island case, the 
board, reversing the finding of a 
trial examiner, declared a one- 
year, oral agreement calling for 
the closed shop was valid because 
it was reached just before the 
Taft-Hartley measure went into 
effect in August 1947 — (LPA) 




A NEW AND IMPROVED CONTRACT has 
been negotiated by the CIO United Transport 
Service Employes for dining car workers on 
the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. 
L. to r., Pres. John L. Owens of UTSE Local 
311; UTSE Natl. Pres. Willard S. Townsend; 
Harold D. Snell, assistant to Townsend; Ed- 
ward T. Bell, the union’s general chairman on 


the Burlington; W. E. Angier, Burlington staff 
officer of labor relations; J. E. Wolfe, assistant 
vice president of the railroad, and P. M. Scott, 
dining car superintendent. The new contract 
eliminated a unilateral ,wage cutting clause, 
improved the deadhead rule grievance proce- 
dure. The old contract had been negotiated 
by the AFL Hotel and Restaurant Employes. 


AM A Opposes Disability Insurance^ 
Fears Patient Would Want to Stay 111 


C OMING OUT flatly against 
the disability insurance 
provision of the Administra- 
tion’s social security program, 
the American Medical Associa- 
tion contends disability insur- 
ance would ''adversely affect 
the patient’s desire for re- 
covery.” 

An editorial in the current issue 
of the AMA journal charges that 
a federal disability program 
“would represent another step 
tpward nationalizatio-n of medical 
care and socialization of the prac- 
tice of medicine.” This is the 
largest language it uses in at- 
tacking President Truman’s 
health insurance program. 

“If enacted,” the editorial says, 
“the bill would encourage further 
liberalizations which are not dif- 
ficult to visualize; for example, 
payment of benefits to dependents 
of disabled persons, substitution 
of temporary for permanent dis- 
ability benefits and eventually full 
cash sickness and disability pro- 
visions. If such a plan were fol- 
lowed, a total national compul- 
sory sickness taxation program 


Health Co-op Wins Court Decisions 
In Bout With AMA Affiliate 

Second of the current court battles to break the hold of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association over physicians’ job rights is now under way 
in Seattle, Wash. Pretrial hearings of the suit by Group Health Co- 
operative of Puget Sound against the local medical association have 
ended, with decisions on nearly every point favoring the co-op. 

Group Health, formed four years ago, now serves more than 20,000 
member-patients, has the services of 20 physicians under contract, and 
owns a hospital whose facilities have been approved by the AMA. 

The co-op charged the local medical society threatened . to expell 
any doctor who furnished prepaid medical care in competition with 
its own and that the local hospital had adopted a rule barring all doctors 
who do not belong to the society. 

Superior Court Judge Meakin ruled that Group Health has a right 
to relief from the society’s practices if they are as pictured by the co-op. 
He recommended prompt hearing of the suit. 


for all practical purposes would 
be in effect.” 

T he AMA says aid to disabled 
needy should be administered 
on a local level, and not through 
a “system of compulsory federal 
taxation or control.” 

Insurance for workers perma- 
nently and totally disabled is the 
most important new feature of 
the Administration’s bill, passed 
by the House last session, for 


modernizing the social security 
laws. 

While far more conservative 
thaji the program recommended 
by the Social Security Board, it 
would permit workers who are 
permanently and totally disabled 
to get the same kind of insurance 
benefits that aged workers get. 
The conservative House Ways and 
Means Committee found that total 
disability was just as deserving 
of insurance as old age. 






Organizationally Speaking 


The writer attended a conference held at the CIO 
Regional Office, Chicago, 111., last week. Various 
CIO groups, including the new lUE-CIO partici- 
pated, and CIO Regional Directors from the ad- 
joining areas also attended. The 
lUE-CIO situation was discussed 
and plans laid to bring to a suc- 
cessful conclusion the campaign 
for the new union. Full support 
was pledged to the lUE by all 
organizations present 
Nineteen hundred and forty- 
nine has been a year of achieve- 
ment. Three hundred and twenty 
thousand telephone workers were 
brpught into the CIO fold. The Steelworkers strike 
ended in victory, bringing pension, security, and 
health benefits. A new world trade union movement, 
the International Confederation of Free Trade 
Unions, was established. The CIO Convention in 
Cleveland acted decisively, emphasizing a deter- 
mination to maintain a free trade union movement 
unhampered by henchmen of any groups and taking 
steps to see that this determination is adhered to. 

On 1950 — the half century mark — I wish you all 
the happiest New Year. If we all work together, 
l^reat achievements are in store for us in the com- 
ing year and the years to come. 


Reg. Dir. Irwin DeShetler reports that in a rep- 
resentation election held at the Fruehauf Trailer 
Co., Los Angeles, the UAW-CIO was victorious by a 
vote of 182 to 34 over the AFL. UAW-CIO Reg. Dir. 
Cy O’Halloran was in charge of the campaign. 

Field Rep. T. D. du Cuennois reports that in a 
representation election held at the Oscar Nebal 
Hosiery Co., Staunton, Va., the TWUA-CIO was 
victorious by a close vote of TWUA 92, no union 91. 
In an election held at the Greenstone Co., Lynch- 
burg, Va., the workers voted 23 to 13 in favor of 
the USA-CIO. 

Reg. Dir. Fullerton Fulton reports that UE Local 
1145 held a membership meeting in the Minneapolis 
Armory, Minneapolis, Minn,, and voted unanimously 
to affiliate with the lUE-CIO and was immediately 
granted a charter. This local covers some 5090 
people. 

Reg. Dir. Hugh Thompson reports that in a rep- 
resentation election helfi at the CThandler Division 
of the Carcalo Manufacturing Co., Buffalo, N. Y., 
Local 233, CIO Rubber Workers was victorious over 
the AFL Upholsterers Union by a vote of 76 to 19. 
Gordon L. McMahon, URW-^CIO field representative, 
was in charge of the campaign. 


N. J. CIO 

Blasts 7c 
Fare Rule 

T hose extra pennies the 
customers have been pay- 
ing to hang on a strap or hold 
a seat on a bus for the last 
17 months have “unjustly and 
unreasonably enriched Public 
Service Corp.” by millions of 
dollars. 

That comment was made by 
Pres. Carl Holderman of the New 
Jersey State CIO in releasing the 
results of a CIO examination of 
the Public Utility Commission 
order upholding the 7c basic bus 
and trolley fare. 

Holderman, who has appealed 
to Governor Driscoll to order At- 
torney General Parsons to seek 
a court review of the PUC order, 
said the examination disclosed 
“10 interesting facts,” which in- 
cluded: 

The 7c fare was originally re- 
quested by Public Service solely 
to meet increased wage costs 
amounting to $2,989,626. Public 
Service said it would have total 
annual operating revenues of 
$49,852,779, under the 7c fare, to 
cover the increased wage cost. In 
the 1^-month period ending June 
30, 1949, 12 months’ actual opera- 
tion under the 7c fare yielded 
$55,251,334— $5,398,555 above Pub- 
lic Service’s own estimate of its 
required additional revenue. 

In other words, to me.et a wage 
increase amounting to about 10% 
of operating costs Public Service 
was given a 40% fare increase 
to 7c. 

At the reopening of the case, 
when it was shown that Public 
Service’s income was far in ex- 
cess of its needs to meet the 
wage increase, the company, over 
the objections of counsel for the 
state and many municipalities, 
whs permitted by the PUC to 
shift its course in mid-stream 
and argue the question of ade- 
quacy of its rate of return. 

Social Security 
Tax Increased 

Social security taxes, from 
which old-age and survivors in- ■ 
surance benefits are paid, in- 
creased from 1% to 1^5% for both 
employer and employee, effective 
Jan. 1. The new rate means that 
(instead of Ic) is now de- 
ducted from your pay for each 
dollar (up to $3,000 a year) which 
you receive in wages. 

This tax increase was scheduled 
under the present social security 
law. It does not mean an increase 
in the rate of benefits which are 
now being paid under the old-age 
and survivors insurance program. 

Congress has not as yet taken 
final action on a pending bill 
which would increase benefit rate« 
and bring more workers under the 
social insurance protection of the 
old-age and survivors insurance 
program. This bill, which has been 
passed by the House of Represen- 
tatives, now awaits action by the 
Senate. 

Qvil Rights Asked 
At D. C. Exposition 

The District of Columbia CIO 
Council has urged that the Ses- 
quicentennial in Washington in 
1950 be the occasion for efforts to 
advance the cause of civil rights, 
and that the exposition itself be 
a perfect example of civil rights 
for all who visit it. 


N 


THE eio NEWS, JAITOARY 2, 1950 



Experts Give Congress Plan To KG Poverty 


By NATHAN ROBERTSON 

For Labor Press Association 

T WO WEEKS of hearings 
have given Congress a 
program based on a remark- 
able unanimity of opinion 
from experts on what needs to 
be done to raise the incomes of 
10 million American families 
now forced to live on less than 
$2000 a year. 

Rarely has Congress faced a 
tougher, or' bigger problem. Yet 
rarely has there been so much 
agreement on how to handle a 
major national problem. 

More than 30 experts, from 
within and outside the govern- 
ment, including economists, so- 
cial workers, spokesmen for farm 
and labor groups, educators, and 
religious leaders appeared before 
the Joint Congressional Economic 
Subcommittee headed by Senator 
John Sparkman (D, Ala.), to of- 
fer suggestions. Most of them 
agreed on what needs to be done. 

The subcommittee is now pre- 
paring a report for the full com- 
mittee. If it follows the sugges- 
tions of the experts, the commit- 
tee will recommend enactment of 
the whole Fair Deal program sub- 
mitted by President Truman, plus 
other measures going beyond 


Geller May Subpoena Report 
Of FTC On Du Pont Empire 

Rep. Emanuel Celler (D. N. Y.), chairman of the House Mo- 
nopoly Investigating Committee, is reported to be preparing to use 
his subpoena power for the first time — to get a report prepared by 
the Federal Trade Commission on the structure of the DuPont empire. 

The report, prepared months ago by the staff of the FTC, has 
been kept under cov^er on the grounds that it would disclose data 
given the commission by the DuPont company confidentially. But 
members of the Commission staff have felt this was only a pre- 
text — ^because the operations of DuPont are well enough known 
so that no real secrets are involved. 

Those who have seen the report say it is a damaging indict- 
ment of the way the DuPont chemical empire has operated to 
crush competition. The DuPont chemical company is the biggest 
in the country. It also controls General Motors, one of the na- 
tion’s biggest industrial corporations, and U. S. Rubber, .another 
of the tremendous companies operating in the industrial field. The 
Justice Department already has brought suit to force dissolution 
of the DuPont control of GM and U. S. Rubber. 


what the President has asked. 
Virtually everything that labor 


and liberal groups have been 
fighting for would be approved by 
Congress. 

Heading the recommendations 
from almost every witness was 
the maintenance of lasting full 
employment. It was generally 
agreed that without that as a 
starting point little could be done 
to improve the lot of the mil- 
lions of families and individuals 
now existing in poverty or near 
poverty. 

But there was almost as com- 
plete agreement on a whole pro- 
gram of positive legislative pro- 
posals. Here is a summary: 

Social Security — Almost every 
witness backed pending proposals 
to modernize and liberalize the 
social security laws so they would 
covef more of the population and 
provide more adequate benefits 
for the aged and handicapped. 
Some witnesses went far beyond 
pending proposals, urging nation- 
alization of the unemployment in- 
surance law and insurance for 
temporarily disabled workers. 


neither of which is provided in 
the bill which passed the House 
last session. 

Minimum Wage — Many pro- 
posed a higher minimum wage 
than the 75c fixed by Congress 
last session, and all who discussed 
the subject urged expansion of 
the coverage through both feder- 
al and state legislation. 

Health — Almost every witness 
stressed the necessity for federal 
action in the field of health, the 
American Medical Association to 
the contrary. Many specifically 
urged enactment of the proposed 
national health insurance bill. 
Others talked in more general 
terms of the need for federal ac- 
tion, stressing the part bad health 
plays in cutting down family in- 
comes. 

Education — Almost every wit- 
ness stressed the importance of 
better educational facilities for 
American , youth and recommend- 
ed federal action to provide them. 
The federal aid-to-education bill 


Murray Asks Heavy 
Vote For Congress 


C IO PRES. Philip Murray, in 
his New Year’s statement 
called for enactment of “the re- 
maining portions of the New 
Deal program” and for participa- 
tion by all the people in the 1950 
congressional elections. 

“We in the United States can 
make 1950 ‘just another year’ or 
we can make it a real milestone 
in our march of progress,” Murray 
said. 

“It is my hope at the begin- 
ning of the New Year that we 
will do the latter. 

“Much more than our own do- 
mestic welfare is at stake — be- 
cause of the position of world 
leadership our nation has as- 
sumed since the end of the war. 

“This leadership — unless we are 
to forfeit it — requires that we set 
outstanding examples in democ- 
racy and economic advancement. 
It requires that we set examples 
which those in other lands are 
willing to follow. It requires 
that we put our own house in 
order. 

■WO ME THIS means that we 
* must take concrete action 
during the year to raise the 
standard of living of all our peo- 
ple, but particularly those in the 
low-income brackets. 

“It also means that we must 
expand and make more secure 
those civil rights which are the 
foundation of our democracy. 

“The CIO intends to work hard 
during 1950 to help achieve these 
two things. 


“We intend to attack — frequent- 
ly and hard — the lackadaisical at- 
titude of some groups that unem- 
ployment and wasteful use of our 
national resources must continue. 
We will work for full employment 
and wise utilization of all our 
resources. 

“We will continue, with re- 
newed vigor, our fight to wipe 
out discrimination based on race, 
creed and color. 

limj^E WELL, continue our cam- 
paign to get rid of the 
Taft-Hartley Act and other laws 
which place unfair restrictions on 
labor unions and limits the eco- 
nomic freedom of millions of^ 
workers. 

“We intend to continue our 
fight for a more equitable distri- 
bution^ of the fruits of our vast 
production machine. 

“Our program, we are convinced, 
is designed to make life better 
for the bulk of our population — 
not just for those who belong to 
the CIO. 

“It is because of this that we 
urge Congress to enact without 
delay the remaining portions of 
the Fair Deal Program. 

“And we also urge that all the 
people get prepared to exercise 
their full voting strength at the 
polls during the elections next 
fall. We must have a Congress 
responsive to the will of the rfia- 
jority of the people — a Congress 
that will work earnestly for bet- 
ter conditions for all our people.” 


now pending in the House was 
repeatedly recommended, along 
with a whole series of other pro- 
posals including scholarships, bet- 
ter vocational training, and ex- 
panded appropriations for school 
construction and teachers’ sal- 
aries. 

Regional Development — Wit- 
nesses stressed the problem areds 
where most of the inhabitants are 
in the low-income category be- 
cause of regional or area prob- 
lems. The experience of TVA was 
frequently cited as the pattern 
for solving such regional prob- 
lems. 

Rehabilitation of the Disabled — 

Expansion of current rehabilita- 
tion programs was generally rec- 
ommended. Most of the witnesses 
stressed that it is cheaper to re- 
habilitate the disabled than to 
support them as invalids. 

Low-Income Farmers — ^Witnesses 
generally agreed on expansion of 
help to low-income farmers 
through the Farm Home Corpora- 
tion program, extension of social 
security and the wage-hour law 
to farmers, and a broad program 
to help migrant farm workers. 

Fair Employment Practices — 
Many of the witnesses stressed 
the special handicaps faced by 
minority groups in getting jobs 
and recommended enactment of 
the FEPC legislation. This, how- 
ever, faced strong opposition from 
Chairman Sparkman. 

There was little discussion of 
the cost of these programs but 
most witnesses stressed the idea 
that in the long run it would be 
cheaper to enact these measures 
than to do without them. The cost 
of poverty to communities and 
the nation was heavily empha- 
sized. Many of the proposals were 
offered as good lnvestmenl;s, or as 
more economical ways of handling 


the problem than the way we 
handle it now. 

The program outlined by the 
witnesses in these hearings will 
be enacted sooner or later. The 
sooner the better for the country 
— the rich as well as the poor. 

Wood Union Wins 
Ontario Contract 

The first major settlement in 
the Ontario furniture industry 
covering 1950 has been won by the 
CIO Woodworkers. 

IWA Eastern Canadian Dir. 
Landon Ladd said agreement had 
been reached between the union • 
and Knetchel’s Ltd. of Hanover 
after six months’ negotiations. 

The settlement includes a 7c-an- 
hour increase, one week’s extra 
pay in lieu of retroactive pay to 
Aug. 14, 1949, and a group insur- 
ance plan, the cost of which will 
be shared equally by company and 
union. 

The agreement also provided for 
a union shop and check-off of un- 
ion dues in addition to six paid 
holidays and two weeks vacation 
with pay after five years of serv- 
ice. 

Education Parley 

A discussion of the National 
Health Bill will be led by George 
Guernsey, CIO Associate Educa- 
tion Director, at the Midwest 
Workers Education Conference in 
Milwaukee, Wis., the week-end of 
Jan. 21-22. The conference is 
sponsored by the American Labor 
Education Service. 

Victor Reuther, United Auto 
Workers education director, will 
be chairman of a discussion on un- 
solved problems in social security, 
scheduled for the closing session. 


FTC Aide All-Out Steel Price 

Probe Under Way 


Flays Steel 
Price Plan 

T he steel industry’s ef- 
fort to compromise with 
the Federal Trade Commission 
on price fixing charges has re- 
ceived a serious setback. Cor- 
win D. Edwards, director of 
the FTC’s Bureau of Indus- 
trial Economics, has de- 
nounced the industry’s plan in 
such strong language that it 
probably will be rejected by 
the commission. 

Critics of monopoly, who have 
been watching the steel industry’s 
effort to work out a deal with the 
commission, were elated at Ed- 
wards’ statement, filed with the 
commission Dec. 27, because Ed- 
wards has great influence with 
most of the members of the body. 

The FTC two years ago charged 
the steel industry with using the 
basing point pricing system to fix 
prices. Similar charges against 
other industries have since been 
upheld by the Supreme Court, and 
So the industry has been negotiat- 
ing with the commission for a 
consent decree settlement. 

M eanwhile, in Congress, the 
big industries have been try- 
ing to. get legislation reversing 
the Supreme Court action. A bill 
of this kind passed both Houses 
last year, but got tangled up in 
controversy between the two 
houses. It is due to come up again 
in January. 


By DONALD WOODS 

Labor Press Associates 

A THOROUGH investigation of 
price iupreases by the steel 
industry since the War — showing 
how monopoly operates under 
the price leadership of the giant 
U. S. Steel Co. — has been insti- 
tuted by the Celler Monopoly In- 
vestigating Committee of the 
House. 

The investigation, inspired by 
the recent $4-a-ton increase which 
the industry placed in effect after 
U. S. Steel led the way, is ex- 
pected to provide ^ case history 
of monopoly in operation under 
modern industrial “oligopolies,” 
in which indujstries are not con- 
trolled by single companies but 
by groups of big companies. 

If the investigation turns out 
the way it is expected to do, it 
may prove to be the most impor- 
tant monopoly inquiry for many 
years. The steel industry is like 
many other heavy industries to- 
day — an industry in which sev- 
eral big companies, supposedly 
competing, always follow the • 
price leadership of one company, 
in this case U. S. Steel. 

S pokesmen for industry call 
this competition. Critics of 
monopoly contend it is just the 
reverse — a monopoly, or rather 
an “oligopoly” where prices and 
production are controlled by the 
industry, rather than by the mar- 
ket place. 

If this can be proven in steel. 


it will be proved for many 
other industries such as electri- 
cal equipment, chemicals, cement, 
and perhaps even automobiles, 
supposedly the most competitive 
of America’s big. industries. 

The facts in the case are clear. 
There have .^been several major 
price increases since the war. 

Since January 1945, steel prices 
have been increased about $33.50 
per ton in base prices alone, not 
counting the extra increases, 
which virtually all purchasers of 
steel pay. The last increase oc- 
curred last month when steel 
prices went up an average of $4 
a ton. 

In each case U. S. Steel has set 
the pace and the other big com- 
panies have fallen into line. 
Critics of the industry contend 
tha^ if there were competition in 
the industry the prices would not 
always follow so closely the pat- 
tern set by U. S. Steel. They 
contend the evidence proves ab- 
sence of competition. 

In the latest increase, for ex- 
ample, the cost of pensions which 
is used as the excuse for the 
price increase is only a fraction 
of the cost added to prices 
charged consumers. Yet all the 
big companies went up just as 
high as U. S. Steel. 

If the case can be proved 
against the steel' industry it will 
give tremendous impetus to the 
movement already in Congress to 
do something about bigness in 
business. 


8 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 2, 1950 


N 







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CONi^BSSS Of 
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Vol. XIII 


WASHINGTON, D. C.. JANUARY 9. 1950 a^^82 No. 2 


HST Tells Congress: 


THE STATE of the union is good 
but it would be better if Congress 
enacted the remainder of the Fair Deal 
program. 

That’s what President Truman told 
the 81st Congress when it opened its 
second session. Then he outlined again 
— as he had done at the first session — 
the things he would like to have Con- 
gress do. 

He asked for repeal of Taft-Hartley, 
continuation of rent control, enactment 
of a middle-income housing law, ex- 
pansion of social security, development 
of public power, passage of civil rights 
legislation, continuation of ECA, fed- 
eral aid to education and an improved 
farm income program. 

The President is shown above and 
at left as he delivered his state of the 
union message. The close-up shows bini 
pointing his finger at Republican mem- 
bers as he blamed the GOP-controlled 
80th Congress for the present budget 
deficit. 


(For additional details, see Pa^es 
6 and 7.) 















Steinberg Charges 

FTA Followed Every 
Twist In CP Line 


T he leadership of the 

Food Tobacco & Agricul- 
tural Workers was accused 
last week of having followed 
Communist policies through 
every zig and zag of the party 
line during the past 10 years. 

The charge against the FTA 
leadership was made by William 
Steinberg, head of the American 
Radio Association. He accused 
FTA leaders of having “adopted 
the policies of the Communist 
Party as its own without regard 
either to the CIO or to the gen- 
uine interests of trade unions.” 

Steinberg, who filed charges of 
Communist domination against 10 
unions at the CIO Executive 
Board meeting in Cleveland in 
November, amplified his com- 
plaint against the FTA leadership 
with a 10-page statement read to 
a special CIO hearing committee. 

The hearing was held behind 
the closed doors of the Board 
room at CIO headquarters in 
Washington. 

■ Sitting as members of the com- 
mittee named by Pres. Murray 
were Pres. Jacob Potofsky of the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers, 
chairman; Sec.-Treas. Emil Mazey 
of the «!^uto Workers; and Pres. 
Joseph Curran of the Natl. Mari- 
time Union. 

Hearings on the United Public 
Workers were scheduled for Jan. 
9, and on the Mine. Mill & Smel- 
ter Workers for Jan. 18 — both at 
CIO headquarters in Washington. 
The CIO Executive Board is ten- 
tatively scheduled to meet on 
Feb. 14^and may act on recom- 
mendations submitted by the 
hearing panels. 

ARA Pres. Steinberg, in his 
testimony, made clear that nei- 
ther he nor the CIO wishes to 
impose “political uniformity” on 
CIO members or unions — a 
charge frequently made by both 
the Daily Worker, Communist or- 
gan, aud by some left-wing union 
spokesmen. 

S TEINBERG made public his 
testimony after he had con- 
cluded his appearance at the 
closed meeting. 

“As Phil Murray has said,” 
Steinberg declared, “There is 
room enough in the CIO for many 
differences of opinion. 

“The mere fact that a member 
of a trade union, or an officer of 
a trade union, or the union itself, 
differs from the CIO in an honest 
judgment as to what proper trade 
union policy should be, is not a 
basis upon which any action,/! 
believe, should be taken or can be 
taken under the provisions of the 
CIO Constitution,” he added. 

But. it’s a “different matter,”' 
the ARA president asserted, in 
the case of “slavish adherence to 
the doctrine of a financial organi- 
zation which believes in trade un- 


ions, if it believes in them at all, 
only as instruments of its plan 
for world conquest.” 

Steinberg recalled that Donafd 
Henderson — formerly FTA presi- 
dent, now its director of adminis- 
tration — “has been the guiding 
spirit "of this union from its in- 
ception.” 

On Dec. 22, 1941, the FTA News 
carried this statement by Hender- 
son: “It is a matter of public 
record that I have denied affilia- 
tion to the Communist Party 
many times.” But on Sept. 29, 
1949, the same paper carried Hen- 
derson’s statement that he had 
resigned from the Communist 
Party. 

T he CIO HEARING on FTA 
took place in a blizzard of 
law suits filed by FTA and other 
left wing unions. 

CIO members who, after the 
Cleveland convention and execu- 
tive board meeting, had expected 
an “in the family” investigation 
^Df the charges against the unions, 
guessed wlong about the tactics 
of many of the left-wing union 
leaders. 

Here’s the tally sheet on law 
suits, at the time of this writing: 
1 UOPWA Lawsuit No. 1: Plea 
for injunction to forbid hear- 
ings by the CIO committee on 
charges against the Office Union. 
Filed in Philadelphia U. S. Courl; 
denied on grounds that the Phil- 
adelphia court had no jurisdic- 
tion. 

2 UOPWA Lawsuit No. 2: 

Nearly a carbon copy of the 
Philadelphia suit; asks court to 
enjoin CIO from proceeding fur- 
ther with case against the union. 
Filed in U. S. court in Washing- 
ton, D. C.; hearings on the re- 
quest for injunction were set for 
Jan. 10. 

2 UOPWA Lawsuit No. 3: *Prac- 
* tically identical with Lawsuit 
No. 2. Filed in U. S. court in 
New York City; hearings set for 
Jan. 9. 

^ United Public Workers Law- 
* suit No. 1: Asked for injunc- 
tion against hearings or other 
further action. Filed in Phila- 
delphia early in December; pre- 
sumably dead, on grounds that 
that court has no jurisdiction, 
g FTA Lawsuit No. 1:^ Plea for 
* injunction to restrain CIO 
from holding hearings or taking 
further action against FTA; to 
declare invalid changes in CIO 
constitution dealing with Commu- 
nist issue, as adopted at Cleve- 
land convention; and to protect 
FTA’s alleged “property interest” 
in CIO. Filed Jan. 3 at U. S. 
court in New York; judge will de- 
cide by Feb. 1 whether to take 
further action. 

^ CIO Lawsuit No. 1: Damage 
* suit against UOPWA, seeking 
to collect $18,700 for which union 
has signed promissory notes to 
the CIO. 


UAW Watchman 
Who Found Bomb 
Kidnapped 

George William Thomas, 58, 
the night watchman who found 
the Christmas-package bomb at 
the CIO Auto Workers’ head- 
quarters in Detroit was kid- 
napped early on Jan. 6 and then 
dumped in a snow bank, still 
bound and gagged. 

Thomas said he was kid- 
napped by two men outside a 
downtown hotel, “They drove 
me all over town,” he said. 

Thomas said he had quit his 
job Dec. 24 because he was 
afraid to work at UAW head- 
quarters. He added that he 
was unable to identify his ab- 
ductors. 

Left Loses 
Bridges^ 
Home Local 

T he “HOME^’ local of Pres. 

Harry Bridges of the CIO 
Longshoremen’s Union now 
has a new set of officers — all 
pledged to anti - communist 
policies.,. 

Phil Sandin, wffio was elected 
president of the group — ILWA 
Local 10 at San Francisco — headed 
a slate which had pledged: 

“I am not a member of the 
Communist Party or any other 
group seeking to dictate the poli- 
cies of Local 10.” 

The Sandin slate won all of 
the major offices and took 54 out 
of the 65 contested positions listed 
on the lengthy ballot. 

Sandin received 2302 votes to 
2024 for Henry Schmidt, a co- 
defendent with Bridges in the 
current perjury-conspiracy trial 
at San Francisco. 

Bridges and his international 
union now faces CIO charges of 
“Communist domination.” 

N. J. CIO Asks 
More Benefits 

Highlighted by a call for a $39 
maximum weekly payment for a 
married man with tWo children in 
all state benefit programs, the 
New Jersey State CIO disclosed 
it would seek 19 amendments this 
year to New Jers*ey’s unemploy- 
ment, temporary disability and 
workmen’s compensation laws. 

Harry Kranz, State CIO legisla- 
tive director, said the CIO’s 30- 
man legislative committee had 
decided to seek an increase in 
UCC, TDI and workmen’s com- 
pensation benefits to a maximum 
of $30 weekly, plus $3 per de- 
pendent up to three dependents. 

Maximum UCC and TDI bene- 
fits are now $22 weekly, while 
workmen’s compensation weekly 
payments are $25 in New Jersey. 

Repeal of a number of provi- 
sions of the present unemploy- 
ment compensation (UCC) law 
will be sought by CIO, Kranz said. 
These include elimination of the 
worker contribution; of the one- 
week waiting period for benefits; 
of the “active search for work” 
requirement; and of the reqqire- 
ment that a worker must earn at 
least 30 times his weekly benefit 
amount to be eligible for benefits. 

T he CIO also called for exten- 
sion of UCC coverage to in- 
clude firms employing one or 
more workers; decentralization of 
the Trenton office so that benefit 
determinations are made in local 
offices; and payment of benefits 
irymediately in lock-outs and after 
four weeks in strikes. 


FTC Has No Faith 
In 'Miracle’^Paints 

If there are any “miracle” paints on the market the Federal Trade 
Commission doesn’t believe it. 

The Commission has issued a cease and desist order against three 
firms accused of misrepresenting so-called “plastic” paints. - 

The three companies, Cello-Plastics, Pittsburgh, Pa., Cello-Nu 
Products, Philadelphia, Pa., and Cello-Nu Products, Chicago, 111., are 
forbidden to represent any of their products as “miracle” paints or to 
infer that they differ substantially in composition frSm any other good 
quality paint on the market. 

One of the cited owners, Bertram Unger of Pittsburgh, has also 
been directed to stop using the term “Chemical Company” in his trade 
name. 


With GE Next On lAst 


lUE-UE Dispute Aired 
At 4 NLRB Hearings 


T he dispute between lUE- 
CIO and the UE got an 
airing during the past few 
weeks as NLRB fact-finding 
boards heard testimony re- 
garding the issues involving 
four different companies of 
the electrical industry. 

The issue of bargaining repre- 
sentation in the five locals of Gen- 
eral Motors’ electrical division 
came up before NLRB Hearing 
Officer David Sachs in Dayton. 
Starting just before Christmas, 
the hearings were continued the 
following week for a total of five 
days. 

Jan. 11 was set as the last date 
for filing briefs and a decision on 
whether to hold elections is ex- 
pected from the Board late this 
month. 

General Electric hearings, in- 
volving 99 bargaining units, will 
begin in New York City on Jan. 17. 


Herzog demanding that consent 
elections .be held ' simultaneously 
in the three big companies— GE, 
GM and We'stinghouse. 

lUE Chairman James B. Carey 
replied in a letter to the Board 
that he would be happy to take 
part in discussions on consent 
elections provided they were en- 
tered into in good faith. 

limj^E DESIRE that elections 
among the employes of 
these companies be held at the 
earliest possible dates,” Carey 
wrote. 

“. . . It appears to us that elec- 
tions should be held, on the 
Board’s order, no later than Feb. 
15th in General Motors, and short- 
ly thereafter in the Westinghouse 
and General Electric cases. Con- 
*sent elections, therefore, should 
be held no later than Feb. 1 in 
General Motors, Feb. 6 in West- 
inghouse, and Feb. 10 in General 
Electric.” 


H earings involving the Wur- 
litzer plant in Buffalo took 
three days, but the prize-winner 
in time so far is the Sperry- 
Gyroscope case in New York. The 
hearing started Dec. 22 and was 
still going on late last week. 

UE lawyers at the Spe'rry-Gyro- 
scope hearings claimed that CIO’s 
expuslion of UE was illegal and 
that, therefore, UE is still a mem- 
ber of CIO. As the Sperry lawyer 
put it, UE is reaching a new high 
of “obscurantism, obfuscation and 
obstruction.” 

lUE officials charged that the 
UE was “doing everything possi- 
ble to make the hearings last as 
long as possible.” 

As an. example they cited the 
case of UE Attorney Frank 
Scheiner asking Paul Jennings, 
president of the lUE local at 
Sperry. “Have you ever heard of 
John L. Lewis?” 

After an objection from Irving 
Abramson, attorney for lUE, on 
the grounds of irrelevancy was 
sustained, Scheiner asked Jen- 
nings,, “Have you ever heard of 
Philip Murray?” The process was 
repeated. 

Westinghouse hearings began 
Dec. 28 in Pittsburgh before 
NLRB Rep. H. Raymond Cluster. 
These sessions, which will cover 
the scores of Westinghouse locals, 
are expected to continue for about 
three weeks. 

An unexpected twist occurred 
Jan. 3 when UE Pres. Albert 
Fitzgerald sent an irate tele- 
gram to NLRB Chairman Paul 


Carey declared that “this pro- 
posal to the Board by UE comes 
after a long i)eriod in which the 
expelled CIO affiliate has used 
every conceivable means of delay- 
ing collective bargaining votes in 
GE, GM and Westinghouse. . < 

“UE has used legal harassment 
in the form of injunctions against 
locals . . . soughts a permanent 
injunction against the NLRB hold- 
ing hearings. 

“Once the hearings started, UE 
employed every possible method 
of disrupting the proceedings, 
making countless dilatory objec- 
tions. 

“In the face of all this history, 
UE should not be permitted to 
use a phony consent election ap- 
peal to further delay the determi- 
nation of a collective bargaining 
agency by the workers in this in- 
dustry.” 


Bed Board Company 
To Modify Oaims 

Hereafter the makers of “Rest- 
Well Bed Board” and “Orthopedic 
Bed Board” are not going to 
claim in advertisements that their 
product: 

Makes one healthy or invig 
rated, or has any beneficial effec 
for anemia or diseases of the kid- 
neys or other organs; that it pro- 
duces natural sleep or corrects or 
prevents deformities of the body. 

The owners of the business, : at 
the insistence of the Federal 
Trade Commission, will stop 
these practices. 



t'lAMUFACTURERS 
WORLD’S FINEST /ANESTHESIA 




e,ns07^ 


2 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 9, 1950 


N 


Experts Sayss 

Proposal Would Cut Rents, Home Interest Sharply 


By D. ROCKWELL CLARK 

PRESIDENT TRUMAN has 
* endoresd a proposal to 
remedy the desperate housing 
situation of millions of “mid- 
dle-income” families, including 
most members of organized 
labor, by establishing a loan 
program to finance large-scale 
cooperative and other non- 
profit housing both for sale 
and for rental. 

The proposal, repeatedly urged 
on Congress by CIO and AFL, 
calls for the establishment of a 
National Mortgage Corporation 
for Housing Cooperatives, em- 
powered to sell $2 billion worth 
of bonds ^ on the private invest- 
ment market within the next 
two years. The proceeds would be 
used to make loans to genuine 
cooperatives and non-profit trusts 
for the construction of middle- 
income dwellings. 

Bona-fide non-profit trusts and 
cooperatives would be able to 
borrow 100% of construction cost, 
with up to 60 years in which to 
repay the Corporation and a low 


annual interest rate of approxi- 
mately 2%%. 

In addition, technical aid and 
advice on planning and design 
would be available, and applicants 
also would be able, on approval 
of the Corporation, to borrow up 
to 3% of the estimated total con- 
struction cost in order to pay 
architects, and meet other neces- 
sary preliminary costs. 

The total out-of-pocket expense 
to the taxpayer would be the 
$100 million requested to set up 
the Corporation. 

T he proposal is staggering 
in its potential effect on the 
present-day housing market, 
which has virtually left the mid- 
dle-income group out in the cold. 
It removes the real estate spec- 
ulator from the picture, and the 
interest rates and amortization 
period are so favorable that, in 
the opinion of qualified experts, 
families now paying around $90 
a month, either in mortgage and 
tax payments or in rentals, would, 
if the program goes through, be 
able to secure identical or better 
accommodations for between $45 
and $60 a month. 

Both House and Senate Bank- 
ing Committees have been asked 


to hold immediate hearings on 
the proposition, and fast action 
is expected. It is possible that 
the proposal will come to a vote 
within a month. 

The program is designed to 
meet the objections of those who 
do not want to see the govern- 
ment engaged in large-scale di- 
rect outlays for housing, since 
the required capital would be 
raised on the private investment 
market through sale of securities 
carrying a 100% government 
guarantee. 

It has powerful congressional 
support, and with strong White 
House backing its chances for 
approval this session are im- 
proved. The real estate lobby is 
expected to train its biggest guns 
on the program, and the cry of 
“socialism'' will again be raised. 

T he idea for federal support 
and supervision of privately- 
financed loans for cooperative 
housing has been under study 
for a long time, and has been 
gaining increasing favor as in- 
terested legislators have exam- 
ined the experiences of large- 
scale cooperative building ven- 
tures in other countries and of 
“pilot*' cooperatives here, includ- 


ing several started by CIO locals. 

(In Sweden, under a similar pro- 
gram, the construction industry is 
flourishing and approximately 70% 
of Swedish homes are cooperative- 
owmed.) 

CIO was among the first to 
advocate such an arrangement. 
At both 1948 and 1949 conven- 
tions, strong resolutions were 
passed calling for direct federal 
support of building cooperatives. 
The 1949 resolution said: 

“Sixty per cent of America's 
families whose incomes fall be- 
tween $25(X) and $5(XK) a year are 
the forgotten people in terms of 
basic housing needs.” It then 
asked Congress to fix a goal of 
2 million new homes a year, called 
on cities and states to supple- 
ment the federal program, and 
asked that Congress “adopt the 
REA principle for cooperative 
housing providing direct govern- 
ment loans at low rates of inter- 
est to be amortized over the life 
period of the house as provided 
in the Sparkman bill, S. 2246.” 

The Sparkman bill, introduced 
by Senator John Sparkman (D. 
Ala.), and presently on the Sen- 
ate calendar awaiting action, pro- 
vides direct federal loans to co- 
ops and non-profit trusts, as 


asked in the CIO resolution, but 
the establishment of the proposed 
National Mortgage Corporation 
with its private financing feature 
is regarded as preferable although 
the CIO continues to support the 
Sparkman measure. 

The housing law passed in 1949 
calls for construction of 810,0()0 
low-income units of public hous- 
ing within six years, for slum 
clearance, and for the beginnings 
of a farm building program, and 
was strongly supported and 
warmly received in labor circles. 

The new proposal, however, hits 
even nearer home, since most 
trade union members make too 
much money to be eligible for 
the publicly-financed housing pro- 
vided in the 1949 bill. Announce- 
ment that the new “co-op” bill 
has been introduced is expected 
to start a flurry of activity in 
labor circles, aimed at forming 
building cooperative^ and draw- 
ing up plans and blueprints. 

The new proposal emerged in 
its present form from the Con- 
ference on Middle Income and Co- 
operative Housing, held in Wash- 
ington Dec. 16 under the auspices 
of the Cooperative League and at- 
tended by representatives of CIO 
and AFL. 


Pay Cutting Drive 
Halted By TWUA 


75c Is Too Much To 


Betsy Ross, so history tells it, 
made the first American flag to 
stand as a symbol in the fight of 
the colonists against the tyranny 
and oppression of England. 

Members of the CIO Textile 
Workers who work at the Betsy 
Ross Throwing Co. in Blakely, Pa., 
recently struck a blow against ex- 
ploitation when they walked out 
of the plant and thereby halted a 
wage-cutting drive in the area. 

The strike was called off when 
the company agreed to recognize 
TWUA and to restore a 15c an 
hour wage cut imposed last April. 
It also agreed to a union shop and 
a six-month wage reopening 
clause. 

REA To Issue Loans 
For Rural Telephones 

The big job of getting adequate 
telephone service into farm homes 
is moving forward, says the Co- 
operative News Service. 

The Rural Electrification Ad- 
ministration, which was author- 
ized by Congress to lend $25 mil- 
lion for the first year to get new 
and improved service extended, 
has issued application forms for 
the use of those seeking loans. 

Congress instructed the REA 
to get assurance in making loans 
that “service to be furnished or 
improved ... be made available 
to the widest practical number 
of rural users.” 


The giant Western Union 
Telegraph monopoly is trying:^ 
to wriggle out of the 75c min- 
imum requirement made into 
law by the last session of Con- 
gress. 

In a hearing before the Labor 
Dept.'s Wage and Hour Division 
last week, WU complained that 

Dewey Would Cut 
U. S. Aid To States 

Gov. Thomas E. Dewey of New 
York is plugging for a surrender 
of taxing power by the Federal 
Government to the States of about 
one billion dollars so that Federal 
aid to the States could be cut by 
that much. 

The net result of the change 
would be to make the States more 
independent of the Federal gov- 
ernment, so that the wealthier 
states such as New York would 
run their own welfare programs. 
Only the poorer states would con- 
tinue to get federal grants and 
therefore be subject to minimum 
standards fixed by the Federal 
government. 

This would result in much 
greater variability in welfare pro- 
grams among the States, and in 
most cases much lower standards, 
because the State legislatures are 
notoriously slow in social legisla- 
tion. 


Hawaiian Sugar Workers’ 
Wages Are Tied To Market 


About 20,000 Hawaiian sugar 
workers, members of the left-wing 
CIO Longshoremen's union, had 
better be good with figures arith- 
metic that is — if they want to be 
able to calculate their wage cor- 
rectly- in the future. 

As a result of a recent 20-month 
contract signed by the union with 
the Hawaiian sugar industry, the 
wages they get will be tied to 
and vary with prices on the New 
York sugar market. 

The wage-price formula, first 
proposed by employers, sets an 


80c floor on wages — 5c more than 
the industry wanted. If raw sugar 
prices sag on the fluctuating New 
York market wages will go down 
at the same rate until the 80c 
floor is reached. 

On the other hand, if raw sugar 
prices rise, wages will go up from 
the present 83c-per-hour level. 
The rate of rise or fall has been 
calculated to be 1^/^c-an-hour for 
each $2 a ton change in raw sugar 
price. 

The Hawaiian sugar locals of 
ILWU accepted the plan on the 
advice of Pres. Harry Bridges. 


it couldn't possibly pay its mes- 
senger boys all that money. 

WU ofiicials who testified at the 
hearing asked that the minimum 
remain at the present 65c level. A 
10c increase they claimed, would 
cost them more than $1 million, 
force them to lay off 854 mes- 
sengers, and substitute telephone 
service and other mechanized 
ways of cutting down on mes- 
senger service. 

Irving Levy, CIO Auto Workers 
counsel, who represented the Na- 
tional CIO at the hearings, ac- 
cused WU of trying to get a sub- 
sidy from underprivileged kids. 
He termed their claims an empty 
threat, pointing out that they had 

Union Takes 
Off-Season 
Cut In Pay 

A n 11% off-season wage cut 
has been agreed to be the 
CIO Fur and Leather Workers 
for its 12,000 members in New 
York City. 

The cut for slack seasons dates 
back 30 years but was abandoned 
during the war. , 

“The agreement provides for a 
wage differential during the off 
season between Jan. 1 and June 
16,” said Dr. Louis M. Loeb, chair- 
man of the fur industry's con- 
ference committee. 

“The association (representing 
employers) and union representa- 
tives have agreed that the off-sea- 
son differential shall be 11%, 
which will be restored on June 16, 
1950, in accordance with the 
terms of the agreement of May 
1948.” 

The union said the “two-wage 
system” went into effect 30 years 
ago and that prior to the union's 
1948 strike the industry had the 
“right to fire any worker who re- 
fused to accept the differential 
imposed by the employer.” 

After the strike, the union said, 
it was agreed that the off-season 
rate would be determined jointly 
by the union and association. 


Pay — WU 


made similar claims in 1938 and 
again several years later, when 
they asked for exemption from 
the minimum rate. They were 
turned down both times, and their 
dire predictions fell flat. 

Representatives from the AFL 
Commerical Telegraphers Union 
and the CIO American Communi- 
cations Assn., also attended the 
hearings. Several members of the 
ACA, union representative for WU 
messengers in New York City, 
testified that their take-home pay 
is only $23 a week and that they 
have to supply their own uniforms 
and pay for their own bicycle re- 
pairs. They are docked if a mes- 
sage takes longer to deliver than 
the office manager thinks it 
should, they said. 


3 Firms Accused 
Of Monopoly 

A conspiracy to monopolize the 
manufacture and sale of seamless 
hosiery machinery and unlawfully 
restraining domestic and foreign 
commerce in such machinery is 
charged in a civil anti-trust suit 
filed in New York City by the 
government against Scott & Wil- 
liams, Inc., Laconia, N. H., its 
president, and two leading Brit- 
ish manufacturers. 

The suit charges tfie Laconia 
firm acquired the assets of an 
important competitor, dismantled 
the machinery, acquired and sup- 
pressed inventions, misused pat- 
ents to coerce competitors and 
eliminate competition, and en- 
tered into cartel agreements with 
the two British firms for alloca- 
tion of world markets. 



N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 9, 1950 


3 


Reds Turned Reporter Into Red-Baiter . 

Their Lying, Cheating, Trickery And Disregard For Democratic Procedures Swung Newsman Into ‘Anti’ Group 


By ALLAN L. SWIM 

T his is the simple story of why I 
became a Red-baiter and how I 
became a Red-hater, 

It is a story without a dramatic begin- 
ning. It contains no startling chapters. No- 
where in it is there a cloak-and-dagger 
episode. 

If the story is important, it is so not 
because it concerns me, but because it 
illustrates some of the techniques, some of 
the deviltry and some of the cunning of 
the Communists. 

And perhaps it contains information of 
v^ie to CIO members who are trying to 
throw the lefties out of their unions. 

I N THE LATE ’30’s most of the news- 
papers in my section of the country 
carried stories and editorials which implied 
that every person who wore a CIO button 
took orders direct from Moscow. 

As a labor reporter I met a number of 
the “dangerous Reds” in the rapidly-grow- 
ing new labor organization and found them 
to be ordinary, decent guys who knew 
little about Marx and Lenin and cared less. 

For a time I was almost convinced there 
were no Communists in the labor move- 
ment. I told myself, “If these fellows are 


Commies, like the papers say, then there's 
nothing wrong. with Communism.” 

Before long, however, I met some gen- 
uine party-liners and I began learning — 
slowly — how they operated. 

■THERE WAS THE big fellow who served 
■ a stretch in prison on a dynamiting 
charge. He seemed to get a kick out of 
waving his pardon with one hand and a 
fistful of CIO literature with the other. 

He talked to me about the “class strug- 
gle,” about the desirability of “striking 
every plant in town just to show them ^ 
they can’t keep their heels on the workers’ 
necks.” 

He almost wrecked a good union. 

Then there was the skinny little punk 
who talked conspiratorily about creating a 
Southern “Black Belt.” His scheme was to 
use the Negro to overthrow capitalism by 
force. He wanted to start a bloody revolt. 

And then there was the clever news- 
paper man who earned a fat salary by 
writing things which pleased his reaction- 
ary publisher and at the same time quietly 
advocated control of all newspapers and 
radio stations by a “people’s government.” 

A S TIME PASSED 1 ran into many 
strange characters who preached com- 


munism, but denied they belonged to the 
CP. 

I saw the Commie “party girls” work on 
unsuspecting delegates at Newspaper Guild 
conventions. They would promise almost 
anything in return for a vote. 

At industrial union council meetings over 
which I presided, a few Commies attempted 
time and again to thwart the will of the 
majority by parliamentsiry trickery. They 
showed an almost complete disregard for 
democratic procedures unless they stood 
to gain from them. 

The thing which most baffled me and 
caused me to feel the most disgust was 
the manner in which the Reds kept pace 
with flip-flops in the party line. 

We spent months beating down those 
“The Yanks Aren’t Coming” resolutions. 
Then we fought equally hard to keep the 
CP lads and lassies from “launching” a 
second front. 

A S A REPORTER who had covered po- 
lice and courthouse beats I had be- 
come accusto-med to dealing with persons 
who lied and cheated. 

But, unlike the criminals, the Commies 
frequently tried to justify morally their 
lying and cheating. It was “anything for 
the cause.” 


And so I became a Red-baiter in self de- 
fense and in defense of the things I 
thought were good and decent. 

My healthy hatred of communism didn’t 
develop until after the war— until the CP 
o-penly revealed it was embarked on a 
worldwide totalitarian conquest. 

Hitler-like behavior didnjt look any bet- 
ter under the hammer and sickle than 
under the swastika. 

And I could find no justification for the 
killing, the forced labor, the political exil- 
ing that went into the making of the “new 
order.” 

Y es, this is a personal story — perhaps 
a bit too personal, too sketchy, too 
ordinary. 

It’s not the startling story of a man who 
“suddenly saw the light” because of some 
dramatic double-cross by the Commies. 

But perhaps it throws some light on the 
reason for the Red-baiting which goes on 
in this column. 

If you’re human and you believe that 
this country of ours is a pretty good place, 
despite all its faults, you eventually rebel 
against those who engage in double-deal- 
ing and chicanery in an effort to further 
the cause of communism. 


State of the Union 

We had the feeling while listening to President Truman’s 
address at the reopening of Congress that we’d heard the same 
speech before. 

To us this was good. Very good. 

It meant the President was still hewing to the line he advo- 
cated when the 81st Congress opened its first session. It was 
a line which we heartily approved then — and which we still 
approve. 

The President, in shorj:, asked Congress to put into effect 
those portions of the Fair Deal program which it did not enact 
during 1949. ^ 

This program, he said several times during his talk, is de- 
signed to benefit the many — not the privileged few. 

Yes, his speech sounded good. 

It sounded good to the voters during the 1948 Presidential 
campaign; he said the same things but used somewhat different 
words. 

It sounded good when he addressed the first session of the 
present Congress. 

That is, it sounded good to us and, we believe, to a majority 
of the American people. 

But it must have had a sour sound for the Dixiegop coalition 
— that group of Republicans and Southern Democrats which 
seems to have high disregard for the will of the people as 
reflected by the election returns. 

We wouldn’t be a bit surprised if this coalition does every- 
thing in its power to stymie the Fair Deal. 

But we wouldn’t be a bit surprised either, if the other mem- 
bers of Congfess push through a good portion of the Truman 
program. 

fliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiminin 

Congress of Industrial Organizations 

Philip Murray, President James B. Carey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vice Presidents: Joseph A. Beirne, L. S. Buckmaster, Joseph Curran, 
John Green, Allan S. Haywood, O. A. Knight, Walter P. 
Reuther, Emil Rieve, Frank Rosenblum. 

Allan L Swim, Editor and Publicity Director 

Assistant Publicity Director: Henry C. Fleisher 
Assistant Editors: Hollace Ransdeil, Fred Ross, Arthur Riordan, (On Leave), 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark, William Weiss 
Business Manager: Richard E. Bauer 

Editorial Office, 718 Jackson Place, N. W., Washington 6, D. Ci 

Entered as Second Class Matter, Post Office, Washington. 0. C. 

Under the Act of Aug. 24, 1912 and Feb. 28. r92S. 

Vol. XIII January 9, 1950 ‘ No. 2 


Lehman To Avoid ^^Excesses Of Regionalism"^ 


P LEDGING himself to avoid the 
“excesses of regionalism,” Sen. 
Herbert H. Lehman (D-Liberal, 
N. Y.) told reporters after he took 
the oath of ofiice that he inter- 
preted his election as a mandate 
to use “the powers of the federal 
government to advance the gen- 
eral welfare of the people.” 

Lehman, who with the help of 
the CIO and AFL defeated John 
Foster Dulles in a hotly contested 

Unions Join In 
^Rights’ Fight 

The civil rights committees of 
various CIO unions, including the 
Steelworkers, Rubber Workers, 
Auto Workers and the Amalga- 
mated Clothing Workers, will at- 
tend the National Emergency 
Civil Rights Mobilization Jan. 15- 
17 in Washington, D. C., accord- 
ing to Executive Sec. Roy Wilkins, 
kins. 

Wilkins said the conference, 
sponsored by 50 national church, 
labor, civic, fraternal and minor- 
ity group organizations, will fo- 
cus widespread attention on the 
impending fight for enactment of 
FEPC and other civil rights 
measures. 


Correction 

On Nov. 15, 1948, a story ap- 
pearing in The CIO Ne^s implied 
that the doctors of Richmond 
County, N. C., were discriminat- 
ing against striking textile work- 
ers. While there is in Richmond 
County, as elsewhere in the na- 
tion, a shortage of doctors, inves- 
tigation by CIO representatives 
failed to reveal any deliberate 
discrimination against the strik- 
ers. 

In fairness to the Richmond 
County Medical Association this 
correction is published. 

Doesn’t Want Post 

Welter White, on leave. as exec- 
utive secretary of the National 
Association for the Advancement 
of Colored People, does no-t want 
to consider appointment as gov- 
ernor of the Virgin Islands to 
succeed William H. Hastie, re- 
cently named federal judge. 


election to replace retired Sen. 
Robert Wagner, also a Democrat, 
said* he experienced “a real thrill” 
on taking his place in the Senate 
chamber. 

He expressed hope that the Sen- 
ate would pass a social security 
bill even more extensive than that 
voted by the House. He said he’d 
follow his campaign pledges to 
back civil rights legislation, to 
work for Taft-Hartley repeal, for 
federal rent control, more liberal 
displaced persons legislation, and 
enactment of a middle-income "co- 
op housing bill. 

He revealed also that he would 
work for public power and naviga- 
tion development of the St. Law- 


rence and Niagara rivers. tJovern-, 
mental economies, he observed, 
should not be “at the cost of dis- 
sipating our true national wealth 
— the health and well-being of our 
people.” 

As he’s done “several hundred 
times since I was elected,” Leh- 
man declined to comment on 
whether he’d run for re-election 
next November, when his term 
expires. 

Also sworn in were Sen. William 
Benton (D, Conn.) and Darby (R, 
Kans.) and the newest members 
of the House, Mrs. Edna Kelly 
(D, N. Y.) and Jack Shelley, (D, 
Cal.) who is also president of the 
Cal. Federation of Labor. (LPA.) 



^^Now there is a guy who has taken a job where you have to 
watch your step,^' 


4 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 9, 1950 


N 


Becoming ‘Experts’ 
Paid Off, And 
Then-- 

I T LOOKED like an impossible situ- 
ation when the organizers made 
their first survey. 

Nearly all of the workers at the plant 
liye^d out in the country — in homes scat- 
tered over a wide area. 

The* buses which took them to and from 
York loaded and unloaded on company 
property, well back of the fence which 
' surrounded the mill. 

Visiting the emplbyes at their homes 
would have required miles and miles of 
driving through unfamiliar territory. 

And you can*t “handbill” a plant by 
tossing leaflets through the windows of 
^Soving buses. 

ORGANIZER in charge of the proj- 
■ ect was one of those fellows who 
Operates on the theory that “nothing is 
impossible.” 

He started looking for an opening 
wedge — for some method of getting in 
contact with plant workers. 

He heard, indirectly that the employes 
had much difficulty filling out their in- 
come tax returns and that they thought 
tfey were being overcharged for the help 
they received from the town’s tax experts. 

He did a bit of checking on the report, 
found it to be true, then called his col- 
leagues together. 

“Maybe you guys don’t know much 
about income taxes but you’re going to 
learn— and you’re going to learn in a 
^lurry,” he said. 

The group bought copies of “How To 
JB’ile An Income Tax Return” and other 
material on the subject and studied it 
diligently. 

O NE DAY, early in the “income tay^ 
season,” the local radio station carried 
announcements which were of considerable 
interest to mill employes. 

The announcer said that any worker 
who was having trouble Ailing out his tax 
Return could get expert assistance if he 
vrould go to a certain local address. 

The address was the headquarters of 
<he CIO organizers. 

A few workers showed up the next day. 
hey got their returns filled out quickly 
..d accurately. 

And each one got a handful of printed 
aterial dealing with the CIO. 

Each day the nuniber of “tax visitors” 
hcreased, and at times as many as 40 per- 
s were in the waiting line. 

t this point .the organizers began show- 
ing union movies to the waiting visitors. 

S MARCH 15 drew near, the rush in- 
^ creased — and so did the number of 
CIO union application cards. 

Then the organizers heard that there 
were a number of women workers who 
wanted expert tax advice but were unable 
tcj visit their headquarters. They had to 
i'ush home to take care of their children. 

So a baby-sitting service was put into 
operation. 

' “We'll come out and care for the kids 
while you get your return fixed up,” the 
organizers would say. 

The idea caught on quickly — and senti- 
ment for the union grew. 

Finally a majority of those at the plant 
had signed CIO cards and a petition for 
an election was filed. 

|NE, OF THE men who took part in 
^ the campaign said later, “That was 
ihe darndest drive I was ever in. 

^ won the election by a fair mar- 

gin — and maybe that should^ be the end 
0 ^ the story but it isn’t. 

“Quite a few people who had no con- 
nection with the mill came^ in to take 
advantage of our free tax service — and 
;?arn near every CIO representative in 
life state got the idea we’d be delighted 
io handle their returns for them. 

“Brother, they nearly worked our socks 

A. L. S. 


FOLKS’ SONG! 


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TUC Seeks Unity of Unions In Each Industry 


By ALLAN FLANDERS 

‘"THE alarmingly chaotic form of British 
trade union organization is part of 
the heritage which has come down from 
the 18th and early 19th centuries; it is one 
of the penalties of an ancient lineage.” 

This was the comment of W. Milne 
Bailey, one of the shrewdest students of 
the trade union movement who, until his 
early death in 1935 was the head of the 
Research and Economic Department of 
Britain’s Trades Union Congress. 

The organization of Britain’s trade un- 
ions has indeed never been planned or pro- 
moted by the government or by any par- 
ticular political party, nor, for that matter, 
by any central body of their own making, 
although the Trades Union Congress has 
helped to facilitate negotiations for amal- 
gamations and for various forms of closer 
unity. 

|%EING A voluntary movement, Britain’s 
” trade unionism is composed of varied 
types of organization. Some are very large 
and some are very small. Some are con- 
fined to craftsmen, even to craftsmen in 
one locality. Some started as industrial 
unions while others, originally formed by 
the amalgamation of Craft unions, gradu- 
ally opened their doors to any workers en- 
gaged in the same industries. 

There are also the two so-called general 
workers’ unions, whose strength is drawn 
from a wide range of industries.. Given 
this untidy pattern, the problem is to se- 
cure joint action among the unions con- 
cerned with any one industry in negotia- 
tions or other matter of mutual concern 
in regard to that industry. The federa- 
ttions were formed to meet that need; 


About Author 

This article was written by Allan 
Flanders, Senior Lecturer in Industrial 
Relations, Oxford University, and formerly 
Research Assistant to Britain’s Trade 
Union Congress. 


they are, in effect, a loose form of indus- 
trial unionism. 

The oldest of them is the Printing and 
Kindred Trades Federation, which was 
formed in 1899. All the 16 unions con- 
cerned with this industry, including the 
National Union of Journalists, are aflBiliat- 
ed to the Federation. The Printing Joint 
Industrial Council, composed of 40 unions 
and 40 employers’ representatives with al- 
ternating chairmen, provides a fertile field 
for joint union activity through the Fed- 
eration on such matters as apprenticeship 
selection and training, employment and 
production, and the strengthening of or- 
ganization on both sides of the industry. 

This federation has, however, little say 
in wage negotiations, which are mainly 
conducted by the separate unions. The 
latter also reserve to themselves the right 
to fix their own apprenticeship quotas. An 
unsuccessful attempt was made in 1949 on 
the part of the Federation to work out 
common proposals for a new wage struc- 
ture for the industry. 

^|NE OF THE most highly developed 
federations is the National Federation 
of Building Trade Operatives, which in- 
cludes all unions with a marked interest 
in building and construction. In this in- 
dustry there are still a large number of 


separate craft unions, the woodworkers, 
the bricklayers, the painters, the plumbers, 
the plasterers, and so on, all having their 
own organizations. 

But national wage negotiations are con- 
ducted mainly by the Federation, which 
has its own full-time regional officers and 
the authority to call out on strike any of 
its affiliated membership without prior 
consultation with the individual unions. 

The Confederation of the Shipbuilding 
and Engineering Unions is the largest of 
all the federations, with some 40 affiliated 
unions representing over two million 
workers. For many years it did not in- 
clude the largest union in the industry, 
the Amalgamated Engineering Union, but 
with the affiliation of this body in 1947 
the Confederation is now fully representa- 
tive of the unions in this whole complex 
of industries. 

It undertakes wage negotiations with 
the employers’ federation on behalf of all 
its affiliated unions and has produced pro- 
posals for the reform of the wage struc- 
ture of the industry. 

Unfortunately the two federations which 
exist in cotton and woolen textiles are 
weaker and looser organizations. The 
Northern Counties Textile Trades Federa- 
tion only represents the workers in the 
manufacturing section of cotton textiles, 
and the “Amalgamations” which are af- 
filiated to it are in turn composed of local 
associations with their own rules and 
scales of contributions and benefits. 

The integration of industrial policy has 
also been helped forward by the existence 
of Joint Industrial Councils in many in- 
dustries, which act mainly as permanent 
negotiating bodies between the various 
unions concerned and the employers. 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 9, 1950 





As Congress Opens 


PRESIDENT TRUMAN discusses the main 
points of his state of the union address with 
Congressional leaders at the White House 
^an. 3 a short time before the opening of the 
second session of the 81st Congress. Vice 


Pres. Alben Barkley is seated at the right. 
In rear (left to right) are Senate Majority 
Leader Scott Lucas (D. 111.) ; House Speaker 
Sam Rayburn (D. Tex.) and House Majority 
Leader John W. McCormack (D. Mass.). 



Only new members of the House, Rep. 
John Shelley (D. Cal.) and Rep. Edna F. 
kelly (D. N. Y.) look over House rules and 
panual before opening of second session of 
jBlst Congress. Both won special elections to 


replace Congressmen who died during their 
terms of office. The Senate has three new 
members. They are Herbert H. Lehman (D. 
N. Y.), William Benton (D. Conn.) and Harry 
Darby (R. Kan.). 


\ 

Drive Started Far D, C. Home Rule 


»HE WASHINGTON Chapter 
of Americans for Democratic 
Action has begun a concerted 
drive to get the necessary 218 
^natures on a petition to dis- 
charge the House District of 
^lumbia Committee, at present 
Washington’s c i t y council,” 
from further consideration of 
me limited home rule measure 
which it tabled last session. 

j^he measure, which provides 
oh}y that the citizens of the 
I^strlct may elect their own. 
city "council and does not allow 


them to vote in federal elections, 
was passed by the Senate but 
has met stiff opposition in the 
House committee, which is dom- 
inated by southern Democrats 
who are not anxious to see 


i 


To Stop Dixiegops 
In ’50 

A Buck For PAG 
Is Nifty 

THE CIO NEWS, JANIJABY 9, 1950 


the beginnings of equal rights 
in the nation’s capital. 

The ADA, chapter’s first ef- 
forts netted 60 signatures, but 
according to a spokesman, ”toil 
ind tears” will be necessary 
to get the tot^l to 218. 

^ “Those who enjoy the right 
to vote can help the silenced 
D. C. resident,” ADA explains. 
“They can write to their Rep- 
resentatives asking that Con- 
gress grant the District of Co- 
lumbia \the right to elect its 
own city council and its own 
Board of Education.” 


Dixiegops Play Sa 
As Election Casts 


By HENRY C. FLEISHER 

T here are 302 days 

until elections — but that 
coming event will throw ^a 
heavy shadow over the sec- 
ond session of the 81st Con- 
gress. 

Trooping back to a renovated, 
“streamlined” House chamber in 
the Capitol, Representatives and 
Senators heard President Tru- 
man call once again for enact- 
ment of the Fair Deal prograip. 
' No sooner had the President 
finished than the Dixiecrat— Re- 
publican coalition got back to 
the same brand of politics they 
were practicing when Congress 
adjourned in October. 

Sen. Wherry (R. Nebr.), GOP 
leader in the Senate,^ called the 
speech a “dud.” 

Rep. Joseph Martin (R. Mass.), 
GOP leader in the Housd^ 
offered the opinion that the 
address on the ’ State of the 
Union should be re-titled “the 
state of socialism.” 

Sen. Taft (R., Ohio), thought 
the speech advocated measures 
which “would destroy freedom” 
and “would give special priv- 
ileges to labor union bosses.” 

T WO SOUTHERN Democrats 
generally agreed with the 
GOP line. Sen. McClellan (D. 
Ark.) moaned that the Truman 
proposals looked like “increased 
taxes and increased deficits.” 

Sen. Russell (D. Ga.), a lead- 
ing Dixiecrat, thought the Tru- 
man objectives “praiseworthy in 
themselves” but added quickly 
that measures asked by Pres. 
Truman would lead at once to a 
“purely socialistic state.” 

And throughout the country, 
editorials in the big papers — the 
same papers that predicted the 
election of Tom Dewey — echoed 
the Dixiegop criticism. 

B ut CIO PRES. Murray hailed 
the speech as a “liberal call 
to action” — and suggested that 
Congress should act quickly to 
“enact these proposails into law. 
They are long overdue.” 

“All of the measures recom- 
mended by the President are 
‘must’ legislation. They are im- 
peratively required for the gen- 
eral welfare of the American 
people.” 

Other labor and liberal organ- 
izations joined in calling for 
quick action on the sizeable col- 
lection of “unfinished business” 
facing the Congress. 


D. D. Smith Added 
To CIO-PAC Staff 

CIO-PAC Dir. Jack Kroll 
has announced the appointment 
of Darrell D. Smith to the 
Washington PAC staff. Smith 
will work out of the national 
office, concentrating on the 
middle west. 

A veteran unionist, Smith 
has been a business agent for 
a teamsters’ local, a newspaper 
man, an organizer in steel, a 
government official and a polit- 
ical action worker. 

Or,iginally from Canton, 
Ohio, he ran for mayor 6f the 
town after the 1937 “little 
steel” strike, but was beaten 
because he refused to indorse 
a strikebreaking governor. His 
latest political action stint was 
in Minnesota during the 
Humphrey campaign against 
Joe Ball. 


Truman Gives ^ 
Call To Action’-- 

C IO PRES. MURRAY .liked the Presi 
Union Message, and suggested to C 
on with the job of turning proposals into I 
statement : 

“The CIO hails* President Truman’s 
Message as a liberal call to action. The 
cated in forthright and unmistakable te^ 
business’ of the 81st Congress. 

“The American people, for whom 
spoken, expect the Congress to enact these 
They are long overdue. The measures 
President have been the subject of ample 
and throughout the nation ; they have ' 
proved by the voters at the polls, as recen 
elections in New York State. 

“These proposals can and should be 
session of the Congress. The public will 
on any scheme prompted by petty politic^ 
adjourn this session of the Congress bef 
program has been substantially enacted. 
IlWHE CIO, representing millions of 
I entirely with President Truman t^ 
perity is dependent upon widespread s] 
benefits by all the people rather than m 
few. Our nation was founded upon this 
cratic principle to which organized labo 
dedicated. 

“The CIO looks with approval on thg^ 
recognition of the important and wholeso. 
bargaining in our national life. We app 
man’s vigorous and renewed demand for 
If Congress heeds the will of the people 
President’s message, Taft-Hartley repeal^ 
at this session of the Congress. 

“All of the measures recommended 
‘must’ legislation. They are imperativ 
general welfare of the American people. 


Some of the key issues facing 
the Congress, with Pres. Tru- 
man’s recommendations on 
them: 

1. T-H REPEAL: 

Truman: “. . . Free collective 
bargaining must be protected 
and encouraged. Collective bar- 
gaining is not only a funda- 
mental economic freedom for 
labor. It is also a strengthen- 
ing and stabilizing influence for 
our whole economy. 

’“The federal statute now gov- 
erning labor relations [Taft- 
Hartley] is punitive in purpose 
and one-sided in operation. This 
statute is’, and always has been, 
inconsistent with the practice of 
true and effective collective bar- 
gaining. It should be repealed 
and replaced by a law that is 
fair to all. and in harmony with 
our democratic ideals.” 

Murray: “If Congress heeds 
the will of the people as ex- 
pressed in the President’s mes- 
sage, Taft-Hartley repeal can be 
accomplished at this session of 
'Congress.” 

2. RENT CONTROL: 

* Truman: “Rent control is still 
necessary to prevent widespread 
hardship ... I recommend, 
therefore, that rent control be 
continued for another year.” 

The present rent control law 
expires on June 30, but funds 
for enforcement of that law are 
almost exhausted. Congress will 
soon be asked for an ‘additional 
appropriation to keep it going. 

Meanwhile, loopholes in the 
law and weak enforcement pol- 
icies have led to widespread lift- 


ing of 
raising 
of the c< 

3. SOC 
Trum'' 
that the 
action a* 
lation 
and ex 
age and 
The wide 
provide p® 
dustry 
improveme 
surance sy 
Social 
were pass 
in the (se 
action In^ 
increases 
million pe 


Boost 

Ext 

Pres. 
Congress.' 
to the la 
bill. 

The 

supported 
governme 
facilities, 
conducte 
union an 

“A fxji: 
problems 
tions is 0 
I recom 
of a La 
to encour 
ities in 
man said 


N 



Old Game 
ng Shadow 



to 70%, and provides for dis- 
ability payments. 

Many observers believe that 
business groups — which have 
often opposed improving the so- 
cial security system in the past 
—may swing around as a result 
of recent pension agreements in 
CIO contracts. Increases in so- 
cial security benefits would cut 
cost of these pensions to the 
corporations. 

4. CIVIL RIGHTS: 

Truman: “I again urge the 
Congress to enact the civil 
rights proposals I made in Feb- 
ruarj^ 1948.” 

This is almost certain to lead 
to one of the talkiest, and sharp- 
est, debates of the second ses- 
sion. Principal civil rights 
measures — fair employment 
practices, anti-poll tax and anti- 
lynching — have moved through 
committees. Anti-poll tax bill 
has been passed by the House, 
but none of the three measures 
has yet received Senate ap- 
proval. 

Senate Democratic leaders ex- 
pect to bring the FEPC bill to 
the Seriate floor early in the 
session, perhaps in February. It 
is certain to produce a filibuster 
from the southern poll tax bloc. 

Some Republicans have been 
talking for the record by calling 
for immediate action— but a year 
ago they gave quiet support to 
the Dixiecrats’ successful fight 
against changed Senate rules 
which would have taken the fire 
out of the filibuster weapon. 

The President has also asked 
for action on other civil rights 
measures— statehood for Alaska 
and Hawaii, and for home rule 
for the District of Columbia. All 
of them were indorsed in the 
history-making report of “the 
President’s Committee on Civil 
Rights, on which CIO Secy.- 
Treas. James B. Carey was a 
leading member. 

The District of Columbia 
home rule bill has been passed 
in the Senate, but has stalled in 
the House. Liberal and labor 
groups in the capital have been 
seeking a discharge petition to 
blast the bill out of committee, 
but as yet it has only about 60 
of the required 218 signatures. 

5. NATURAL RESOURCES: 

Truman: “We need to enlarge 
the production and transmission 
of public power . . . We must 
continue policies to assure that 
their benefits will be spread 
among the many and not re- 
stricted to a favored few.” 

The President called for ac- 
tion not only on projects like 
the Columbia Valley Administra- 
tion — modeled along the lines of 
TVA — but^for similar programs 
in New England and on the St. 
Lawrence Seaway. Next day, the 
President told reporters he fore- 
sees an eventual project for the 
entire central state area, em- 
bracing programs for power, 
navigation and flood control on 
the Mississippi, Missouri and 
Ohio rivers. 

The public power projects 
have met furious objection from 
the utility lobbies, which also 
fought the TVA 15 years ago. 

yHE PRESIDENT’^ message 
■ also gave strong emphasis 
to the Brannan Plan, which 
would guarantee minimum farm 
incomes while cutting consumer 
prices on food; to helping “mid- 
dle income” families obtain bet- 
ter housing; to federal aid for 
education, which has already 
been approved in the Senate but 
was caught in a cross-wind in 
the House; to the national 


STATE 

Election C 

FINAL FILING DATES 

Calendar For 1! 

REGISTRATION 

150 

PRIMARIES 

♦ALA 

March 1, 1950 

1st and 3rd Mondays in each month. 

May 2. 1950 

May 30. 1950 (runoff) 

ARIZ 

J une 14. 1950 to Aug. 3. 1950 

For primary: Before Aug. 7. 1950. For general elec- 

tion: anytime until Oct. 2, 1950. 

Sept. 12. 1950 

♦ARK 

April 26. 1950 to June 15. 1950 

A 1948 constitutional amendment permits the legisla- 

ture to enact new registration laws. None passed as 
yet. 

July 25, 1950 

Aug. 8, 195() (runoff) 

CAL 

March 8. 1950 to April 7. 1950 

Through April 28, 1950 for primary; through Sept. 29, 

1950 for general. 

June 6, 1950 

COLO 

July 14 to 29. 1950 

Through Aug, 23, 1950, for primary; through Oct. 18, 

1950, for general. 

Sept. 12. 1950 

CONN 

Nominations by party conventions 
not later than Oct. 17. 1950. 

Oct. 14 to 21. 1950 throughout state. Additional dates: 

(See PAC 1948 book). 

None 

DEL 

Primary and party convention dates 

to be set by paKies. 

At least once each week in April, May and June, 1950. 

Also on July 12 and Oct. 21. 1950. 

Set by parties. 

FLA 

Feb. 1. 1950 

Through April 1, 1950, for primary; May 8 through 

Oct. 7, 1950. for general. 

May 2. 1950 

May 23. 1950 (runoff) 

GA 

Set by Democratic Committee. 

Fulton Co. (Atlanta) through May 6. 1950; rest of 
state through July 6. 

Sept. 13. 1950 

Oct. 4. 1950 (runoff) 

IDAHO 

June 9 to July 8. 1950. 

March 6, 1950, to Aug. 5, 1950 for primary; Aug. 12 to 
Nov. 4 for general. 

Aug. 8. 1950 

ILL 

Jan. 16 to 23. 1950 

Through March 13, 1950 for primai’y. April 14 to Oct. 
9. 1950 for general. (Cook County: also March 15-21 
and Oct. 11-17. 1950). 

April 11. 1950 

IND 

March 3 to April 1 1950 

Through April 3, 1950 for primary. May 15 to Oct. 9, 
1950 for general. 

May 2: 1950 

IOWA 

Varies locally, but not after May 26 for primary, Oct. 
28 for gerferal. (Cities over 10,000: re-registration for 
general on Oct. 26 and 27 and Nov. 4.) 

County offices : May 6. 1950. State 
and federal: April 6. 1950 

June 5. 1950 

KAN. 

June 20. 1950 

Through July 11, 1950, for primary; through Oct. 17, 
1950, for general. 

Aug. 1. 1950 

KY 

State offices: June 11. 1950. County 
offices; June 21. 1950 

Through June 15, 1950; reopens Aug. 16 to Sept. 16. 

Aug. 5, 1950 

LA....: 

July 24. 1950 

Through July 30, 1950. \ 

Aug. 29. 1950 

Oct. 3. 1950 (runoff) 

ME 

April 17. 1950 

For primary — varies by cities thru June. For General 
— varies by cities from Aug. 22 to Sept. 9. 

June 19. 1950 

General election: Sept. 11, 

19.50 

MD 

Baltimore and Montgomery County: through Aug. 11. 
plus Sept. 21 and 22. Elsewhere: through Aug. 11, plus 
Sept. 21-Oct. 7. 1950. 

Aug. 1, 1950 

Sept 11. 1950 

MASS 

Aug. 1. 1950 

Varies locally, but not after Aug. 18, for primary or 
Oct. 6, for general. 

Sept. 19. 1950 

MICH 

Through Aug. 23, 1950, for primary; through Oct. 18, 
1950. for general. 

July 18. 1950 - 

Sept. 12. 1950 

MINN 

Continuous through Aug. 22, 1950 (primary) and SepL 

14 to Oct. 17 (general). (No registration in towns of 
less than 15.000.) 

June 14 to Aug. 3. 1950 

Sept. 12. 1950 

•MISS 

Through July 6, 1950. 

June 9. 1950 

Aug. 8. 1950 

Aug. 29. 1950 (runoff) 

MO 

April 25. 1950 

Regulations vary, but registration is year round in 

all localities, with different closing dates before elec- 
tions. In St. Louis and Kansas City registration closes 
July 8, 1950 for primary and reopens from Aug. 7 to 
Oct. 14. 

Aug. 1. 1950 

MONT 

States offices: June 7, 1950. County 
offices: June 17, 1950 

Through June 3, 1950, for primary; through Sept. 22 
for general. 

July 18. 1950 

NEB 

June 29. 1950 

Through July 29, 1950, for primary; Aug. 9 to Oct. 
28 for general. 

Aug. 8. 1950 

NEV 

July 17. 1950 

Through Aug. 5. 1950; reopens Sept. 6 to Oct. 7. 

Sept. 5. 1950 

N. H 

July 29, 1950 

Dates vary locally (usually within a couple of weeks 
before the election). 

Sept. 12, 1950 

N. J... 

March 9. 1950 

Through March 9, 1950; r.eopens April 19 to Oct. 5, 
1950. 

April 18. 1950 

N. M 

April 4 to May 13, 1950 

Through May» 13, 1950; reopens June 12 thru Oct., 

7. 1950. 

June 6. 1950 

N. Y 

Aug. 8-15, 1950 

June 1 to Sept, 20. 1950. In addition: New York City 

and Westchester County: Oct. 9-13, 1950, 5:()Q-;10:30 
p. m. and Oct. 14, 1950, 7:00 a. m. -10:30 p. m. Cities of 
less than 5,000: Oct. 7. and Oct. 14. Cities of more than 
5.000: Oct. 6. 7,- 13, 10:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. and Oct. 14, 
7:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 

Sept. 19, 1950 

N. C 

State and federal offices: March 18, 
Others: April 15 

April 29-May 13, 1950. 

May 27. 1950 

June 24, 1950 (runoff) 

N. D 

April 28 to May 27, 1950 

June 20 and Oct. 31, 1950. None in towns less than 

1500. 

June 27. 1950 

OHIO 

Feb. 1. 1950 

Through April 3, 1950; reopens May 13 through Oct. 9, 

1950. 

May 2. 1950 

OKLA 

April 24-28, 1950 

Oct. 8-28. 1950. 

July 4. 1950 

July 25. 1950 (runoff) 

ORE 

March 10. 1950 

Before Oct. 7, 1950. 

May 19. 1950 

PA 

March 27. 1950 

Anytime except April 27-May 22 (for primary). Closing 

Sept. 18, 1950 (for general). 

May 16, 1950 

R. T 

July 22-31 and Aug. 23-28 (D) ; Sept. 
1-6, 1950 (R). 

Anytime up to June 30, 1950. 

D— Sept. 18. 1950 

R— Sept. 27. 1950 

♦S. C 

Set by Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee 

No primary registration. Regulations for general vary 

locally, but not after Oct. 7. 

July 11. 1950 

July 25. 1950 (runoff) 

S. D 

April 7-May 7. 1950 

Anytime except May 22-June 6 (for primary) and Oct. • 

31-Nov. 7 (for general election). 

June 6. 1950 

♦TENN 

June 10, 1950 

Varies locally; for primary not after July 14, 1950; 

through Oct. 18. 1950, for general. 

Aug. 3, 1950 

♦TEX 

State offices — June 5, 1950; District 
offices — May 5, 1950; County offices 
— June 19. 1950. 

None in Texas. 

July 22. 1950 

Aug. 26, 1950 (runoff) 

UTAH 

20 days before party convention 
(date to be set; usually In August) 

June 20, July 1, 25, Aug. 1, Oct. 10. 17. 31. Provision 

made for voters absent on regular registration days — 
anytime except 10 days preceding an election. 

Sept. 5, 1950 

VT 

Aug. 15. 1950 

Check list revised some time previous to 36 hours 

before an election — set by town clerk. 

Sept. 12. 1950 

*VA 

June 10, 1950 

Through July 8, 1950 (Municipal elections through May 

13. 1950). 

Aug. 8, 1950 

Municipal election — June 13, 

1950 

WASH 

July 1-30, 1950 

Anytime up to. Oct. 7, 1950. 

Sept. 12. 1950 

W. VA 

July 1. 1950 

Anytime up to Oct. 7. 1950. 

Aug. 1. 1950 

WIS 

July 25, 1950 

Through Sept. 7. 1950 for primary; through Oct. 26, 

1950 for general election. 

Sept. 19, 1950 

WYO 

♦Note on poll tax: 
Oct. 1, 1949, to vot 
election; Mississipp 
date, Oct. 7, 1950; 

July 23, 1950 

Alabama, Oct. 1, 1949, to Feb. 1, 195( 
e in primary or Oct. 1, 1950, to vot< 
li, final date, Feb. 1, 1950; South Ca 
Tennessee, final date. Sept. 8, 1950 

July 24-Aug. 21, 1950, for primary; Oct. 9-Nov.6 for 

general. 

3; Arkansas, election only); Texas, Oct. 1, 1949, t( 
2 in general date Dec. 12, 1949, to vote in the n 
irolina, final May 6, 1950, for primary and gener 
(for general 

Aug. 22, 1950 

3 Jan. 31, 1950; Virginia, final 
mnicipal elections; final date 
al elections. 


health insurance program; to 
improving the displaced persons 
law and to continuation of ECA. 

Such a program, which is cer- 
tain to arouse tremendous op- 
position from special interests, 
will need tremendous support 
from the public if a substantial 
portion of it is to be passed 
before Congress adjourns. 

But before the major issues 
arise, the Senate is already 
working on one item passed by 
the House — the bill to remove 
special, taxes on oleomargarine. 

The bill is supported by most 


city consumers, and by cotton 
state interests (cottonseed oil 
goes into oleo); it’s bitterly op- 
posed in the dairy sections 
(milk goes into butter). 

Under present law, colored 
oleo is taxed 10 cents a pound, 
and white oleo is taxed one- 
half a cent a pound; but manu- 
facturers and distributors must 
pay special license fees, which 
are higher for yellow oleo than 
for the uncolored product. 

So Congress starts with a bat- 
tle — the first of many this ses- 
sion. 


Read What Congressmen 
Read — CIO Voting Record 

About 500 Congressmen are reading the CIO News 1949 Voting 
Record. 

They find it mighty interesting. 

You will, too — for it’s your business. 

It’s the story of what happened to your legislative program during 
the first session of the 8.1st Congress. It shows how every Congressman 
voted on 13 issues, how every Senator voted on 16 key tests. 

You’ll find the CIO News 1949 Voting Record is “must” reading^—# 
and a handy reference source— during the months ahead. 

Send your orders now to the CIO Publication Dept., 718 Jackson 
Place, N. W., Washington 6, D. C. Prices: 5c a copy; 50 for $2.00; 100 
for $3.50; 500 for $14; 1,000 for $20. - 
Mail your order today. 

THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 9, 1960 


,7 


3rd Quarter Report Shows 1949 Profits 
Will Not Lag Far Behind 1948 Record 


A REPORT ON manufacturing profits for the 
third (Quarter of 1949, from the Federal Trade 
and the Securities and Exchange Commissions, sug- 
gests that corporation profits for last year will run 
not far behind the record-breaking total of 1948. 

The Commissions reported that in the third quar- 
ter, as a result of a relatively small increase in 
volume, manufacturing profits after taxes zoomed up 
15% over the second quarter, or from $2 billion to 
$2.3 billion. They still were 20% below the third 
quarter of last year, an exceptionally high profit 
period. 

Smaller corporations showed greater profit in- 


creases than big, in line with the greater fluctuations 
usually shown by the small companies both on down- 
sv/ings and upswings. Biggest gains were among man- 
ufacturers of miscellaneous products, leather and 
leather products, apparel and finished textiles and 
fabricated metal products, all of which showed gains 
of 50% or more. 

Profits after taxes, based on stockholders’ invest- 
ments, ranged from 27.2% for auto companies to 
5.6% for primary non-ferrous metal companies which 
traditionally show a low profit on invested capital. 
The percentage for big companies averaged 13.6%, 
for smaller ones 8.4%. (LPA) 


'All Jobs Are Terminated’ As N. Y. 
Sun Merges With World-Telly 


''O’Dwyer 
May Name 
Fact Board 

N ew YORK CITY Mayor 
William O’Dwyer prom- 
ised to answer “in a few days” 
a request by nine top CIO 
leaders that he name a fact- 
finding board to look into the 
dispute between the CIO 
Transport Workers and the 
N. Y. City Board of Trans- 
portation. 

The steering committee of the 
N. Y. CIO Council had urged 
that the fact-finders, if appointed, 
consider the union's demands for 
better wages, hours and working 
conditions for the 42,000 em- 
ployes of the municipal transit 
lines. . 

The CIO spokesmen, who rep- 
resent 500,000 members, were 
Louis Hollander, state CIO Coun- 
cil president; TWU Pres. Michael 
Quill; ACW Pres. Jacob Potof- 
sky; N. Y. City CIO Council 
Secy.-Treas. Morris lushewitz; 
Retail-Wholesale Pres. Irving 
Simon; Novelty Workers Secy.- 
Treas. Alex Bail; Utility Workers 
Reg. Dir. Patrick McGrath; NMU 
Pres. Joseph Curran and TWU 
Local 100 Pres. Matthew Guinan. 

P ENDING the Mayor’s answer, 
the group promised that there 
would be no slowdown or inter- 
ruption of service on municipal 
subway, bus and street car lines. 

Several of the CIO spokesmen 
indicated “off the record” their 
confidence that the mayor would 
agree to appoint a fact-finding 
group to study the issues. 

Previously TWU had asked the 
Board of Transportation to dis- 
cuss the union’s demand for a 
21c-an-hour pay boost, a 40-hour 
work week, machinery for griev- 
ance adjustment and other im- 
provements in working conditions 
on the municipal lines. 

W ILLIAM REID, Board of 
Transportation chairman, 
said the full program of TWU 
would cost the city $72 million 
and that the money was not 
available. The 40-hour week pro- 
vision alone would add $30 mil- 
lion to the annual payroll oj the 
transit agency, he claimed. He 
indicated that the city could not 
agree to accept an arbitrator’s 
decision. 

TWU Pres. Quill last week is- 
sued a statement condemning the 
stand taken by the N. Y. Times 
iSi editorially opposing the ap- 
pointment of a fact-finding board. 

“It is strange indeed,” Quill 
declared, “that despite the clamor 
of the press for transit stability, 
the N. Y. Times should reject 
the union’s proposal for a prac- 
tical step toward peace — a step, 
furthermore, which it applauded 
during the steel controversy. 

“Can it be that the N. Y. Times 
is afraid that a fact-finding board 
will uncover the true facts and 
recommend that the demands of 
the transit workers be granted?” 

100,000 Get Under 50c 
In Illinois — Annunzio 

An estimated 100,000 persons in 
Illinois are earning less than 50 
cents an hour, according to Frank 
Annunzio, director of the Illinois 
state Department of Labor. An- 
nunzio made the estimate while 
announcing plans for improving 
the present Illiriois miniinum 
wage law. The low pay rates 
are paid in small establishments 
not ordinarily covered by the 
usual wage study, Annunzio said. 


E mployes of the New York 
Sun, the city’s second oldest 
paper, founded in 1833, were 
stunned Jan. 4 when they found 
a notice on the bulletin board in- 
forming them that the Sun 
would cease publication that day. 

The paper had been sold and 
would be merged with the World- 
Telegram. 

With no more advance notice 
than that, the Sun’s editorial de- 
partment employes learned that 
their jobs were gone. “This is 
notice to all employes that all 
positions are terminated at the 
clofse of business, Wednesday, Jan. 
4, 1950,” the bulletin said. 

“It may be possible to use some 
employes temporarily, and these 
people will be so advised.” 

Employes crowed around read- 
ing the notice with amazement. 
They couldn’t believe it. Some 
who weren’t in the office when 
the announcement appeared, 
^eard the news over the radio. 
One man, who was shaving when 
his daughter told him what had 
come over the radio, said he felt 
like cutting his throat. 

A JOINT announcement of the 
sale of the Sun to the World- 
Telegram and the merger of the 
two papers was made the same 
day by Thomas W. Dewart, presi- 
dent of the The Sun, and Roy W. 
Howard, editor and president of 
the World-Telegram. 

Dewart’s statement in which he 


attributed the blame in part to 
“rising costs” of labor and “the 
demands of the unions,” brought 
a sharp reply from the New York 
Newspaper Guild. The union 
called the charges misleading, 
biased and unfair. Pointing out 
that The Sun was the only New 
York metropolitan paper whose 
editorial and commercial em- 
ployes are not covered by a Guild 
contract, the CIO union declared 
that The Sun had not given a 
wage increase in 1949 in any de- 
partment, and had not been faced 
with any increase in 1950. 


Exec. Vice-Pres. Thomas J. 
Murphy of the New York Guild, 
said that a Guild committee 



Union Pays Mortgage 
For Member’s Widow 


' A check for $2280 has been sent 
to Mrs. Hazel Farrell to pay the 
balance due on the mortgage on 
the Farrell home, by District 3, 
CIO Packinghouse Workers. Mrs. 
Farrell got another check for $250, 
and hereafter will get $100 a 
month. 

Her husband, William J. Far- 
rell, was killed by a strikebreaker 
on the picket line in the 1948 
strike at the Rath plant in Water- 
loo, Iowa. District 3 has reached 
the half-way mark in a drive for 
a Farrell Memorial Fund. 


planned to meet with the World- 
Telegram management to “find 
out their intentions regarding the 
over-all staff situation and to get 
guarantees that Guild members 
now working for The World-Tele- 
gram don’t get pushed out by non- 
Guild people from The Sun. We 
want to see the Sun people get 
jobs, but we don’t want Guild 
members to lose jobs.” 

Pres. Harvey Call of the Sun 
Editorial Employes Association, 
an independent union represent- 
ing 175 members, said its con- 
tracts and those of other unions 
with The Sun, had not been “out 
of line” with city-wide wage 
scales. He added that the manage- 
ment never made any plea for co- 
operation along the lines of eco- 
nomy. 

D ewart said that “the de- 
mands of the unions have 
wrought here in New York — what 
they are working elsewhere 
throughout the nation — an un-» 
precedented and increasing num- 
ber of casualties among news- 
papers which once were great 
and strong. 

“Despite continued warnings of 
the economic consequences vari- 
ous unions have forced and are 
continuing to force, higher wages, 
until, in the newspaper business 
as a whole, these have risen 
beyond reason.” 

Merger of the World-Telegram 
and Sun leaves only three regular 
evening papers in the nation’s 
largest city, The other two are 
the New York Post and the Jour- 
nal-American. The World-Tele- 
gram itself is the result of a mer- 
ger in 1931 of the World and the 
Telegram. The Post, founded in 
1801 by Alexander Hamilton, is 
the city’s oldest paper. 


D etroit will lose over $100 
million in federal funds un- 
less Mayor-elect Albert Cobo and 
the incoming City Council take 
immediate steps to build housing 
units on vacant land sites, charged 
James J. Inglis, executive direc- 
tor of the City’s Housing Com- 
mission, in a radio address on 
the CIO Auto Workers’ Station 
WDET-FM. 

“I feel very .strongly that the 
city’s best interests will be served 
by starting at once to develop 
new public housing ... on vacant 
land sites, so there will be places 
to move families who ar^ dis- 
placed frona future slum clear- 
ance projects . , Inglis de- 
clared. 

'The retiring housing director 
also pointed out that low-rent 
federal housing should be made 
available to “thousands of de- 
serving low-income families, who 
are living under deplorable con- 


CCL Says 
Govt. Hides 
Job Lack 

The Canadian Congress of 
Labour has called upon L. S. 
St. Laurent, the Canadian 
Prime Minister, and members 
of the Cabinet to look into 
the serious unemployment 
problem in Canada. 

In a letter to the prime min- 
ister, CCL Pres. A. R. Mosher 
said he had reason to believe 
that the number of unemployed 
persons in Canada now totals 
300,000 or 6% of the entire la- 
bour force. 

Mosher also asked that the 
government make public the lat- 
est unemployment figures. “For 
the last three months,” he said, 
“the regular report on claims for 
benefit under the Unemployment 
Insurance Act has been withheld. 
We are at a loss to understand 
why the government is appar- 
ently endeavouring to keep this 
important information from the 
publia 

“We have been repeatedly in- 
formed by the government that 
it has carefully-laid plans for 
taking care of a substantial in- 
crease in unemployment. We be- 
lieve the time has come for put- 
ting these plans into effect. The 
Canadian Labour movement is 
determined not to permit a rep- 
etition of the ‘Hungry Thirties’.” 

10 Auditors Uncover 
Taxable $2 Million 

Encouraged by the discovery 
of $2 million in taxable payrolls, 
which had previously been un- 
taxed, the Michigan Unemploy- 
ment Compensation Commission 
has authorized the hiring of an 
additional 15 field auditors to 
check the accounts of marginal 
employers. 

This sum was turned up by 10 
new auditors during the past six 
months. “Each man has turned 
in an average of five times as 
much ‘new’ payroll tax money 
from marginal accounts as his 
wages have cost us,” declared 
Harry C. Markle, MUCC executive 
director. The MUCC presently 
employs 45 auditors. 

Michigan employers of eight or 
more workers are taxed a certain 
percentage of total payrolls for 
the MUCC fund. ' 


ditions, but not necessarily in 
areas that will be selected for 
slum clearance.” 

He said this group included 
disabled veterans, old people liv- 
ing on small pensions or savings, 
widows and others 

As housing director, Inglis has 
prepared plans which would give 
Detroit 10,000 units on 12 sites, 
distributed about evenly in out- 
lying areas and congested slums. 
The program would be financed 
under provisions of the housing 
act passed by the 81st Congress 
calling for the construction na- 
tionally of 810,000 units in six 
years. 

But Cobo has rejected the pub- 
lic housing plan in preference to 
a scheme which would bypass use 
of the federal funds, use city 
monies to clear and prepare slum 
areas for development and theii 
sell the land at a loss to private 
interests for their exploitation. 



Detroit To Lose $100,000^000 
For Housing, Is Charge 


THE CIO NEWS, JANV^Y 9, 1900 


8 



As CWA Strike lx»oins 

AT&T To Pay Gifford 
$95,000 Yearly Pension 


By WILLIAM WEISS 

P ROOF THAT it pays to be 
chairman of the board of 
American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. came with the dis- 
closure that 65-year-old retir- 
ing head, Walter S. Gifford, 
will receive a $95,000-a-year 
pension in appreciation of his 
45 years’ service with Amer- 
ica’s largest business enter- 
prise. 

Gifford's retirement came at a 
time when 300,000 CIO Bell Tele- 
phone employes were asking that 
their average $75 monthly pension 
(including social security) be in- 
creased by the company to a 
figure more in line with living 
requirements. 

The Communications Workers 
of America has charged that the 
“pattern” of Bell comipanies’ nego- 
tiators is set by their parent com- 
pany,' AT&T. 

The Bell System may be faced 
with a nationwide strike of 250,000 
CWA members next month. 

“A strike of telephone workers 
may occur by the end of February 
or before unless satisfactory pay 
boosts and other contract im- 
provements are. negotiated,” CWA 
Vice Pres. A. T. Jones said. 

“Six CWA divisions with 100,0(X) 
members have already fulfilled the 
the requirements of the Taft-Hart- 
ley Act and are legally prepared 
to strike right away,” Jones 
stated. “Nineteen other divisions 
have taken steps to notify Bell 
companies of their desire to ne- 
gotiate new contracts or reopen 
old ones, and will take the legal 
steps necessary to permit them to 
strike at the end of February.” 


The story of Gifford’s career 
with AT&T reads, as one com- 
mentator said, “as though it had 
been jointly concocted by Horatio 
Alger and H. G. Wells.” 

He was born in 1885, the same 
year that AT&T was founded and 
only a few short years after the 
telephone itself was invented by 
Alexander Graham Bell. 

H e started to work for West- 
ern Electric in Chicago and 
first directed attention to himself 
by inventing a mathematical 
formula for figuring wages of 
piece-workers, which immediately 
classified him as an “efficiency ex- 
pert.” 

By the time the first transcon- 
tinental telephone call was made 
in 1915 the company considered 
Gifford ready for New York where, 
the New York Times says, “his 
efficiency began paying off on a 
larger scale.” 

Back in 1905 an incident which 
threatened to put an end to his 
promising career occurred. It 
seems he developed an aversion 
to punching timeclocks and was 
reprimanded. He immediately re- 
signed. According to the Times, 
the office manager called him 
back, studied his record — (Ed. 
Note: and possibly his connections 
with the front office) — ^and told 
him to forget about punching the 
timeclock. 

■^HE STORY lists as one of his 
■ proudest achievements his 
handling of the employment prob- 
lem when the telephone company 
switched to dial phones. 

Records of the company showed 


that an unusual number of women 
operators were insisting on leav- 
ing their jobs to marry and raise 
families. Gifford, according to the 
Times, immediately came up with 
a plan which “took this turnover 
into account and made the mech- 
anization process virtually pain- 
less.” (Whether it was “painless” 
to the company or the expectant 
brides goes unexplained.) 

The rules of AT&T require 
every employe to retire at the age 
of 65. “Gifford,” the article says, 
“is no exception. The company's 
pension plan pays a percentage of 
salary equal to the number of 
years- of service. Gifford has 
worked for the AT&T 45 years, so 
he gets 45% of his average an- 
nual salary of $209,750 in his best 
10 years or $95, (KK) a year.” 

(The same principle applies to any 
AT&T employe. For example, if a 
worker has averaged $35 a week for 
45 years, at the end of that time he 
or she is entitled to a yearly pension 
of $819, or $68.25 monthly.) 

During Gifford's 25 years as 
head of the telephone system, it 
underwent a tremendous growth. 
Its assets rose from $3 billion to 
more than $10 billion. Its yearly 
revenues total nearly $3 billion. 

There are now more than 33 
million telephones in the coun- 
try and more than 180 million 
calls a day are made. Gifford is 
one of the largest stockholders. 
He holds 1,513 AT&T shares at 
present. 

Home Construction 
Booms In Sweden 

In little Sweden, a big coopera- 
tive has built as much housing 
in the past eight years, propor- 
tionately, as all the public hous- 
ing authorities in the United 
States propose to build during 
the next six years. This is what 
Architect Ernest Grunsfeld of 
Chicago told the city's housing 
officials recently upon his return 
from Europe. 



Now They Know It, 
Thanks To AMA 


JANET RUSSELL 
* Adopted' Striker 

Guild Local 
^Adopts’ Little 
Rock Striker 

r [E CHICAGO Newspaper 
Guild has ^‘adopted” an 
Arkansas striker and is paying 
her living expenses for as long 
as the strike lasts. 

This technique of strike aid has 
been used often and successfully 
by the Guild. Lists of strikers and 
vital statistics about them — age, 
family obligations, etc. — 'are cir- 
culated to other locals, whose 
membership then “adopts” one or 
more strikers directly, in addition 
to supplying a steady stream of 
voluntary cash donations to the 
general strike fund. 

This time the struck paper is 
the Arkansas Gazette, oldest news- 
paper west of the Mississippi, 
whose Guild employes went QUt 
Dec. 17 after the Gazette manage- 
ment had refused to agree to the 
standard job security clause. 

The “adopted” striker is attrac- 
tive Janet Russell, secretary of the 
Arkansas Guild local. 


Start ’50 Right, 
Give Buck To PAC 


T he AMERICAN Medical 
Association has pulled a 
bad boner in its fight against 
national health insurance, ac- 
cording to the Committee for 
the Nation’s health. 

It has made one of those mis- 
takes so often committed by people 
opposed to progressive measures 
— and has given wide publicity to 
the very thing it is trying to kill. 
Nothing arouses more interest and 
curiosity than a violent attack. 

Today, thanks to AMA's expen- 
sive and sensational campaign 
against national health insurance 
legislation, millions of Americans 
who might not otherwise have 
given it a thought have learned 
about it, says the Committee. In 
its annual report for 1949, the 
Committee states: 

“Although 55 million pieces of 
literature have been circulated by 
the AMA’s $2 million lobby, at- 
tacking national health insurance 
violently, this stream of propa- 
ganda has also made millions of 
Americans learn that there is 
such a thing as health insurance, 
which many of them had never 
known before. 

“Once the plain people of this 
country understand that it is pos- 
sible to pre-pay sickness costs on 
the insurance principle and be 
able to call a doctor early in ill- 
ness without the fear of a fee or 
the stigma of charity, these peo- 
ple will demand insurance plans 
which offer them not the limited 
services which the AMA-sponsored 
plans provide, but the comprehen- 
sive services of physicians and 
hospitals which only the national 
health program favored by the 
Committee can furnish.” 

T he important accomplish- 
ment of 1949 in promoting na- 
tional health insurance, the com- 
mittee reports, “was to bring this 
issue into the foreground as one 
of the leading domestic issues in 
the 1950 political campaign.” 

The Committee predicted that 
while no comprehensive health 
legislation is likely to pass in the 






Organizationally Speaking 


By ALLAN S. HAYWOOD 

CIO Reg. Dir. Hugh Thompson reports that in 
a representation election held among the reporters, 
editors and other editorial department workers 
of the Buffalo (N. Y.) Evening 
News, the vote was as follows: 

Buffalo Local No. 26 ANG-CIO 
81; AFL 51; no union 0. 

Pres. Thomas E. Andert of the 
United Optical & Instrument 
Workers CIO, reports the follow- 
ing representation elections won 
in St. Paul and Minneapolis, 

Minn.: American Optical Co., St. 

Paul, Minn., CIO 6. AFL 1; 

American Optical Co., Minneapo- 
lis, CIO 8, AFL 0; Riggs Optical Co., Minneapolis, 
CIO 14, AFL 0; Riggs Optical Co., St. Paul, CIO 4, 
AFL 3; Walmon Optical Co., Minneapolis, CIO 8, 
AFL 4. In two state elections the results were as 
follows: Twin City Optical Co., Minneapolis, CIO 7, 
AFL 0; Johnson Optical Co., Minneapolis, CIO 7, 
AFL 0. Organizer Alberstein handled these elec- 
tions. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Ben Henry reports that in a rep- 
resentation election held at the Progressive Foun- 
dry, Perry, Iowa, the workers voted 48 to 38 in 
favor of the UAW-CIO. Inti Rep. Robert Johnston 
and William Short, president of Local 450, UAW- 
CIO, were in charge. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Ewald Sandner reports that in a 



representation election held at Robert Reiner, 
Inc. the vote was as follows: Eligible 260, lUE-CIO 
219, no union 13, void 4. CIO Rep. Bart Enright 
was in charge. 

The organized workers of Puerto Rico, recently 
affilia'ted with the CIO, are planning a big meeting 
Feb. 4, which the .writer will attend. In chartering 
the Puerto Rican workers, the CIO has undertaken 
to give every aid and assistance to build a strong 
trade union movement in Puerto Rico. 

Brother Ernesto Antonini, Secretary of Foreign 
Relations of the Puerto Rico General Confedera- 
tion of Labor, Inc., which represents some 150,()()0 
workers, has given the CIO splendid assistance 
and cooperation in developing a sound, progressive 
trade union movement that will serve as an ex- 
ample to other movements in the southern hemi- 
sphere. 

Brother Antonini represented the Puerto Ricans 
at the London conference which formed the new 
International Confederation of Free Trade Unions. 
He cooperated fully with the CIO on all matters. 
Similar cooperation has been extended by President 
Thomas Mendez and Secretary Armando Rivero 
of the Puerto Rico Confederation. 

Our unions everywhere are rallying to the sup- 
port of the lUE-CIO. Chairman Carey has been 
holding meetings to bring about maximum sup- 
port from all our affiliated organizations, on the 
local, regional, state, and national levels in this 
fight for free trade unionism. 


present session of the 81st Con- 
gress, passage of several impor- 
tant special bills included in the 
national health program may be 
expected. 

The Committee for the Nation’s 
health, a national group of doc- 
tors and laymen, was organized in 
1946 to promote comprehensive 
national health insurance legisla- 
tion. CIO Pres. Philip Murray is 
a member of the board of direc- 
tors. 

Treedom’ 
Course Probe 
Is Planned 

D oes a boss have a right to 
make employes listen to a 
talk by an outside speaker dur- 
ing working hours? 

This odd kind, of “work assign- 
ment” has cropped up in Milwau- 
kee and CIO delegates to the 
Milwaukee County CIO Council 
are up in arms about it. 

The Council is planning an in- 
vestigation of a series of “Free- 
dom Forum” lectures given to 
Allis-Chalmers workers — attend- 
ance compulsory. 

The Council charges that New 
Deal and progressive measures 
were attacked in the lectures as 
socialism and communism. “This 
stuff they force us to listen to,” 
one delegate said, “sounds like 
the same propaganda the fascists 
try to peddle.” 

CIO Auto Workers Local 248, 
whose members work at Allis- 
Chalmers, also has registered 
heated protests. Charles Schulz, 
the local's president, termed the 
lectures “Republican propaganda,” 
and denounced the practice of 
compelling the workers to listen 
as a “work assignment.” 

Glen Clarke, the CIO Council's 
secretary-treasurer, has been in- 
structed to look into the matter. 

Israeli Workers 
To Study Abroad 

A GROUP OF 50 to 55 workers 
in Israel will be sent abroad 
to study production methods in 
various industrial countries under 
a plan announced by Histadrut, 
the General Federation of Jewish 
Labor in Israel. 

A 10-day seminar attended by 
nearly 100 skilled factory workers 
from 75 shops and factories in 
the metal, textile, leather, print- 
ing, glass and food industries was 
held in December at the Histadrut 
Workers’ College. The seminar 
was part of a program of setting 
up joint production committees in 
factories and of sending workers’ 
delegations abroad for first-hand 
study of productivity methods. 

Workers at the seminar were 
chosen by local labor councils and 
national trade unions in consulta- 
tion with Histadrut’s Trade Union 
Dept. At the close of the seminar, 
the workers returned to their jobs 
where they will take an active 
part in the planned formation of 
joint production committees. 

Later some 50 to 55 of the par- 
ticipants will be selected to go 
with workers’ delegations to vari- 
ous countries for several months’ 
training and observation. Arrange- 
ments will be made for them in 
each country to spend some time 
in actual work in factories similar 
in size and type to those in which 
they are employed in Israel 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 9, 1950 




Still Serious Obstacles To Negro Suffrage 


Dixie’s Racial, Religious 
Progress Is Cited 

These random milestones of Southern progress in 1949 are noted 
in the Christian Science Monitor: 

The citizens of Little Rock, Ark., voted a $359,000 bond issue 
for a Negro park and recreational facilities. 

By awarding an honorary degree to Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, 
prominent Negro educator, Rollins College, at Winter Park, Fla., 
became, it is believed, the first Southern white college to so honor a 
Negro for achievement. 

The Florida Legislature passed an enabling act to permit Miami 
Beach to prohibit discriminatory signs or advertisements of either a 
religious or racial nature. 

The Georgia Leglislature passed a law requiring the counties of the 
state to use a “secret ballot” in all elections. 

The Georgia Supreme Court ruled that counties with substantial 
Negro populations must put Negro citizens on the grand and traverse 
jury lists — and now Negroes are being called for jury service in many 
counties for the first time since Reconstruction days. 


IIVHE LON<J struggle for 
I Negro enfrachisement in 
the South apparently went 
over the ‘hump’ in 1949,” 
states an article in a recent 
issue of the Christian Science 
Monitor.- 

The fight for Negro suffrage in 
the South, however, will un- 
doubtedly have to continue for 
years to come, it adds, for arbi- 
trary local practices and inter- 
pretations of registration laws are 
still serious obstacles. Here are 
some significant excerpts from the 
article: 

“Broadly, it can be said that 
the few states which have very 
heavy Negro populations, and 
which have so strenuously op- 
posed Negro suffrage in the last 
five years, have apparently, at 
long last, become reconciled to 
the fact that there is no effective 
legal substitute for the ‘white 
primary’ declared unconstitutional 
by the federal courts. 

“The various ‘plans’ to get 
around the Supreme Court de- 
cision opening the South’s Demo- 
cratic primaries to Negroes have 
either been knocked down by the 


courts or expediently abandoned. 
The last major fight seems to 
have come in Georgia, where the 
original enthusiasm over a Tal- 
madge - sponsored re - registration 
law has appreciably waned. 

“The Georgia law, enacted 


last January, called for a new 
registration of voters to be 
completed in time for the 1950 
elections. It was admittedly aimed 
at what its sponsors called Negro 
‘bloc voting.’ The effect was to 
wipe out the state’s existing re- 
gistration of ' 1,200,000 votes 


among whom are 120,000 Negroes. 
Negroes have voted in Georgia in 
larger numbers than in any other 
Southern state. 

“The new law put up to the 159 
counties — most of them not only 
small, but distinctly rural — the 
difficult and costly task of re- 
registering the voters according 
to the newly devised qualifica- 
tions. 

“These qualifications include a 
‘literacy’ test, and, for illiterates 
-a requirement that 10 out of 30 
specified questions about govern- 
ment be answered correctly.” 

The article points out that once 
the law is in operation it will 
have to stand the test of consti- 
tutionality in the federal courts, 
and these in recent years have 
invariably considered the intent 
as well as the letter of the South’s 
voting laws. 

Since the counties were slow in 
appointing registrars, the work of 
re - registration has scarcely 
started and if the law remains in 
effect, it is estimated that it will 
cut the number of qualified voters 
in 1950 down to about half the 
number previously registered. But 
it is quite probable that the 1950 
state legislature, convening this 


month, will postpone use of the 
new voters’ list until after the 
1950 elections. 

I N ALABAMA, the article states, 
an attempt to get the legisla- 
ture to pass a similar re-registra- 
tion law, failed. The Federal' 
courts previously had declared un- 
constitutional this state’s require- 
ment that «a prospective voter be 
required to “interpret” the Con- 
stitution to the satisfaction of the 
registrars. 

In South Carolina, the legisla- 
ture meeting in January will be 
faced with the task of restoring 
some sort of election laws to the 
statute books to replace previous 
restrictions interfering with the 
right of Negroes which were ruled 
unconstitutional. 

“As the Negro gains political 
rights in the South,” the article, 
concludes, “there is some indica- 
tion that some parts of the region 
are taking a more democratic 
attitude in regard to the Negro 
race. 

“Here and there, Negroes are 
beginning to win elective office, 
and in some instances, they are 
beginning to be appointed to im- 
portant governmental boards.” 




Did ^Life’ Accidentally Hit Old Guard GOP? 


“10 A. M., the Mayor; 10:30 A. M., the Civic Planners; 11 A. M., 
your board meeting; 12 o’clock, you take your acidosis milk.” 


N. J. CIO Asks Rutgers Reform 


The New Jersey State CIO on 
January 6 called for major 
changes in the state’s contract 
with Rutgers University, designed 
“to create a genuine State Uni- 
versity under effective public con- 
trol and furnishing tuition-free 
education to New Jersey’s stu- 
dents.” 

Harry Kranz, State CIO legis- 
lative director, said the CIO’s 
legislative committee had decided 
to support Rutgers’ request for 
about $4,000,000 additional state 
aid to wipe out tuition fees for 
New Jersey students, “only if 
Rutgers permits a majority of 
public members on its board of 
trustees.” 

If Rutgers does not agree to 
this condition, Kranz said, “then 
the state should contract other 
colleges and universities in the 


state to furnish education to ca- 
pable youngsters, without sinking 
further state funds into buildings 
on the campus of a single essen- 
tially-private institution.” 

Mrs. Roosevelt Stays 
On NAACP Board 

Reversing an earlier decision to 
resign from the board of directors 
of the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored Peo- 
ple because of the pressure of her 
duties at the United Nations, Mrs. 
Eleanor Roosevelt has consented 
to complete her present term as a 
board member, Roy Wilkins, act- 
ing NAACP secretary announced. 

In a letter to Arthur B. Spin- 
garn, NAACP president, Mrs. 
Roosevelt wrote, under date of 
Dec. 26: “I am very glad to stay 
on for a year,” 


vania. New Jersey, California and 
Montana. Nevins even quotes one 
of the class of privileged wealth 
as saying that the rich own Amer- 
ica and intend to keep it, admit- 
ting also that the rich bought 
legislators. 

Nevjns also pointed out that 
“for capital to combine was sane 
business practice ; for labor to 
. combine was to challenge the 
tradition of individual initiative. 
Business in politics promised re- 
spectability; labor in politics 
could only mean subversive forces 
at work.” 

Does the line of the Old Guard 
Republicans, and the National As- 
sociation of Manufacturers, and 
the Committee for Constitutional 
Government, sound any different 
today? Even today, in the mid- 
west, union members are being 
forced to listen, on company time, 
to “Freedom Forums,” which turn 
out to be attacks on the Truman 
policies, as previous “patriotic” 
enterprises to “save America” 
turned out to be attacks on the 
Roosevelt program. 

W ELL, BILL MAUDLIN, 28, 
the famous cartoonist of 
World War II, speaks up for 
what Life calls the “scared rab- 
bit” generation, and he sums it 
up neatly. “Better the risk of 
a ^ittle inflation than a hole in 
the head,” says . he. 

And he' advises his scared elders 
to take it easy, not to get into 
such a tizzy over the urge for 
security, and he explains why 
his generation looks for security 
in the kind of world we live in, 
with a third World War by no 
means uncertain. 

And he explains why the vet- 
erans, by and large, are for the 
Democrats, and not the Republi- 
cans. Maudlin says the veterans 
are not leaning towards “social- 
ism” but that “the Democrats, 
in their own special, bumbling, 
often expensive and sometimes 
bureaucratic way, take more in- 
terest in the things that make 
us more apprehensive than the 
Republicans do.” 

Perhaps if the Republicans lis- 
tened more to the Bill Mauldins 
and less to the Tafts and the 
Wherrys, they might regain the 
people’s confidence, and win an 
election sometime. 


Photo by Austin, Tex., American-Statesman 

THREE LITTLE POLIO PATIENTS, (1. to r.), Dickie William- 
son, 4, Richard Hunt, 3, and Bill Robertson, Jr., 4, all of Austin, 
Tex., enjoy a workout in a hydrotherapy tank designed to help 
.restore mobility to their youthful bodies. The progress of 
thousands of infantile paralysis patients stricken last year in 
the worst epidemic ever reeprded in this country depends for 
help on contributions to the March of Dimes campaign (January 
16-31). 


By Bindford V. Carter 

For Labor Press Association 

^HIS IS A story about Life — 
the magazine, that is. Its 
mid-century issue, whether the 
editors meant it or not (and it’s 
a good bet that they did not), is 
an excellent argument against the 
Old Guard Republicans, and all 
the other forces that fought the 
Roosevelt regime and now battle 
the Truman program — all in the 
name of preserving free enter- 
prise. 

Life’s “average man” of 1900 to 
1950 turns out to be one who was 
making $10,000 a year in 1932 and 
is now so well fixed that he is 
thinking of retiring. (Life seems 
to have overlooked the fact that 
in this prosperous country, today, 
10,000,000 families have incomes of 
$2000 or under a year.) 

There is only one strike picture 
— a striker felling a policeman. 
(There are no pictures of police 
killing strikers.) There is a pic- 


ture of an apple seller during the 
Hoover depression, and a picture 
of a child in a cotton mill, and 
the caption says “Humanity was 
exploited as American industry 
grew to gaint’s size.” (But there 
is no mention of the exploitation 
that still exists in the south to- 
day, or of exploitation of the mi- 
grant farm workers in California’s 
rich valleys.) 

yHE ANSWER to the cry of a 
■ return “to the good days” is 
the article by Allan Nevins, 
the historian, who says that the 
America of 1900 “was not in fact 
a just or good society.” He quotes 
the record — the army of young- 
sters under 16 at work; the fact 
that the meat packers “not only 
sweated their labor and robbed 
the public but also were not 
above grinding up dead rats into 
their sausage”; the fact that great 
wealth “seemed bent on making 
government itself captive,” and 
did just about that in Pennsyl- 


10 


THE CIO NEWS, JANtJARY 9, 1950 


N 



Movie 


Shows 


i 4- T 

Voters Need Constant Vigilance To Halt Corruption 


^ The movie, “All the King’s Men,” from which the photos on this 
page were taken, is the story of Willie Stark, rural American. But 
it is more than that — it shows what happens when the voters are not 
constantly alert and should be a lesson for trade unionists. 


2 In the preceding scene and this one Stark (who is wearing the white 
suit and the panama) is at the beginning of his first campaign for 
governor, running on an “honesty” program in which he sincerely 
believes. Here he .is talking to the voters. 


2 Stark gets the political low-down from Sadie Burke, who was sent 
by big-city politicians to watch him. She tells him he is being used 
to split the rural vote so the machine can win. Reporter Jack Burden 
listens as Sadie wises up the candidate. 




Stark goes on a terrific binge. Instead of making a “safe” speech, 
he uncovers the scheme of the politicians. Stark causes a terrific 
sensation, but loses the election. (Had Stark made the speech earlier, 
he may have won.) 


J With help from Jack Burden and Sadie Burke, Stark is elected when 
he again runs for governor. He not only attracts the votes but 
Jack’s girl, aristocratic Anne Stanton. Here he looks over his victory 
statement, at campaign headquarters. 


From the balcony of his campaign headquarters Stark addresses the 
crowd, pledging an honest administration. A change is gradually 
coming over Stark — a lust for power. (In the background is a giant 
poster of the candidate.) 


2 Coupled with Stark’s lust for power — symbolized by this scene in 
which he reviews the state troopers — is corruption. He justifies 
himself by reasoning he is doing more good than evil. (Along about 
this time, an informed and determined electorate would have become 
wise and would have acted.) 


O Stark dedicates a new hospital — built less out of concern about 
health than out of desire to glorify Stark and his regime. Dr. Adam 
Stanton (on Stark’s right) hates Stark’s corruption; but he takes 
direction of the hospital to save his father’s name from Stark’s 
blackmail. Events begin to move swiftly. 


^ Stark’s corruption finally leads to an impeachment move — which 
fails when he cajls out the rural voters to impress the legislators. 
But Dr. Stanton — infuriated by Stark’s corruption of his sister and 
threats to his father — shoots the dictatorial governor. Union spectators 
reported the, movie showed need of PAG. 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 9, 1950 


Bill Would Show Congressmen’s ‘Other’ Ineomes 


By NATHAN ROBERTSON 

For Labor Press Association 

S EN. WAYNE MORSE (R., 
Ore.) is proposing the most 
important Congressional re- 
form in many years — one 
which is far more fundamental 
than all the changes in the 
Congressional Reorganization 
Act of 1946. It would require 
members of Congress to dis- 
close any incomes outside of 
their Congressional salaries. 

Unfortunately, the Morse pro- 
posal has no chance of approval 
at this session of Congress be- 
cause it is one of the most ’un- 
popular bills now pending. But 
if organized labor and liberals 
get behind it, it will pass within 
the next few years. 

The Morse proposal would un- 
mask the most dangerous lobby 
in Washington— the Tobby which 
operates from within the cham- 
bers of Congress through the 
members who are connected, di- 
'rectly or indirectly, wilh special 
interests. 

The reason it is so unpopular 
and has so little chance even to 
be considered by a committee is 
because Congress is loaded down 
with such inside lobbyists. Some 
of them are consciously repre- 


senting special interests. Others 
are doing so unconsciously, ra- 
tionalizing the fact that they are 
voting and working on the side 
of their own pocketbooks. 

I^ORSE’S proposal would force 
such inside lobbyists to un- 
mask, and let the public judge 
whether they were voting their 
convictions or only their pocket- 
books. It would no longer permit 
this decision to be made by the 
Congressmen themselves, as is 
now done. 

Furthermore, Morse’s proposal 
would make it doubly difficult 
for members of Congress to get 
involved in such scandals as have 
recently sent a series of Con- 
gressmen to jail. If Congressmen 
were required to let their con- 
stituents know their outside in- 
come, they would not be so likely 
to ask their employes to “kick 
back” part of their salary, or to 
sell their services to special in- 
terests, or to play the market 
on the basis of their inside in- 
formation. All of these things 
have been happening in Congress, 
and perhaps on a much wider 
scale than anyone knows about. 

But the most important func- 
tion the legislation would serve 
would be to uncover not illegal 
operations, but legal bribery of 
members of Congress by special 
interests through fees to their 


law firms, or other such indirect 
payments. It might also be ex- 
panded to cover payments in the 
form of donations to campaign 
funds. 

F ew people outside of Con- 
gress have any idea how 
serious this problem is. Some 
liberal members of Congress 
know, well, because they have 
seen their pet legislative pro- 
posals wrecked by men secretly 
working for special interests 
either because they were paid 
directly for their services, or 
because they held stock in the 
companies involved. 

But even those Congressmen 
who know how bad the situation 
is hesitate to do anything about 
it because of the hatred they 
would incur and the resentment 
they would stir up. One promi- 
nent member of Congress told 
me last week he could not afford 
to push for such legislation be- 
cause it would make him useless 
in all other legislative fights — 
his colleagues would shun him 
and everything he said or did. 

This fear has prevented action 
on this problem for many 'years. 
I have been interested in such 
legislation for several years, and 
have talked to many Congress- 
men about it. 

My interest began back about 
1944 when I found that most of 
the members of Congress who 


were pushing for legislation ex- 
empting the insurance "companies 
from the anti-trust laws were 
either lawyers for insurance com- 
panies or had other connections 
with them. The public, of course, 
never knew this — or the efforts 
of these Congressmen would have 
been discredited. 

It is difficult even to gather 
evidence on the seriousness of 
the inside lobby for the purposes 
' of demanding legislation. Mem- 
bers of Congress who have such 
connections do not, of course, 
like to talk about them. Efforts 
to question th’em draw resent- 
ment and much evasion. But it 
is known, for instance", that there 
are many members of Congress 
who belong to law firms repre- 
senting special interests. Most 
Congressmen are lawyers and 
many continue to draw fees from 
their firms. 

Other members of Congress get 
pay directly or indirectly from 
such interests as air transport 
companies, railroads, steel com- 
panies, and some of the biggest 
monopolies in the country. When 
they attack the anti-trust laws, 
or defend the special interests 
of these companies they are not 
talking as statesmen, as they 
seem to the public to be doing, 
but as stockholders^ o/ paid lob- 
byists. These facts should, of 
course, be known to the public. 

One of the most- vicious attacks 


ever made on the anti-trust divi- 
sion was made a few years ago by 
a Republican Senator who was 
connected with a big company 
which dominates its industry and 
was under attack by the anti- 
trust division. The public, of 
course, did not realize this. 

The 'viciousness of pocketbook 
influence on a Senator was rec-- 
ognized years ago by the man 
who once occupied the office now 
used by Morse — Sen. James Cou- 
zens of Michigan. Couzens was 
one of the richest men ever to 
sit in the Senate. But before he 
took his seat he put all of his 
money — about $30,000,000 — into 
government bonds so that he 
would be above suspicion. 

Instead of voting always with 
the special interests — as most 
wealthy Senators do — Couzens 
usually voted against them. He 
was one of the best public serv- 
ants who ever sat in the Senate. 

Morse’s legislation would force 
more members of Congress fo do 
what dozens did — or suffer the 
consequences. If they wanted to 
keep their money in private cor- 
porations they could, but the 
voters would have a chance to 
judge their actions in the light 
of that knowledge. No Senator 
or Congressman who is operat- 
ing honestly should object to 
that. But they do — and so do the 
many who, consciously or uncon- 
sciously, are operating dishonestly. 


Fraud In Michigan Election Charged 




C HARGES OF ‘^grave irreg- 
ularities” that ‘'amount 
to fraud under the law” were 
detailed to a House committee 
in Washington last week by 
spokesmen for George D. Ste- 
vens, labor^backed Democratic 
candidate for Congress from 
Flint, Mich. 

Stevens is demanding a recount 
of the ballots in the 1948 election, 
when he apparently lost by 784 
votes out of 146,000 cast. 

Pro-union members of Congress 
point to the signficance of the 
contest in the light of the voting 
record of the Republican who was 
seated in the close election, Wil- 
liam R. Blackney. Blackney since 
he was seated has voted “wrong” 
on all except one of the key votes 
recorded by CIO-PAC and Labor’s 
League for Political Education. 

Committee Chairman Burr Har- 
rison (D, Va.) has been charged 
with obstructing Stevens’ efforts to 
obtain a recount because of a 
letter he sent to the city clerk of 
Flint, advising him to ignore a 
subpoena to produce ballots for a 
recount. 


New Use For Phone 
Book Found By CWA 


“Memo from Pac” reports that 
the Iowa CIO has worked out a 
scheme for licking “that always 
pesky job of making up a mailing 
list of unionists in the state.” 

In each city, a telephone book 
is passed around each local, and 
a check mark is placed beside the 
names of its members. The book 
is then sent to the state office, 
which copies the names onto a 
master mailing list. 

The book then can be sent back 
to the local, taken apart, and 
passed on to a registration com- 
mittee or any other union group 
desiring to phone the members. 

- Members without telephones, or 
those who live outside the area 
covered by the city directory, are 
listed separately. 

The idea originated with CWA, 
natch. 


S tevens, a youthful attorney 
who is secretary of Flint’s 
school board, said that if he loses 
out in a vote promised him Jan. 
10 in the House Administration 
Committee, or on the floor of the 
House when it reaches that body, 
he’ll keep right on fighting and 


"IHmm dU-liarik are trying the last 
mopt to hoop one ahead of 
the Mknt movement r 


will run against Blackney again 
next November. 

Stevens’ supporters told the 
committee that, even though they 
hadn’t been able to get a recount, 
they had instance after instance 
of errors such as tally clerks 
falling asleep, and “corrections” 
amounting to as many as 433 votes 
made by the Gennessee County 
board of canvassers’ clerk. 


The issue, Stanley R. Beattie, 
who spoke for Stevens, told the 
Congressmen, “is the disenfran- 
chisement of 72,000 voters. Re- 
counts make for the purity of 
elections. We are asking that the 
wrong done by the state court be 
removed and that the original 
evidence, the best evidence, be 
looked into to see whether Stev- 
ens lost by 724 votes.” (LPA) 


ITU Hit Again By T-H 

■pHE NLRB jumped on the Inti. 

■ Typographical Union-AFL 


again in a decision involving the 
international and seven locals in 
six cities. For the fourth time, 
the board found the ITU had 
violated the Taft-Hartley act by 
insisting on closed shop condi- 
tions. Complaints were filed by 
commercial printing plants in Chi- 
cago, Detroit (two locals), Pitts- 
burgh, Newark, $t. Louis and 
Philadelphia. — 

Both the international and the 
locals were held guilty of causing 
or attempting to cause employers 
to discriminate against employes 


on a basis of union membership. 
In addition, the locals were found 
guilty of not bargaining in good 
faith within the meaning of; the 
Taft-Hartley act. 

This and previous cases 
stemmed from the bargaining 
policy adopted by the ITU after 
the Taft-Hartley act was passed 
in 1947. Earlier decisions involved 
the union and the Chicago News- 
paper Publishers A'ss’n, the Amer- 
ican Newspaper Publishers Assn’ 
and Baltimore job printers. 

In the present case, the seven 
locals and the international were 
ordered to cease the forbidden 
practices. (LPA) 


Prospects Good for Bill Expanding Social Security 


T here is strong possibility 
that this session of Con- 
gress will pass a law expand- 
ing the Social Security system. 

The House at the previous ses- 
sion passed a bill to expand the 
system, and Sen. George (D., Ga.) 
has announced that the Fin^ce 
Committee, which he heads, will 
open hearings on the bill soon, 
perhaps by Jan. 16. He predicted 
completed action at this session. 

The House bill would give 11 
million persons old age and sur- 
vivors’ insurance for the first 
time and increase benefits gen- 
erally an average of 80%. 

What kind of a bill will be 
satisfactory to Republican leader- 
ship is a question, in view of 


the statement by Sen. Taft (R., 
Ohio). He said that Congress 
should act at this session but 
added that it would be %“unwise” 
to link pensions paid by industry 
with social security. 

|%UT THE Economic Outlook of 
the CIO Dept, of Education 
and Research foresaw the likeli- 
hood that industrial interests 
would want to link pensions — 
such as have been won by the 
CIO Steelworkers and the CIO 
Auto Workers — with social se- 
curity. 

Commented the Outlook: 

“O n e development stemming 
from the recent CIO collective 
bargaining agreements for pen- 
sions and social security may 


well be the stimulation of Con- 
gress to take long delayed steps 
to improve social security legis- 
lation. 

“One of the features of the 
auto and the steel contracts, and 
many other collective bargaining 
contracts now being entered into, 
is that the pension paid is inclu- 
sive of the social security bene- 
fits; that is, the higher the gov- 
ernment’s contribution, as a re- 
sult of the old age and survivors’ 
insurance program, the less will 
be the contribution of the em- 
ployer to the workers’ pension. 

“For example, if an individual 
worker is entitled to $100 and the 
government’s contribution is $25, 
the employer will have to pay $75. 
However, if the federal govern- 


ment’s pension were increased, 
the company would have to pay 
only a $50 contribution in order 
to arrive at the $100 pension. 

■ WORKER could be entitled 
to a $150 pension. The gov- 
ernment no-w contributes only $25 
so the company is obligated to 
pay $125. If, however, the fed- 
eral government’s payment was 
increased to $50, the company 
would contribute only $100, thus 
saving $25 a month on that 
pension. 

“These two examples clearly- 
show that it will be to the advan- 
tage of employes for reasons all 
their own to bring pressure upon 
the federal government to in- 
crease the Old Age and Survivors’ 
Insurance program. 


“In other words, the employers 
now have an incentive to work 
for increased social security pay- 
ments by the federal government. 
One of the basic contributions, 
therefore, which the trade union 
movement has made in the whole 
social security field may well be 
the stimulation of employer 
groups to fight for improved fed- 
eral old age pension programs. 

“Employers may well begin 
pressuring for improved federal 
benefits, not because they believe 
in them, as such, but because 
they are interested in reducing 
their own costs. But, for what- 
ever reason they engage in lobby- 
ing, the majority of the American 
workers stand to benefit.” 


12 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 9, 1950 


N 



WHEN RENT CONTROLS were lifted in the town of Shamokin, 
Pa., on Jan. 1, members of the CIO Amalgamated Clothing 
Workers found themselves faced with increases averaging 40%. 
They took their story straight to Tighe Woods, federal housing 
expediter, who had issued the decontrol order. Here the delega- 
tion is with Woods. L. to r., Harold Sneltz, president of ACW 
Local 129 and secretary of the Northumberland County CIO 


HST Budget Assures 
‘Growth of Country’ 

President Truman has challenged the economy bloc in 
Congress. He submitted another unbalanced budget in order 
to carry out his Fair peal program for making America 
Stronger. He said that the budget provides for steps “which 
support rather than impair , the continued growth of our 
country.” (See stories on Pages 3 and 6.) 


Council; J. R. Petroski, member of ACW Local 129; John Edel- 
man, TWUA Washington representative; Woods; William B. 
McCaig, International representative of TWUA Local 173; 
Richard Sharp, secretary-treasurer of TWUA Local 173; Helen 
Blanchard, ACW Washington representative; and William Ma- 
her, president of TWUA Local 173. (See Page 9 for details and 
for story on New York State’s action on decontrols.) 


Co-Op Housing Issue 
‘Summons’ Lobbyists 

The “middle-income” housing bill, including provision 
for long-term, low-interest loans to cooperatives, is due for 
early Senate consideration. A -swarm of real estate lobbyists 
has hit town to turn on the pressure against this bill and to try 
to kill rent control. The bill is favored by CIO and AFL; it 
offers a 2S% reduction in housing costs. (See story page 9.) 


Public Workers Heard on ^Red^ Charges 

j Page 2) 




No. 3 


Vol. XIII 


WASHINGTON. D. C.. JANUARY 16. 1950 


8 ? 



Public Workers Heard On Red Charges 



THE HEARING WAS RECESSED for five minutes so that 
Pres. Abram Flaxer (left, wearing bow tie) could tell his 
members from New York City and Washington that his request 
that they be allowed to attend the hearing had been denied* 


HE UNITED Public Work- 
ers'^ of America, charged 
with following Communist 
Party rather than CIO policies, 
was given a three-day closed- 
door hearing at CIO headquar- 
ters in Washington last week. 

Some 48 hours before the hear- 
ing started, the Public Workers 
released to newspapers (not in- 
cluding The CIO News) a long 
statement denying the charges 
and using a wide variety of adjec- 
tives to attempt a smear of the 
CIO, Pres. Philip Murray and 
other CIO officials. 

^ Throughout the period of the 
closed hearings, the Public Work- 
ers used daily press conferences 
to continue the propaganda cam- 
paign against CIO. It followed a 
now-familiar theme of damning 
CIO policies and motives, while 
at the same time insisting that 
the union leadership wishes to 
continue its affiliation with the 
organization it attacks so vigor- 
ously. 

But while Pres. Abram Flaxer 
of the United Public Workers con- 
tinued his denial that the union 
leadership had either followed 
Communist policies or flouted CIO 
policies, witnesses before the CIO 
hearing appeared to be offering 
quite another story. 

The witnesses against the Pub- 
lic Workers — two of whom re- 
leased -sections of their testimony 
to the press — were backed up by 
a mass of photostatic copies of 
the union's paper and other pub- 
lications. 

P RES. WIEULAM Steinberg of 
the American Radio Associa- 
tion — who filed the original 
charges against the Public Work- 
ers at the Cleveland meeting of 
the CIQ Board last November — 
was one of the principal witnesses 
against the Public Workers. 

He charged that the union had 
''diligently followed every twist 
and turn of the Communist Party 
line from its inception to the pres- 
ent date.” 

Steinberg charged that the 
State County & Municipal Work- 
ers — ^which in 1946 joined with the 
United Federal Workers -to form 
the present UPWA — had per- 
formed a variety of somersaults 


MMSW Hearing 
Set For Jan. 18 

The Inti. Union of Mine Mill ■ 
& Smelter Workers is scheduled' 
for a hearing Jan. 18 before a 
CIO hearing committee in Wash- 
ington. Like nine other affiliates, 
the union has been charged with 
Communist domination. The CIO 
constitution bars affiliation of 
unions which follow Communist 
rather than CIO policies. 

Hearings have already been 
V held on similar charges lodged 
against three other unions: the 
United Office & Professional 
Workers; the Food Tobacco 85 
Agricultural Workers; the United 
Public Workers. 

Both UOPWA ai>d FTA have 
gone into court, in New York 
and Washington, to seek injunc- 
tions against further ‘ action 
against them by CIO. Hearings 
have been held on two of the in- 
junction proceedings, but the 
courts have not yet announced 
their decisions. 


on war policy that coincided with 
changes in the Communist line. 

He recalled that in 1940 — before 
Hitler's invasion of Russia — the 
union had "lavish praise, for the 
isolationist activities of Senator 
Burton K. Wheeler." In 1946 the 
union hailed government reports 
which accused Wheeler of having 
"gotten his isolationist propa- 
ganda from Nazi Germany," Stein- 
berg added. 

"They didn't go o-n to explain 
that at the same time in 1940, 
Wheeler was their darling and 
that they, the union, had attacked 
Roosevelt for not agreeing with 
Wheeler . . . This stand concern- 
ing Wheeler shows up the mock- 
ery, fraud and hypocrisy of the 
union's pretense at patriotism.” 

Reviewing other actions of the 
UPWA and Pres. Abram Flaxer, 
Steinberg concluded: "We find, as 
I have already shown, that they 
operated on behalf of the Com- 
munist Party, and that their judg- 
ments were not dictated by any 
concern for the interest of the 
labor movement of this country or 
for the CIO." 


A NOTHER KEY witness against 
the UPWA leadership was 
Charles Rindone, a special patrol- 
man of the New York City Dept, 
of Welfare, and formerly a mem- 
ber of UPWA Local 1, and of the 
Communist Party. Rindone is now 
a member of the American Civic 
Employes Association, affiliated 
with the CIO Utility Workers. 

Rindone testified that several 
months after joining the Public 
Workers in 1935, he became a 
member of the Communist Party. 
He said he had "personal knowl- 
edge" that UPWA Pres. Flaxer 
and many other of the union's 
officials were "associated with the 
Communist Party.” 

He said he could remember at 
least two Co<mmunist party "frac- 
tion" meetings at which Flaxer 
and other union officials had been 
present to discuss union policies. 

"The Communist Party appara- 
tus in the Dept, of Welfare was 
regularly used to control the ac- 
tions and policies of the local 
union and to channel Communist 
Party policy into the union," 
Rindone said. 

"Fraction meetings were held in 
advance of the union membership 
meetings. At those meetings the 
Communist Party position was 
always agreed upon. Then the 
agreed-upon policy would be pre- 
sented to the union meeting and 
be adopted by the union.” 

He also charged that well-adver- 
tised dances, raffles and other 
fund-raising projects were often 
conducted by the local, ^ith "the 
proceeds diverted to some Com- 
munist party projects.” 

■VHE PUBLIC Workers hearings 
■ opened Jan. 9 and ended on 
the evening of Jan. 11. Hearing 
the testimony was a three-man 
CIO committee consisting of Pres. 
Emil Rieve of the Textile Work- 
ers, Pres. Joseph Beirne of Com- 
munications Workers, and Pres. 
Harry Sayre of the United Paper- 
workers. Lawyers and spectators 
were barred from the hearings. 

Although some radio commenta- 
tors had predicted that a crowd 
of 300 would come from New York 
and other eastern cities to create 
a riot outside CIO headquarters 
when the hearings began, the 
Monday morning scene on Wash- 


ington’s Jackson Place was serene 
and peaceful. 

About 50 persons who identified 
themselves as UPWA members 
souglTt to enter CIO headquarters 
in order to appear at the hearing 
as witnesses. 

In the group were five children, 
under five years of age, and 
dressed in attractive snow suits. 
Neither they nor the rest of the 
group were permitted to enter 
the hearing. In attendance at the 
hearings were Pres. Flaxer, Secy,- 
Treas. Ewart Guinier, and other 
national figures in the union. 

I N TWO REPORTS made avail- 
able to the press, and in three 
press conferences, Flaxer used 
sharp words against the CIO. 

The union’s preliminary state- 
ment said the charge — of Commu- 
nist domination of UPWA — "is a 
lie, the 'trial' is a fake, its meth- 
ods, the methods of dictators, and 
its sole weapon, the ancient red 
herring . . ." 

The statement asserted that 
CTO leaders, not the Public Work- 
ers, were violating '‘basic CIO 


policy in almost every major par- 
ticular.” In an obvious attack on 
CIO's foreign policy, it charged 
that CIO leaders are "sacrificing 
labor’s independent role ... by 
surrender to a foreign policy that 
is the product of labor’s enemies.'* 
Later, Flaxer charged that the 
Dept, of Labor had paid for photo- 
stats ,of "179" documents used by 
witnesses in making their case 
against the union. Labor Dept, 
officials pointed out that the same 
service is available to "every re- 
search organization, public or pri^ 
vate, including the Public Work- 
ers.” 

At his press conferences, Flaxer 
denied that he is a Communist, 
and claimed that one purpose of 
the hearings against his union 
was to "cover up” the CIO's "ina- 
bility to lead the rank and file 
and obtain better wages and 
hours." 

T hat claim— with little basis 
of fact to shore it up — ^was 
quickly countered by a statement 
issued by CIO Pres. Murray. (See 
other story this page). 



Murray Says ‘No Need For Confusion About Issues' 


CIO Pres. Philip Murray, who 
has been the subject of an almost 
continuous sniping attack in the 
Daily Worker and in the columns 
of many left-wing union publica- 
tions, last week issued a statement 
For a public perhaps confused by 
the left-wing attacks, Murray ex- 
plained CIO’s motives, procedures 
and actions in dealing with charges 
of Communist domination against 
certain unions. 

Pres. Murray’s statement: 

IIVHE CIO, at its last conven- 
■ tion, adopted constitutional 
amendments barring continued 
affiliation to any Communist- 
dominated national union. 

"Ten affiliates of the CIO have 
been formally accused of Commu- 
nist domination. 

"Fact-finding hearings have al- 
ready been held in the case of 
three of these accused organiza- 
tions. Other hearings will be 
held in coming months. 

"These hearings have been con- 
ducted in. accordance with tradi- 
tional CIO democratic procedures. 
The accused unions and their 
leaderships have been offered 
complete due process; they have 
been given adequate opportunity 
to defend themselves against the 
charges. 


"It cannot be said that any of 
the unions which have been 
brought before the CIO hearing 
boards represent any substantial 
proportion of American workers. 
The Communist carbon-copy pol- 
icies which they have followed 
through the years have pre- 
vented them from following the 
basic CIO policy of organizing 
the unorganized; and many of 
the members who joined those 
unions in good faith have left 
those orgstnizations in disgust. 

• "The United Public Workers, 


which yesterday issued a libelous 
attack upon the CIO, is an or- 
ganization of some 30,000 mem- 
bers, It has signally failed to 
organize the millions of federal, 
state and local government work- 
ers who want the benefits of 
honest unionism but who reject 
the Moscow-line policies of the 
United Public Workers. 

• "The United Office and Pro- 
fessional Workers, which has in- 
sj:ituted a series of legal actions 
against the CIO, is a puny or- 
ganization of less than 30,0(X) 


members. It has failed miserably 
to organize the millions and mil- 
lions of white collar workers who 
recognize that their economic bet- 
terment must eventually come 
through the collective bargaining 
process. But the Communist- 
dominated UOPWA, though it 
can talk glibly of problems *in 
Chin^ Bulgaria or Timbuctoo, 
cannot talk the language that 
will appeal to these American 
white collar workers. 

• "The Food, Tobacco & Agri- 
cultural Workers might have be- 
come a great organization repre- 
senting the economic interests of 
millions of workers in the food- 
processing industries. Many of 
those workers are among the 
country’s most severely exploited; 
but they have constantly refused 
to join in any appreciable num- 
ber a union whose leadership has 
consistently served the political 
interests of the Communist Party 
rather than the economic inter- 
ests of its own membership, 

■■^PHERE NEED be no confu- 

■ sion in the minds of CIO 
members or the general public 
about the issues in these cases. 

"The CIO, carrying out a policy 
adopted by the representatives of 
the great majority of its mem- 


bers, is seeking to end the affilia- 
tion of any union dominated by 
the Communist Party. 

"These unions, which are charged 
with being dominated by the 
Communist Party and its agents, 
are being given full opportunity 
to present the facts to refute the 
charges filed against them. In- 
stead, they have borrowed the 
tools of the traditional enemies 
of labor to harass the CIO, to 
attempt to discredit our organi- 
zation, to interfere with our rou- 
tine activities, to belittle our 
hard-fought gains and to maxi- 
mize our set-backs. 

'‘These are the tactics of politi- 
cal adventurists, who have no re- 
gard for the fundamental welfare 
of their members. They do not 
want constructive labor organiza- 
tions which will improve the con- 
ditions of millions of unionists 
and act as a force for good on 
the American scene. The Com- 
munists feed on chaos and decay. 

"But they will find no success 
in their campaign against the 
CIO. 

‘'United, strong, dedicated to 
the American democratic ideal, 
the CiO will get on with the job 
of cleansing American labor of 
communism in order to advance 
the genuine interests of our mil- 
lions of union members.” 


PAC Work Now On 
Member ^Buek^ Basis 

CIO-PAC national office is ready to mail out receipt books for the 
start of the 1950 voluntary contributions drive, and CIO officials all 
over the country are holding preparatory meetings to lay the ground- 
work for intensive fund-raising. 

On Jan. 1, on the advice of its attorneys, PAC shifted its gt^tire 
operation to the voluntary basis, in order to satisfy the Taft-Hartley re- 
quirement that the money for union political activities in connection 
with Federal primaries and elections must come from individual mem- 
bers and not from union treasuries. 

Consequently, from now till the 1950 Congressional campaigns I 
are finished, all expenses of running the^ national office must be raised 
by individual contributions — and PAC has advised state organizations 
to do likewise. Union treasuries may be tapped only for municipal and 
state campaigns. ‘ 


2 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1950 


N 


Truman Says Budget Assures ‘Growth Of Country’ 


P RESIDENT TRUMAN has 
challenged the economy 
bloc in Congress by submit- 
ting another unbalanced 
budget for the fiscal year be- 
ginning in July in order to 
carry out his Fair Deal pro- 
gram for making America 
stronger. 

Like the budget presented a 
day earlier by the Committee for 
Economic Development, composed 
of businessmen, the President pro- 
poses to balance the budget by 
future revenues from a growing 
economy rather than from short- 
range economies that would make 
the country weaker. 

The President's budget would 
result in a deficit next year of 
$5.1 billion, but the chief execu- 
tive said it was “directed at 
achieving a budgetary balance in 
the only way in which it can be 
achieved— by measures which sup- 
port rather than impair the con- 
tinued growth of our country.” 

P OINTING OUT that 71 % of the 
proposed expenditures were to 
pay for past wars and achieve 
world peace, the President said 
only 29%, or $12.5 billion, were 
devoted to the domestic program 
aimed at a “healthy and growing 
economy.” He said he was con- 
cerned, not that this was “too 
much,” but that it might be “too 
little” for the purpose of “stimu- 
lating the realization of our coun- 
try's great potential development.” 

For the first time, the budget 
this year noted how large a per- 
centage of the proposed expendi- 
tures was devoted to building up 
the assets of the country and 
would be repaid to the goyern- 
ment either directly or indirectly 
in the future. A special tabulation 
showed that a total of $12.4 billion 
out of the total budget of $42.4 
billions would be spent for loans, 
construction, or other develop- 
ment purposes. 

Of this, $8.7 billion would be 
devoted to building up federal 



The BUOOET 

POLLAl 








^mz'Ufz>A 








THIS CHART gives an estimate of where 
Uncle Sam’s money will come from and where 
it will go in the fiscal year 1951. Budget Dir. 
Frank Pace holds a copy of the budget. Note 
the small expenditure of six cents for social 


welfare, health and security. (A health pro- 
gram and expanded old age and survivors in- 
surance would be financed by payroll levies 
paid by employe and employer, and therefore 
the chart does not show these programs.) 


assets, including military. The 
President noted that, of this $8.7 
billion, about $5.6 billion would 
“represent the acquisition of as- 
sets which are recoverable or will 
give continuing returns in future 
years, and which in normal busi- 
ness accounting would not usually 
be considered as current ex- 
penses.” This part of the budget, 
which might be considered an in- 
vestment, was higher than the 
estimated deficit. 

The President said that about 
$4 billion of this investment 


would be repaid to the govern- 
ment through repayment of loans, 
the sale of commodities, or the sale 
of power from dam projects. Much 
of the rest of this investment 
budget would go for such develop- 
ment purposes as State and local 
construction of hospitals and 
schools, research, education and 
health. 

Overall, the President’s budget 
estimates receipts during the next 
fiscal year at $37,306,000,000 and 
expenditures a t $42,493,000,000. 
This spending total is almost $1 
billion less than this year’s, rep- 


resenting chiefly cuts in foreign 
programs, and veterans’ costs. 

i|FHE PRESIDENT’S message in- 
■ eluded a strong plea for 
strengthening and expanding so- 
cial security programs, including 
national health insurance. He 
asked for broader legislation on 
old age insurance than that now 
pending in Congress, pointing to 
the increasing burden of public 
assistance for those not now 
covered. Bigger appropriations for 
housing, health and education, also 
were asked. 


HST Calls For Tripling National Income By ’55 


P RESIDENT TRUMAN, in his 
annual economic report to 
Congress, has outlined govern- 
mental and industrial policies de- 
signed to raise national produc- 
tion to $300 billion by 1955, which 
would mean an additional income 
averaging $1000 per family and 
“go far toward our goal of the 
complete elimination of poverty.” 

For government, the President's 
program calls for maintenance 
and expansion of resource de- 
velopment, educational, health, 
so-cial security and world peace 
aiitivities, and balancing the 
budget through increased eco- 
nomic activity. 

For industry, the program calls 
for maintaining or lowering cur- 
rent prices, raising wages as pro- 
ductivity rises, and increasing 
capital investment to provide for 
an expanding market. 

The. President reported that the 
nation today is “on firmer ground” 
than it was a year ago, with pro- 
duction and employment rising 
after the 1949 recession and a “re- 
newed confidence” prevailing in 
the economy. He told the legisla- 
tors that “our basic economic 
problem” now is not inflation but 
“to increase production, employ- 
ment and incomes to complete the 
recovery” and “go on to higher 
levels.” 

For the current year, the Presi- 


For story on how the Presi- 
dent’s Council of Economic Ad- 
visers rapped the steel industry 
for increasing prices, see Page 12. 

dent fixed the economic goal as 
cutting unemployment from 3^ 
million to 2, or at the most 2^ 
million, and stepping: up national 
output by about 7%, in order to 
“regain maximum employment.” 
In an accompanying report the 
Council of Economic Advisors said 
this would mean creating 2 mil- 
lion additional jobs this year. 

L ooking toward a constantly 
-expanding economy, the Presi- 
dent has now in his annual and 
economic messages to Congress 
fixed three goals for the nation. 
The first, is this year’s goal — ^to 
complete the recovery and achieve 
maximum employment. The next 
is the 1955 goal — a national in- 
come of $300 billion. The third is 
the goal for the year 2000 — na- 
tional income of one trillion dol- 
lars, which would mean triple 
today’s standard of living. 

In reaching these goals, the 
President strongly emphasized the 
increasing opportunities for pri- 
vate industry in meeting the de- 
mands of an expanding economy. 
He promised the government 
would help to reverse the down- 
ward trend of private business in- 
vestment by “certain changes,” 


which he did not specify, designed 
to “stimulate business activity.” 

The President warned, however, 
that business investments can 
continue at a high level “only if 
markets for consumer goods con- 
tinue to expand.” He added: “Price 
and wage policies should be di- 
rected at enlarging these markets. 
For only by broadening the dis- 
tribution of goods and services 
can our business system find full 
use for its expanding productive 
capacity.” 

In line with this philosophy, the 
President sharply warned indus- 
try against increasing prices, as- 
serting that there are “few, if 
any, major areas in which price 
increases would be justified under 
present circumstances” and some 
where price cuts are justified. The 
report of the Council of Economic 
Advisors hit hard at the recent 
increase in steel prices. 

T he report of the Economic 
Council spelled out for busi- 
ness in more - detail the kind of 
market it can expect with an 
expanding economy, and strongly 
urged business leaders to make 
the investments necessary to 
meet such market demands. 

For instance, the President and 
his Council said, a national pro- 
duction of $300 billion by 1955 
would mean consumer spending of 
$210 billion to $225 billion and 


would represent a tremendously 
expanded market for all indus- 
trial products from homes and 
automobiles down to pins and 
needles, and expand consumption 
of food by 10%. The average con- 
sumer expenditures would in- 
crease during the coming five 
years by 15 to 20%, the Council 
said. 

T he council took a strong 
stand against any cut in cor- 
poration taxes at this time. This, 
together with the President’s talk 
about tax revisions to “stimulate 
business expansion,” hinted that 
the Administration would propose 
cuts in the excise or sales taxes 
’on necessities such as travel, tele- 
phones, telegraph messages, and 
perhaps on such things as jewelry 
and furs,, and a longer period for 
business to balance losses against 
profits. 

About the only new legislative 
proposal in the President’s mes- 
sage was a recommendation that 
the Federal Reserve Board be 
given additional authority to regu- 
late bank reserves, including the 
reserves of non-federal reserve 
banks that belong to the FDIC 
(Federal Deposit Insurance Cor- 
poration). This has been strongly 
recommended by Marriner S. 
Eccles, a member of the reserve 
board, but will be fought by the 
the State banks. 


Action Urged 
To Combat 
Joblessness 

E mil RIEVE, administra- 
tive chairman of the CIO’s 
Full Employment Committee, 
ha's hailed the long range goals 
outlined in the economic re- 
ports of President Truman and 
the Council of Economic Ad- 
visers, but warned that imme- 
diate “practical steps” are nec- 
essary to halt recessionary 
trends and combat unemploy- 
ment. 

Text of the statement by Rieye, 
who is head of the Textile Work- 
ers Union of America, follows: 

“The nation has been given the 
vision of a more bountiful and 
prosperous America than ever be- 
fore, in the 1950 Economic Re- 
ports of President Truman and 
his Council of Economic Advisers. 
The theme of these Reports is 
that a national output in excess 
of 300 billion dollars — 40 billion 
dollars more than 1949 — can be at- 
tained by 1954, provided we adopt 
prudent policies designed to fur- 
nish useful employment to all of 
our expanding po-pulation. 

“But for 1950, these Reports 
show little evidence of practical 
steps to make necessary adjust- 
ments that will fully reverse the 
recessionary tendencies of 1949, 
and to insure progress toward the 
goal of an enlarged national out- 
put. 

“Movement toward a 300 billion 
dollar national output must in- 
volve, in the Council’s words, ‘a 
growth in consumer buying at a 
more rapid rate than the growth 
in business investment.’ This im- 
plies shifts in favor of the con- 
sumption forces in our economy, 
which the Council indicates have 
fallen to disturbingly low levels 
in the past few years. 

“|N THE FACE of the already 
■ announced steel price in- 
creases, and the general rigidity 
of consumer prices during 1949, it 
is difficult to see how mere in- 
ternal ‘recuperative forces’ of the 
economy can bring about progress 
toward these high consumption 
goals. 

“In the light of these facts and 
in the face of further prospective 
declines in business investment, it 
appears unlikely that we can ac- 
complish the President’s goal of 
reducing unemployment from the 
present level of 3^ million. 

“Indeed, in the absence of 
changes in specific economic pol- 
icy, it appears probable that in- 
stead of reducing unemployment, 
we shall face the prospect of add- 
ing to the ranks of the jobless 
when hundreds of thousands of 
new workers enter the labor mar- 
ket in 1950. 

“The President and the Council 
should take these facts into con- 
sideration when they- finally form- 
ulate the revised tax program 
which is promised in these Re- 
ports. Steps must be taken to 
raise personal income tax exemp- 
tions and to provide tax relief for 
consumers. 

“We endorse the call for pro- 
grams to insure the building of 
1 % million new residential units 
annually, which will simultane- 
ously meet a great social need 
and offer expanding employment 
and investment opportunities for 
labor and business. 

The President asked the first 
session of the 81st Congress to 
raise corporation taxes, but has 
not yet unveiled his tax program 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANCART 16, 1950 


3 


i'T" 

They’d Fight For Right To Vote, But— 

II Takes A Lot of Steam To Get Some People Qualified And Then Get Them To Polls On Election Day 

one which does the least for the people. 


By ALLAN L. SWIM 

P erhaps it's impossible for most 
persons to get all steamed up in 
January over elections which won’t 
occur until November. 

But it’s not too earlv to begin budding 
the fires which will generate the steam a 
little later. 

And you’re just kidding yourself if you 
figure that you don’t have to build fires 
under many persons to get them to exer- 
cise a right which most of them say they 
would die to defend — the right to vote. 

Every PAG block-worker who ever 
pushed a doorbell knows this is true, 

^ And you frequently find that those who 
gripe the most about the way the govern- 
ment is run are the hardest to get to the 
polls. 

N ational pac dir. jack Kroii was 
certainly right when he said that po- 
litical action is a year-around job. 

The politicians — at least the smart ones 
—work at it 12 months a year. 

So do many of the enemies of organized 
labor, who seem to be much more aware 
than the average working man or woman 
of the importance of winning elections. 


Unfortunately, too many union members 
get interested in political campaigns 
AFTER it’s too late to register and AFTER 
it’s too late to pay poll taxes in those 
states which require them. 

And too many take the view that it’s 
just too much trouble to go to the polls 
on election day. 

T he first of this year’s primaries will 
occur in less than four months. At 
least two come as early as May 2. 

The primaries are extremely important. 
Winning them in some states is tanta- 
mount to election. 

This means that CIO members in some 
parts of the nation have only a limited 
time in which to start getting up that 
steam. 

A number of contests which might re- 
sult in victory for labor in November 
probably will be lost earlier unless real 
political action campaigns get under way 
quickly. 

You start winning — or losing — elections 
a long time before the primary votes are 
counted. 

That’s because it takes organization — 
real organization — to come out on top in 
politics. 


I T’S ALL WELL AND good to sit around 
and talk about the fine things contained 
in the Fair Deal program. 

But a Pair Deal program in Truman’s 
mind and a Fair Deal program in action 
are two entirely different things. 

Truman was elected in November, 1948. 
The 81st Congres held its first session 
early in 1949. It’s now early 1950 and much 
of the President’s program is still on 
paper. 

It’s in that condition because a coalition 
of Republicans and Dixiecrats — the Dixie- 
gops — did everything it could during the 
first session of the present Congress to 
block the President’s program. 

The only place to smash this coalition or 
to make it so weak that it’s ineffective is 
at the polls. • 

And this is the year in which it could 
be done. 

A GREAT STRUGGLE is going on up on 
Capitol Hill and throughout the coun- 
try — and labor has a big stake in its out- 
come. 

It is, roughly, between those who believe 
that a good government is one which does 
the most for the most people and those 
who believe that a good government is 


The first group, of which labor is an 
important part, believes that government 
should be used to provide the people with 
the services which they want and need 
but cannot obtain through business and 
industry. 

The second group believes that govern- 
ment should keep its hands off those 
fields which business and industry have 
staked out for themselves. 

Here’s another way to say the same 
thing: 

One group believes that all of the people 
who make up our country come ahead of 
any individual, privileged group. 

The other believes the privileged groups 
should get the breaks and that the rest 
should take what’s left over. 

YES» I^S QUITE a struggle— one into 
■ which the wealthy will pour huge 
sums this year and in years to come. 

It takes dough to fight back. 

That’s why PAC is now making a push 
for $1 contributions. The contribution 
receipt books will be in the hands of local 
union oflScers in a short time. 

The money is needed soon so PAC can 
make some specific plans. There’s no better 
place to invest a buck. 


Civil Rights Again 

An old and wise friend of ours opines that the civil rights 
issue is “darn near worn out.” 

“It ought to be,” says he. “At the beginning of almost every 
session of Congress it’s taken down from the shelf, dusted off, 
kicked around and then put back on the shelf again.” 

He’s tired of such behavior. And so are we. Frankly, we’ve 
been tired of it for a long time. 

From where we sit it looks as if civil rights legislation will 
come down off the shelf again this year. 

We have a hunch that the same forces which blocked its 
passage in the past will be right in there trying to give it 
another kicking-around. 

And we also have a hunch that they may not succeed, fili- 
buster as they may. 

Nobody who has taken the trouble to investigate the situa- 
tion will deny that a certain portion of our population gets a 
rough deal because of race, creed and color discrimination. 

And it’s obvious to most people that certain types of civil 
rights abrogation could be checked or eliminated by the proper 
legislation. 

. Yet there is a group in Congress which has insisted — often 
and noisely — that the federal government has no business pok- 
ing its nose into the matter. 

This group can be trounced — and trounced badly — if other 
members of Congress who profess to believe in a real civil rights 
program will get in there and pitch for all they’re worth. 

They should. They really should — and at the present 
session ! 


flllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllillllilillitiilillllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllililllliilliiililiiilliillllillilllllililliiiiiiiil^ 





Congress of Industrial Organizations 

Philip Murray, President James B. Carey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vice Presidents: Joseph A. Beirne, L. S. Buckmaster, Joseph Curran, 
John Green, Allan S. Haywood, O. A. Knight, Walter P. 
Reuther, Emil Rieve, Frank Rosenblum. 


Allan L Swim, Editor and Publicity Director 

Assisfant Publicity Director: Henry C. Fleisher 
Assistant Editors: Hollace Ransdell, Fred Ross, Arthur Riordan, (On Leave), 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark, William Weiss 
Business Manager: Richard E. Bauer 

Editorial Office, 718 Jackson Place, N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Entered as Second Class Matter, Post Otfice, Washington, 0. C. 

Under the Act of Aug. 24, 1912 and Feb. 28. 1925. 

Vol. XIII January 16, 1950 No. 3 


Probe Of Wire Tapping Urged 


^HE AMERICAN Civil Liberties 

■ Union and the Americans for 
Democratic Action on Jan. 10 
voiced their opposition to the 
practice of wire-tapping by 
agents of the federal government. 

Newsprint ‘Trust’ 
Inquiry Asked 

^HE CIO Newspaper Guild 

■ has appealed to Congress 
to investigate the newsprint 
monopoly, in the wake of the 
demise of the N. Y. Sun. Sam 
Eubanks, ANG executive vice- 
president, has wired Rep. 
Emanuel Celler (D., N. Y.) 
asking that Celler’s committee 
investigating monopolies take 


The two organizations called on 
the Senate Judiciary Committee 
to open an immediate investiga- 
tion of “this rapidly-spreading 
evil.” , 

In a letter to Senator Pat Mc- 
Carran (D.-Nev.), head of the 
Senate Committee, they urged 
that the investigation cover the 
power of the government to em- 
ploy wire-tapping either to se- 
cure evidence or leads to evi- 
dence, the extent of wire-tapping, 
“and if it does not now do so, 
whether the Federal Communica- 
tions Act should not be amended 
so as to outlaw all such methods 
by Federal authorities.” 

The letter was signed by ACLU 
Board Chairman John Haynes 
Holmes, General Counsel Arthur 
Garfield Hays, Acting Director 
Clifford Foster, and ADA Na- 
tional Director Charles M. La 


Follette and Executive Chairman 
Joseph L. Rauh, Jr. 

Noting that recent disclosures 
of wire-tapping by federal agents 
prompted their action, the ACLU 
and ADA officials stated that 
“fundamental rights such as con- 
fidential communications between 
attorney and client, husband and 
wife, parent and child, doctor and 
patient, minister and parishioner 
seem to be in jeopardy.” 

They added they always con- 
sidered wire-tapping as an “in- 
vasion of the right of privacy and 
a serious infringement of civil 
liberties. In our opinion the Fed- 
eral Communications Act prohib- 
its all forms of wire-tapping, and 
we call to your attention the 
various decisions of the U. S. 
Supreme Court which have 
strongly criticized and barred 
these practice in federal cases.” 


up the matter. 

Celler was ill last week, but 
his associates reported that he 
was interested in the proposal. 

Eubanks said the newsprint 
monopoly over supply and prices 
“is a major factor in destruction 
of newspaper properties,” and 
cited the 104% price increase 
since 1939. He cited “enormous 
profits of newsprint producers to- 
tally unrelated to any reasonable 
measure of fair return on mill 
investment,” and charged “exces- 
sive newsprint costs in the last 
three years have contributed to 
death of newspapers, unemploy- 
ment of newspaper craftsmen and 
impaired the ability of many pub- 
lishers to provide adequate eco- 
nomic security for their em- 
ployes.” 

Eubanks said capacity of Cana- 
dian mills exceeds demand but 
that prices will be maintained 
artificially in 1950 “to the further 
injury of the newspaper industry 
in the United States.” 

(The Sun, in folding, emphasized 
that the chief factor was the “un- 
reasonable demands of unions” but 
at that time the New York Guild 
reported no wage increases had been 
given by the Sun last year. Other 
newspaper publishers have shrieked 
about union demands. There is 
nothing to indicate that, they are 
doing anything about the gouge in 
newsprint prices.) 



“Who stole the pie I stole from Smitty?” 


^ THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1950 


N 


DOLLARS AND SENSE 



Robert Nathan Says: 


'We Can And Must Expand Our Living Standards' 


Unionist Borrowed 
Wheelbarrow 

And--- 

\ 

I T ALL STARTED because Nature 
saw fit to create a rock formation 
at a spot which eventually became a 
front yard. 

Because of the rock, a CIO representative 
was puffing and grunting one afternoon. 

A neighbor — a stranger to the CIO man 
— ^walked past, stopped and watched a 
minute or two and then said: 

“You’ll break your back carrying those 
big chunks of rock out of your yard. Why 
don't you come over to the house and let 
me lend you my wheelbarrow.” 

The CIO man jumped at the invitation— 
and as a result the . CIO soon had a new 
union. 

A fter his yard was cleared of rock 
the CIO representative returned the 
wheelbarrow and thanked his neighbor for 
it. 

Then he introduced himself and said he 
thought he'd enjoy living in his new home.' 

“Say, I’m the president of a union, but 
it’s not much good because we can’t take 
in Negro members,” the neighbor said. 

He explained that he was a school custo- 
dian, that he and his fellow workers really 
needed union protection. 

But, he added, there were a large num- 
ber of Negro custodians who^ were barred 
from menibership. 

“Why don’t you get into the CIO?” he 
was asked. 

“By golly, that sounds like a good idea. 
How do you go about it?” 

T he CIO MAN shook his head and said, 
“I don’t know whether there’s a union 
set-up here that can take care of you. You 
see, I’ve just been in town a short time. 

“I’ll do some checking on the situation 
and let you know what can be done. i# 

“One thing you can count on: If there’s 
not a good union here that you can join 
I’ni going to suggest that you stay with 
the one you’ve got.” 

The next day he learned that there was 
a suitable local union with which the cus- 
todians could become affiliated. That night 
he called on his neighbor. 

S AID THE CIO man: “I found out to- 
day there’s a good set-up here that you 
can join if you want to drop your present 
affiliation.” 

“That sounds good to me,” replied the 
neighbor. “What do I do next?” 

“First tell me this: Do you have any 
written contracts under which you’re work- 
ing?” ^ 

“No, we don’t,” 

“Then it seems to me that about all you’ll 
have to do is to hold a meeting and 
get a majority of your members to vote to 
come, into the CIO.” 

“OK, I’ll do it. Sounds simple to me.” 

“Better let me send out a representative 
of the union I’m talking about so he can 
give you the low-down.” 

“OK.” 

A bout lO days passed before the neigh- 
bors got together again and when they 
did the custodian extended his hand and 
said, “Hello, brother.” 

“I take that to mean you’re now in the 
CIO,” said the CIO representative. 

“Yep, went off slick as a whistle. I got 
’em to put it to a vote and they voted for 
the CIO. It looks like we’re going tcTha’^ 
a good union at last.” 

The custodian paused, grinned,, then 
said : 

“I told my wife this morning that if I 
get a raise out of that contract we’re going 
to negotiate it will be because I happened 
to have an old wheelbarrow!” 

A. L. S. 


Excerpts from a radio talk by Robert R. 
Nathan, economist, who broadcasts each 
week for the CIO. 

I N THE PAST two weeks President Tru- 
man and his advisers have given us five 
documents which are probably the most 
important economic statements ever issued 
by the Government. These include the 
Presdent’s Budget, Economic, and State of 
the Union messages, plus the Annual Re- 
port and the Economic Review of the Coun- 
cil of Economic Advisers. They interpret 
the past, evaluate the present and offer 
a program for the future. 

There is one common theme which runs 
through all of these documents — the theme 
of expansion and progress. There is re- 
peated emphasis that we can and must 
expand far beyond present production and 
living standards, and that the benefits of 
this growth must extend to all groups in 
our society. 

In setting higher production goals for 
the future, it was not necessary to resort 
to black magic. Merely studying the past 
gives us a reasonable basis for knowing 
what we can accomplish in the years 
ahead. The novelty is in the fact that the 
President of these powerful United States 
has presented clearly defined national ob- 
jectives and has spelled out the way in 
which they can be achieved. 

T hebe is a restatement of faith in the 
free enterprise system. Business growth 
and development is encouraged. A strong 
plea is made for cooperation between busi- 
ness and government. Businessmen are 
complimented, along with workers and 
farmers, for their greater judgment and 
restraint in the “safe passage from infla- 


tion to greater stability.” That is how 
President Truman describes the 1949 re- 
cession. 

Does all this mean that the Adminis- 
tration is trying to extend kind words 
and soft soap to the business community 
for political purposes? I do not think so. 

Intelligent leaders in the business com- 
munity are fearful of booms and busts. 
They understand that jobless people are 
poor customers. But the big question comes 
in deciding what should be done to pro- 
mote stability and by whom. 

M ost disagreement concerns the 
role of government. Firmly, but in 
soft tones", the Council of Economic Ad- 
visers sticks to its position that govern- 
ment must provide the environment in 
which businessmen and the workers and 
the farmers can enjoy uninterrupted prog- 
ress. 


Confused? 

About economics and buying power — 
about government and business policies? 

Then turn your radio dials each Tues- 
day night to ROBERT R. NATHAN. 

Robert Nathan — lecturer, author, econ- 
omist- — talks in simple language about 
some of the big, confusing problems of the 
times. 

He’s heard each Tuesday night, on the 
CIO’s own radio program. 

Tuesday nights; 10:45 P.M. EST; ABC 
network. 

^ Tune him in this week on your local 
ABC station. 


This simply means that the Administra- 
tion is not backing away from the simple 
proposition which the American public 
has increasingly recognized over the past 
15 years — namely, that government does 
have an important responsibility and must 
play a dynamic and not a passive role 
in economic affairs. 

Large business investment means- ex- 
pansion in plants and machinery and 
equipment. This capacity will be profitable 
only if there is a corresponding rise in 
consumption. 

Put in other words, we must consume 
more and more as our productive capacity 
increases, if that capacity is to be used 
fully and continuously. . . . 

T he council of Economic Advisers 
follows naturally by pointing out that 
private and public policies must succeed 
in raising the level of consumption, which 
is not now suffioiently high for sustained 
full employment. 

If consumption is not adequate to take 
off the market what industry can produce, 
the trouble does not arise from our people 
not wanting to consume more than they 
no/w consume. It is a matter of buying 
power and how our income is distributed. 
I’m certain that very few of our listeners 
would find it hard to use more and better 
housing, clothing, food and services^. It is 
a matter of having the wherewithal to buy 
what we need and want. 

It does seem foolish for us to resign our- 
selves to recurring depressions or reces- 
sions with unemployment and closed plants 
merely because we haven’t been willing to 
develop policies and techniques to assure 
adequate buying power. 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1960 


5 



Required Reading For NAM 

Enlightened Businessmen Back HT’s Proposals 


Proposed ^Investments^ 

In Nation^ s Future 

Here are some of the major new programs for which the President 


included funds in his budget: 

Expansion of public assistance programs $200,000,000 

Expansion of vocational rehabilitation 4,000,000 

Aid to medical education 30,000,000 

Increased public health facilities 4,500,000 

Health services for school children 25,000,000 

Co-op housing for middle-income families 50,000,000 

Increased material and child welfare grants 6,900,000 

Federal aid to education 290,000,000 

Other education aids, including scholarships 30,000,000 

St. Lawrence Seaway 4,000,000 

Expanded unemployment insurance 12,400,000 

Industrial safety program 6,000,000 

Unemployment insurance for federal workers 113,400,000 


By NATHAN ROBERTSON 

For Labor Press Association 

T he biggest battle in this 
session of Congress is be- 
tween President Truman and 
the conservatives over the 
Fair Deal spending program. 
The biggest news in that bat- 
tle is that a group of prom 
inent and highly respected 
businessmen are on the Presi- 
dent’s side, rather than on the 
side of the Byrds in Congress. 

The businessmen are those be- 
longing to the Committee for 
Economic Development (CED). 
They are not self-serving propa- 
gandists such as the men who 
are running the National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers. They are 
serious-minded and enlightened 
businessmen who have taken the 
trouble to sit down with experts 
and study the budget problems 
of the government and try to 
come up with honest answers. 

The answers they have come 
up with are very close to the 
answers reached by the experts 
who helped President Truman 
frame his budget. They call for 
continued spending of the kind 
recommended by President Tru- 
man to build and' strengthen the 
country so that the budget can 
be balanced, not by cutting neces- 
sary expenditures, but by in- 
creased revenues from improved 
and expanded production. 

. The President’s budget calls for 
expenditures of about $42 billion. 
The NAM budget is set at about 
$33 billion, and the Byrds in 
Congress are proposing a budget 
of about $37 billion. The big dif- 
ference between these budgets is 
chiefly the amount to be spent 
for such things as health and ed- 
ucation, public works such as dams 
and power projects, and construc- 
tion of schools and hospitals. 

^HE ISSUE between these two 
* schools of thought is very 
clear. The President feels it is 
sound to build for the future 
even if it means a temporary de- 
ficit at a time when 3,500,000 
people are unemployed. 

The Byrds and the NAM propa- 

Second Cal. Local 
Quits Office Union 

The 100 members of the Oak- 
land, Cal., Newsvendors local of 
the United Office & Professional 
Workers by unanimous vote have 
quit the UOPWA, and have been 
issued a charter by National CIO 
as Local Industrial Union 768. 
Six weeks ago the Los Angeles 
Newsvendors also quit UOPWA 
and received a new CIO charter 
as LIU 75. 


Afoul Of Law 

An Eightieth Congress Repub- 
lican who voted for tfie Taft- 
Hartley law is running afoul of 
the law. 

Ex-Rep. James Scoblick (R. 
Pa.) has been indicted in Scran- 
ton, not for violating T-H — but 
for allegedly issuing worthless 
checks in an amount of over 
$ 1 , 200 . 

Scoblick, who served in both 
the 79th and 80th Congresses, 
had only two “right” votes out 
of 16 in the 1^47-48 sessions, 
judged by CIO standards. He 
was succeeded by Harry P. 
O’Neill (D), who voted “right” 
on every issue in the 1949 CIO 
Voting Record. 


gandists believe it is more im- 
portant to balance the budget 
than to see that people have 
enough to eat, enough houses, or 
enough medical care. The NAM 
has even taken the position that 
the budget should be balanced in 
times of depression. 

Now the CED has stepped into 
the middle of this controversy 
with a budget that takes the 
ground out from under the Byrds 
and the NAM. Its budget calls 
for a^ut the same kind of spend- 
ing Truman has proposed and 
totals $40 billion. That $40 bil- 
lion, however, is based on a high 
level of employment with no more 
than 2 V 2 million unemployed. 
^HE CED concedes that in times 
• like these with 3 V 2 million 
unemployed it may not be pos- 
sible to balance President Tru- 
man’s budget without too much 
ultimate cost to the country eco- 
nomically. It wants to set a level 
of spending and taxing that will 
balance the budget when the un- 
employed have jobs. That’s about 
what President Truman proposed. 

Most newspaper stories about 


the CED report did not sound 
that way. That is because the 
CED presented a budget that 
showed, instead of a deficit, a 
surplus of $5 billion that would 
permit a tax cut of more than 
$2 billion, and permit paying $3 
billion on the public debt. But 
study of the two documents 
showed many close parallels be- 
tween the President’s and the 
CED’s budgets, not only in 
figures but in language. 

The CED, for instance, strongly 
supports many of the President’s 
programs for such things as ex- 
panded social security and appro- 
priations for health and edu- 
cation. It wants spending to con- 
tinue for needed public works 
that will increase the productive 
power of the country. Its budget 
would not be balanced until eco- 
nomic conditions improve. 

VHESE ARE NOT New Deal 
■ businessmen. They are 4)ig 
middle-of-the-road businessmen 
such as Marion B. Folsom, of 
Eastman Kodak; J. Cameron 
Thomson, a Minneapolis banker; 
John D. Biggers, of Libbey- 


Owens-Ford Glass Co.; S. Bayard 
Colgate, of the soap company; 
Ernest Kanzler, of Universal 
Credit Corp.; Clarence Francis, 
of General Foods; and George L. 
Harrison of New York Life, to 
name a few. 

The position taken by these 
businessmen gives strong hope 
that a meeting of the minds be- 
tween business and labor leaders 
on major economic policy is not 
far off. Enlightened businessmen 
are beginning to realize that the 
public policies for which labor 
has been standing are good not 
only for labor, but also for the 
whole country, business as well 
as labor. 

THE CED has pro- 
posed, in addition to cutting 
the excise or sales taxes, which 
labor would also like to cut, is 
this : It proposes to withhold 
taxes on dividends just as em- 
ployers withhold income taxes for 
workers from pay envelopes. This 
would provide a system of cur- 
rent collection on dividends just 
as the government now collects 
currently as you earn on your 
income. 

The joker, if any, is that what 
the corporation collects and turns 
into the government as taxes on 
dividends could be subtracted 
from the taxes the corporation 
pays on its earnings. At the 
present rate of declaring divi- 
dends this would mean a cut of 
20%, or perhaps a little more, 
in corporation taxes. 

For example, take a corporation 
which makes a profit of $1 mil- 
lion and pay dividends of $500,000. 
At present it pays 38% on the 
million dollars, or $380,000. Under 
the new plan it would continue 
to ^ay $380,000, but $83,000 of 
this would represent collections 
in advance on the dividends paid 
to stockholders. The corporation 
would be paying this $83,000 for 


the stockholders, instead of hav- 
ing them pay the tax themselves 
as at present. In the end the 
stockholders would pay exactly 
the same as they do now But the 
corporation, instead of paying 
taxes of $380,000, would get credit 
for the $83,000 and pay only $297,- 
000. This would be a cut of 22% 
in its taxes. 

(Ed. Note: As stated above, the 
corporoitions currently, pay a 38% 
tax. Assuming a 50% distribution 
on dividends, the CED proposal 
would reduce the effective rate of 
the corporation tax to 30%. The 
CIO doesn’t indorse this proposal 
and has proposed an increase in 
corporation taxes.) 

This plan has been proposed 
by the CED as a means of cur- 
tailing the so-called double tax- 
ation of corporation earnings. In 
addition to the 38% which a 
corporation pays on its es^rnings, 
the stockholders are taxed on the 
remaining earnings, sometimes as 
high as 70 or 80%. The result is 
that some stockholders realize 
very little on their investments. 

Shoe Firms 
Try To Evade 
j75c Statute 

S HOE manufacturers are trying 
to evade the new 75c mini- 
mum wage that goes into effect 
. Jan. 25 by seeking to use a pro- 
vision of the law permitting 
“learners” to be paid under the 
minimum, the CIO charged last 
week at a public hearing. 

The administration of the Labor 
Dept.’s Wage and Hour and Pub- 
lic Contracts divisions called the 
hearings authorized under the 
Fair Labor Standards Act. 

The National Shoe Manufactur- 
ers Association, representing the 
big shoe concerns in the industry, 
is asking that a 57%c minimum be 
set for “learners” for a three to 
six months’ period. Its spokesmen 
claim that around 20% of the 
workers in a shoe factory are 
hired as learners. 

Testimony refuting the indus- 
try’s claims was presented for 
the National CIO by Asst. Counsel 
Elliot Bredhoff, and by Attorney 
Mitchell Cooper for the United 
Shoe Workers. ^ 

Bredhoff pointed out that the 
shoe manufacturers had never 
claimed at previous hearings held 
under the Act that they had 
learners. He charged that they 
were now attempting to use a 
technicality of the amended law 
which goes into effect Jan. 25 to 
pay substandard wages to un- 
skilled workers by claiming they 
were learners. 

To obtain a rate for learners 
below the legal 75c minimum, the 
industry must show that oppor- 
tunities of employment are cur- 
tailed unless companies are per- 
mitted to hire learners at lower 
rates. Bredhoff said that so far 
industry spokesmen have pre- 
sented no figures to show this. 

All they have cited are high 
turnover rates, and these are 
mostly caused, he declared, by 
dissatisfaction of workers with 
the low wages paid them. They 
leave the industry whenever they 
can to take higher paying jobs in 
other industries. 

The AFL had no representatives 
at the hearings last week, but pre- 
sented a statement agreeing to 
accept a 70c minimum for learn- 
ers. The hearings will continue 
all this week. 


Organizationally Speaking 



By ALLAN S. HAYWOOD 

The writer has just returned froiji a Southern 
Organizing Committee Conference 
presided over by Southern Organiz- v 
ing Director George Baldanzi. This 
conference was held in Atlanta, Ga., 
and was attended by the state di- 
rectors engaged in the Southern 
Drive. 

It is interesting to note that 
“Texas Bill” Strength with the I 
guitar is now on the CIO staff in ^ 
the South. He plays and sings 
American folk songs. Director Bal- 
danzi has planned a series of broadcasts for “Texas 
Bill.” All international organizations and state 
councils in the territory will be called upon to 
keep their members advised of these broadcasts. 

I note that in Chicago two ofldcers of the UE 
have made public statements denouncing the UE. 
Both of these ofiftceris have resigned from the UE. 
It is reported that Ernest DeMaio, Vice-President 
of District 11, UE, is walking around with a very 
red face. It is stated that he had, full knowledge 
of the communist actions and never once opposed 
such actions. 

Field Rep. Lee Lundgren and Business Manager 
Irving Krane, both of Local 1150 UE, in their state- 
ments, point out that the apparatus of the UE is 
controlled by the Communist Party in such a 
manner to make it impossible for the UE members 
to run their union in the manner they see fit. Lee 
Lundgren said he had participated in Communist 
Party meetings that were held to control the 
affairs of the UE. He said Local 1150 Pres. Pat 
Amato; Secretary of UE District Council 11, Alice 
Smith; UE International Field Organizer Fred 
Dutner; and a Communist party organizer, Sam 
Kushner, attended these Communist Party meet- 


ings, in violation of the resolution passed at the 
CIO convention at Atlantic City. The free American 
trade -unionist will overcome this Communist con- 
spiracy to enslave members of the American labor 
movement. 

The writer attended a conference of CIO direc- 
tors, field representatives, staff organizers, inter- 
national representatives in Ohio Jan. 14, during 
the session of the Ohio CIO Council Convention 
in Cincinnati. This conference was held to obtain 
for the lUE-CIO the fullest degree of cooperation 
and assistance from all CIO members and afiiliates. 
Also discussed ■ was assistance to the Communica- 
tion Workers of America in a coming NLRB elec- 
tion campaign in Ohio. 

Shoe Workers Rep. Dave Wilson reports that in 
a representation election held at the Wessling 
Jordan Shoe Co., Eldon, Mo., the workers voted 111 
for the Shoe Workers to 60 for no union. Joe 
Stuermen, Herbert Long and Leo Cassidy were in 
charge of the campaign. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Hugh Thompson announces that 
the Newspaper Guild won bargaining rights at the 
Jamestown (N. Y.) Daily Sun. The organizing was 
under the direction of Pres. Thomas Rose, of the 
Buffalo Local of the Guild. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Robert McVay reports that the 
Oil Workers Inti. Union won an NLRB representa- 
tion election at the Sinclair Plant in Sand Springs, 
Okla, The vote was unanimous in favor the 
OWIU-CIO. Arthur Cross represented the union 
in this election. 

Adolph Germer, Director of Organization, Wood- 
workers, reports that the IWA-CIO won an import- 
ant NLRB Representation election at the Weyer- 
haeuser plant, Springfield, Ore., as follows: Eligible 
561; IWA-CIO 265; UBC&J-AFL 219; no union 10; 
challenged by the board 18. IWA-CIO Reps. Jim 
Lee, T. C. Stout, George Hill and Bill Baker par- 
ticipated in this election campaign. 


N 


6 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1950 



CIO Pamphlet On CVA 


posed to the exploitation of the 
region “by remorseless mopopolis- 
tic combines interested only in 
their own private profit/’ 

A COMBINATION of iforces, 
none of which has ever been 
friendly to organized labor, are 
arrayed in opposition to a CVA. 
Among these are privately owned 
electric utilities; timber interests; 
the Army’s Corps of Engineers 
and the contractors back of it; 
the Bureau of Reclamation and 
the special interests (not farm- 
ers) and “selfish groups every- 
where who object to the govern- 
ment’s doing a good job for the 
people.’’ 

Although a CVA does not give 
the whole answer— “how it be- 
haves will depend partly on the 
kind of men that are put in 
charge of it’’ — it will “help put an 


E ver since the CIO was 
formed about 14 years 
ago,, it has given an important 
place in its program and pol- 
icies to the need of protecting 
and using the country’s rich 
natural resources for the bene- 
fit of all the peof)le. 

A current example of CIO’s 
concern over this problem, is a 
new pamphlet, “The Magnificent 
Columbia,*’ just issued by the 
CIO Dept, of Education & Re- 
search. 

The pamphlet, which describes 
a proposed over-all plan for a 
Columbia Valley Authority, along 
the lines of the TVA, was pre- 
pared by the , CIO Committee on 
Regional Development and Con- 
servation. CIO Councils Dir. 
John Brophy is chairman of the 
committee, and Anthony W. Smith 
is executive secretary. 

The pamphlet deals with the 
planning problems of one valley, 
the Columbia, and one region, the 
Pacific Northwest, but most of 
the problems covered will arise 
in the other major river basins, 
the foreword explains. “We have 
been concerned with them for a 
long time in the Missouri Valley. 
We are trying to apply the ex- 
perience gained in the Tennessee 
Valley. 

■■ DEVELOPMENT plans tor the 
^ Northwest are of concern 
to the entire country, partly be- 
cause, for better or worse, they 
will tend to become the model 
for the country. For this reason 
the pamphlet is intended for use 
among CIO people in all our re- 
gional planning work.’’ 

The valley of “the Magnificent 
Columbia,’’ and the country 
around it, America’s great Pacific 
Northwest, is one of the world’s 
richest regions in natural re- 
sources,’’ the pamphlet states. 

“If its water power, forests, 
soils and minerals can be de- 
veloped in a balanced program for 
the good of all, they will bring 
happiness to 'hundreds of thou- 
sands of people. But there are 
dangers; much of this great 
wealth, can be lost if it is de- 
veloped recklessly and destruc- 
tively.” 

The pamphlet urges a program 
based on the “commonsense de- 
velopment of all the resources of 
the Pacific Northwest under a 
sensible, balanced plan,” as op- 


Science Writer Shatters 
Myths About Tuberculosis 


T uberculosis is no longer a 
disease of youth. It now finds 
its victims more and more among 
men and women in middle life. 

The belief that people in their 
SCys or 40’s are safe from TB is 
one of the many myths about the 
disease without scientific basis, 
says a 20-cent pamphlet “TB — 
The Killer Cornered,” just pub- 
lished by the Public Affairs Com- 
mittee, 22 East 38th St, New York 
16, N. Y, 

Half the deaths now come at 
ages over 46, says Alton L. Blakes- 
lee, science writer,' who prepared 
the pamphlet with the coopera- 
tion of the Natl. Tuberculosis 
Association. 

Other myths shattered by mod- 
ern science include such ideas as 
that a change of climate is the 
best treatment for TB, and that 
the disease may be inherited or 
caught from a person who has 
recovered from it. 

One fiction that has proved 
particularly harmful to wage 


earners is that . anyone who has 
had the disease is not good for 
much work and makes a bad risk 
as an employe. The pamphlet, 
quotes recent studies to show that 
former TB patients “were not 
absent from work more than 
others, nor did they suffer any 
more injuries.” As a matter of 
fact, the former TB patients had 
a better record of staying on their 
jobs than other workers. 

In 1900 TB killed 194 of every 
100,000 Americans. By 1940 the 
death rate went down to 45.8. In 
1948, it was only 30 per 100,000. 

There is hope of eliminating 
the disease, with the aid of new 
discoveries in research, if the facil- 
ities for fighting TB are strengh- 
ened, says Blakeslee. All Ameri- 
cans are urged to press for more 
and stronger state and local 
health services, as well as an in- 
crease in the number oi hospital 
beds for people sick with TB. And 
everyone is urged by the pam- 
phlet to have a yearly chest 
X-ray. 


AHjjKiAL viLiw 01 Uiand Coulee Dam on 
Columbia River: A great deal of new hydro- 
power will be coming into the region through 
this dam in the next few years. The 11th and 
12th generators installed in 1949 after the 


power shortage had become acute, together 
with new generators yet to be installed, will 
bring in 864,000 kilowatts. Above this dam 
are the proposed Albeni Falls, Libby and Hun- 
gry Horse projects, now under construction. 


How To Order 
CVA Pamphlet 

Copies of “The Magnificent 
Columbia,” the case for a Colum- 
bia Valley Authority that can 
develop all the resources of the- 
Northwest under a well-balanced, 
long range plan, may be ordered 
from the CIO Publicity Dept., 
718 Jackson PI., N.W., Washing- 
ton 6, D. C. Price 15c each, 10 
for $1, 100 for $8, 1,000 for $75. 


end to the selfish exploitation of 
the resources of the valley by 
special interest groups working 
through their particular govern- 
ment bureaus,” the pamphlet says. 

“We are putting the emphasis 
on sound human goals in the use 
of natural resources. We consider 
that CVA, if properly set up and 
managed, and if properly related 
to good social objectives, can be 
one method among others for get- 
ting sensible resource develop- 
ment.” 

Some examples of the natural 
resources of the Columbia Valley 
which need to be safeguarded are 
discussed in the pamphlet. 

Its waterpower gives it “more 
potential hydroelectric power than 
any other comparable area in the 
world.” • 

^HE PAMPHLET makes the 
■ following points : 

• The forests of the Pacific 
Northwest, with its huge stands 
of Douglas fir," western hemlock 
and Ponderosa pine, are the re- 
gion’s largest asset, as well as a 
big asset to the country as a 
whole, for it holds our last large 
supply of heavy construction 
timber. 

• Another valuable resource, the 
fisheries, now threatened with 
destruction under the programs 
of the Army Engineers and the 
Reclamation Bureau, could be pro- 
tected under a plan coordinated 
with a hydro-power program. 

• One of the big assets of the 
Columbia Valley is its phosphate 
rock deposits, which can be made 


into valuable fertilizer, as at TVA. 
Soil conservation is a serious 
problem in the great Northwest, 
where soil erosion is probably 
worse than anywhere else in the 
country. 

»Y PROPER planning and de- 
” velopment, all resources of 
the region can be used, the 
pamphlet states, “to provide good 
living and working conditions and 
real prosperity for all the people 
of the Columbia Valley, and to 
develop and conserve the re- 
sources of the Valley for the 
benefit of all the people of Amer- 
ica.” 

Unless done carefully, however, 
the CIO pamphlet warns, the de- 
velopmen;t job may make condi- 
tions much worse instead of bet- 
ter. “It is imperative that pol- 
icies be followed in regional de- 
velopment, including the location 
of dams and transmission lines, 
the location of reclamation pro- 
jects, and the granting of con- 
tracts for the supply of water 
and electric power, which will 
bring about an even and orderly 
distribution of population 
throughout the region.” 

The CIO supports Pres. Tru- 
man’s call for passage of CVA 
legislation, although it believes 
these bills should be strength- 
ened. It is firmly against plans 
“drummed up by the Army En- 
gineers and the Bureau of Recla- 
mation — the so-called Pick-Sloan 
Plan.” 

The pamphlet urges all CIO 
member^ in the Columbia /Valley 
and the whole country “to fight 
for a program of well-rounded 
development and conservation of 
the resources of the magnificent 
Columbia Valley.” 

Bucks For PAC Are 
Knockout Drops 
To Lick Labor-Hating 
Dixiegops 


‘Northwest Development Concerns Entire Nation’ 


Pap er Scoffs 
At Charges 
Of Socialism 

T he STAND of the Natl. Recla- 
mation Association against the 
proposed valley authorities on the 
grounds that they lead to social- 
ism and regimentation is carac- 
terized as “a lot of nonsense” in 
the following editorial from the 
Bismarck (N. D.) Leader: 

The National Reclamation As- 
sociation, an organization mainly 
financed by the private power 
utilities, held its annual conven- 
tion recently and re-elected Hariy 
Polk of Williston as its national 
president. Besides acting as a 
front for the United States Bu- 
reau of Reclamation and the pow- 
er trust, the NRA also has its 
fingers in several other pies. 

S OME OF ITS members would 
like to abolish the 16()-acre 
limitation on lands irrigated by 
governmental projects. In other 
words, the small, family-size 
farmer would be squeezed out, 
while the big landowners could 
reap profits from projects paid 
for by thp taxpayers of the na- 
tion. 

That measure failed of adop- 
tion at the convention, but the 
NRA sparkplugs will try again 
and American farmers should 
keep a sharp eye on them in the 
future. 

The organization also came out, 
as usual, against “valley authori- 
ties.” The hand of the power 
trust is plain enough there, al- 
though Mr. Polk and other NRA 
leaders say they oppose authori- 
ties on the grounds that they lead 
to “socialism” and “regimenta- 
tion.” 

T HAT’S A LOT of nonsense. All 
public dams or irrigation proj- 
ects are “socialism,” whether 
they’re built by TVA engineers. 
Army engineers or Reclamation 
engineers. So are our public 
schools and our federal highways 
“socialism.” Yet we haven’t 
heard of the NRA advocating 
their abolition. 

And as for “regimentation,” it 
couldn’t be worse than it is under 
the Pick-Sloan plan. The Army 
Engineers and the Bureau of Rec- 
lamation are complete and total 
dictators. Congress appropriates 
the funds for the projects; after 
that, the Army ’ and the bureau 
take over and are the sole bosses. 

U NDER AN MVA there would 
be five directors right here in 
the valley, responsible to the peo- 
ple of the valley and probably 
chosen from among residents of 
the valley. 

Under the Pick-Sloan plan a lot 
of Army generals and bureau en- 
gineers who never saw the valley 
and know nothing about its prob- 
lems come in and take over. They 
are against authorities, quite nat- 
urally, becaqse they want to keep 
their jobs and appropriations and 
prestige. So they get front or- 
ganizations like the NRA to 
stooge for them and declare that 
everybody is against MVA. 

The real truth is this: Every- 
body is against MVA — except the 
people of the Missouri Valley. 

Patricia Ann Carey 
Is Seriously Hurt 

CIO Secy.-Treas. James Carey’s 
eight-year-old daughter, Patricia 
Ann, was struck by an auto and 
seriously injured Jan. 6. Late last 
week she had improved somewhat 
but was still unconscious, hospital 
authorities reported. 

Patricia Ann was injured while 
on her way to school. 

The Careys have one other 
child, James Jr., 11. 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 196« 



Lee Lun4gren, 


Cana^an Labor Unites Three Leaders Quit UE, 

Charging CP Control 


To War on Joblessness 


C ANADIAN labor officials 
are pressuring their gov- 
ernment to take quick, con- 
structive action to alleviate 
unemployment in Canada, 

“Our chief concern is what 
action the government proposes 
to take to remedy the situation 
and how quickjy it will get under 
way such projects it has 
planned," said Pres. Percy R. 
Bengough of the Trades and La- 
bor Congress and Pres. A. R. 
Mosher of the Canadian Congress 
of Labor. 

“If government projects are too 
long delayed, they will become 
nothing more than relief meas- 
ures. 


“On the other hand, prompt ac- 
' tion by the government will un- 
doubtedly be helpful not only in 
meeting the present situation but 
in preventing the onset of a seri- 
ous depression." 

Mosher estimated a short time 
ago that unemployed in Canada 
totaled about 300,000 or 6% of 
the nation’s labor force. He 
charged that the government had 
released no figures on unemploy- 
ment for three months. 

After the charge was made, 
Minister of Labor Mitchell issued 
a press statement confirming the 
300,000 estimate. Bengough and 
Mosher said in a joint statement 
that “it is likely that the situa- 
tion is actually worse at the pres- 
ent time." 


FTC Would Stop Price 
‘Packing’ In Auto Financing 


T he federal Trade Commis- 
sion has announced it has a 
plan designed to eliminate and 
prevent concealed “packing" and 
other deceptive practices in the 
sale and financing of automobiles 
purchased on the installment plan. 
- The Commission decided to look 
into the matter following com- 
plaints from members of Con- 
gress, Better Business Bureaus 
and individuals, which indicated 

Court Enjoins 
MMSW Pickets 

Striking members of the CIO 
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers 
were enjoined from sending pick- 
ets to blo^k the entrances to the 
pits of three big potash produc- 
ers at Carlsbad, N. Mex. 

The injunction was granted by 
ex-Sen. Carl A. Hatch, now judge 
of a U. S. District Court, at the 
request of Robert N. Denham, 
general counsel of the NLRB. 
The 1500 strikers walked out 
Nov. 19 in an effort to win a 25c 
pay boost. Present basic wage is 
$1.60 an hour. 

The three companies. Potash 
Co. of America, U. S. Potash Co. 
and Inti. Minerals & Chemicals 
Corp., produce 85% of the na- 
tion’s potash, a substance vital 
in commercial fertilizers. Den- 
ham, in asking for the writ, said 
a national fertilizer crisis loomed. 

Home Construction 

Seven billion dollars, only 
slightly less than in 1948, was in- 
vested in 1949 on new private 
home construction, the Labor 
Dept, announced Jan. 1. 


Convention Issue 
Still Available 

Although there has been ex- 
ceptionally heavy demand for 
the 1949 convention issue of the 
CIO News, several thousand 
copies are still available. 

Union leaders report the con- 
vention issue — which gives full 
details of the CIO’s decision to 
rid itself of communistic influ- 
ences — has been used effectively 
in organizing drives. 

Copies can be secured from 
the CIO News, 718 Jackson 
Place, N.W., Washington 6, D.C. 

Rates for bundle orders are 
2c per copy for quantities up to 
1000, l%c per copy for quan- 
tities between 1000 and 2000 
and 1^4c per copy for quantities 
of more than 2000. 


that through the practice of 
“packing," fictitious amounts or 
overcharges are deceptively con- 
cealed from automobile pur- 
chasers in sale and installment 
contracts. 

More than 50,000 copies of the 
proposed rules have been mailed 
to automobile dealers, auto manu- 
factures, financing organizations 
and other interested parties. 

If the proposed rules are put 
into effect by FTC, sellers of auto- 
mobiles will be required to furn- 
ish the purchaser an itemization 
in writing at the time of the sale, 
listing the cash delivered price, 
insurance cost, finance charges 
and other item included in the 
total cost. 


W HILE NLRB representa- 
tion hearings on the 
lUE-UE fight droned monoto- 
nously into their second and 
third weeks, three UE officials 
in the Chicago area tossed 
explosive resignations at the 
crumbling left-wing outfit.. 

The officials, one of whom re- 
signed simultaneously from the 
Communist Party, accompanied 
their resignations . with bitter 
charges of direct communist con- 
trol of Chicago UE locals, totali- 
tarian dictatorship and commu- 
nist affiliation of other local and 
district UE leaders. 

The three are: 

Irving Krane, attorney and busi- 
ness manager of UE Local 1150 
for the p^st seven years; former 
Communist; delegate to the 1947 
and 1948 UE conventions; member 
of, or participant in, numerous 
communist front organizations. 

Lee Lundgren, field representa- 
tive of UE Local 1150 and an 
organizer and official of the local 
since 1944; avowed member of the 
Communist Party and member of 
various communist front organi- 
zations. 

Ragnar Lofgren, chief steward 
of the Sunbeam unit of UE Local 
1150; long time leader in local 
union affairs. 

T he signed statements of both 
Krane and Lundgren gave 
conclusive verification to the oft- 
repeated charges of lUE leaders 
that the UE in the Chicago area 
has been completely under the 


heel of the Communist Party for 
many years. 

Lundgren declared flatly that 
“shortly after going to work as 
a field representative for the UE 
I was recruited into the Commu- 
nist Party by Pat Amato, presi- 
dent of Local 1150, UE." 

Lundgren pulled out of the 
Communist Party on Jan. 6 and 
on the following day submitted 
his resignation to the executive 
board of Local 1150, asserting 
that “the policies of the UE and 
the Communist Party are leading 
the workers down the drain." 

Krane blasted communist dom- 
ination of UE in a statement 
which charged that “the apparatus 
of the UE is controlled by the 
Communist Party in such a n\an- 
ner as to make it impossible for 
the UE membership to freely ex- 
ercise their fundamental right to 
run their own union in the way 
they best see fit." 

Despite assurances that he 
could be reelected business man- 
ager of the local again this year, 
Krane . decided not to be a can- 
didate. He explained: 

“The members of Local 1150 
have been wondering as to the 
manner in which the single slate 
of candidates in the current local 
election came to be selected. Their 
wonderment can be cleared up 
by stating that the slate had been 
determined in advance by the 
Communist Party and Ernest De- 
Maio (Distriqt 11 president), with- 
out any regard to the fundamen- 
tal right V of the membership of 
Local 1150 to determine who their 


Chicago, Illinois 
January, 6, 1950 


Illinois State ; C(snmunist FarT;y 
2u8 .N.;,;vtiie;il8 Street ■ , 

Chioa.go 6, Illinois 

Dear Sir: 

•Effeopive today, January 6, 1950 
I hereby resign from the Communist Party 


of America. 


Executive Board 
UE Local # 1150 
37 South Ashland Avenue 
Chicago 7, Illinois 

Dear Brothers & Sisters: 


Yours truly 


Lee Lundgren 


Effective today I hereby resigriA^ Field 

Representative of Local;# ll30 ^ibh I have held for 
the past four (U) years. 

Simultaneously I have sent, in my resignation to the 
Communist Party. 

I feel that ! can, no longer serve .in my capacity ^ 
a Field Representative' when I know that the 
of - the UE and the Communist Party are .leading the 
workers down the drain. ... , ■ , 

' ' Fraternally ..yours , ■ 


candidates for local officers 
should be. 

“On the 16th of December,” 
Krane continued, a private 

meeting held on the South Side 
at which somfe of the local candi- 
dates were present, it was re- 
ported by Sam Kushner, former 
business manager of Local 1119 
and at present full-time Commu- 
nist Party organizer, that Gil 
Green and other leaders of the 
Communist Party were opposed 
to my candidacy because of politi- 
cal differences. This meeting then 
proceeded tb determine the candi- 
dates for the forthcoming election 
in Local 1150." 

A1 Fineman, lUE-CIO field di- 
rector for District 11, said thalT 
the Krane and Lundgren resig- 
nations “more than vindicate the 
position adopted by the CIO in 
purging itself of the corrupt and 
Communist-dominated UE." 

Local 1150 represents more than 
5000 workers in 14 Chicago com- 
panies including . Sunbeam Corp., 
Wilco Instrument Co., Electric 
Storage Battery’s Exide division, 
G-M laboratories, General Trans- 
former, Jenson Radio Co, and 
Standard X-Ray Corp. 

While UE attorneys ranted at 
NLRB hearings in Dayton, Ohio; 
Pittsburgh, Pa., and New York 
City, UE top brass was dreaming 
up another method of slowing 
down “election death." 

The Dayton hearing on bargain- 
ing representation for 26,000 Gen- 
eral Motors electrical workers 
throughout the country slowly 
died after five days of UE delaying 
tkctics. 

The result: Attorneys for lUE- 
CIO, the company and UE are 
filing briefs which will be studied 
by the NLRB hearing officers. 
The decision they must reach is 
whether elections should be held 
in General Motors’ electrical di- 
visions. 

The Pittsburgh hearings, on the 
same issue, will determine the- 
fate of former UE members at 
Westinghouse Electric Corp. 

At these hearings UE Attorney 
David Scribner demanded that the 
board hold its hearings in eight 
different locations, at eight differ- 
ent times. The idea was to stall 
the elections for as long as pos- 
sible. 

The NLRB compromised by 
holding two sets of hearings, one 
in Pittsburgh, one in New York 
City. 

In New York City the case 
involved Local 450 at Sperry Gy- 
roscope Co. 

Here the UE attempted to prove 
that “UE was never expelled" 
from the CIO. No immediate end 
seemed in sight as the proceedings 
went into their third week with 
UE attorneys protesting every 
comma and undotted “i." 

The rear guard action of UE 
lawyers developed a new twist 
when UE Pres. Albert J. Fitz- 
gerald sent a letter to NLRB 
General Counsel Robert Deftham 
saying that UE wanted consent 
elections in the major electrical 
companies. 

James B. Carey, chairman of 
lUE’s Administrative Committee, 
in commenting on the consent 
elections, pointed out that “We 
are not unaware of the fact that 
UE cannot now participate in 
consent elections in most of the 
plants involved because . locals 
which they claim have been un- 
able to comply with the require- 
ments of the Taft-Hartley Act.*' 


8 


THE CIO NEWS, JANCABV 16, 1950 


N 



Early Senate Vote Seen On Middle-Ineome Housing 


C ONGRESS moved swiftly 
last week to bring Presi- 
dent Truman's middle-income 
housing bill up for a vote, 
while the real estate lobbyists, 
500 strong, swarmed into the 
capital to begin their 1950 
campaign against housing co- 
operatives and rent control. 

A Senate Banking and Currency 
sub-committee, headed by Sen. 
John J. Sparkman (D., Ala.), 
started hearings Jan. 12 on the 
Maybank amendment to the 
Sparkman billl, S. 2246, which al- 
ready is on the Senate calendar. 

The Maybank amendment pro- 
poses establishment of a National 
Mortgage Corporation for Housing 
Cooperatives, with initial capital 
of up to $100 million supplied by 
the government. The corporation 
wotild make* loans to '*middle- 
income” non-profit cooperatives 
and trusts, at a rate of interest 
approximating 2^/^%, repayable in 
up to 60 years. The money to make 
the . loans would come from sale 
of government-guaranteed bonds 
on the private investment market. 

A lready the proposition has 
been damned as ‘‘socialistic” 
by the real estate speculators, who 
see in it — correctly — a huge loss 
of profit to themselves, if adopted. 

Housing and Home Administra- 
tor Raymond Foley told the 
Senate group that adoption of the 
Maybank proposal would mean 
that families of moderate means, 
having incomes ^ranging from 
$2700 to $4400 a year, would be 
able to secure for about $65 ac- 
commodations equal to those for 
which they now>pay $90. He added 
that, in general, rents in the non- 
profit apartment projects would 
be about 25% below those in 
apartments now being built 
through other forms of federally- 
insured financing. 

The committee hopes to bring 
the proposal to the Senate 
floor by Jan. 20. ^Valter Reuther, 


chairman of the CIO Housing 
Committee, testifies Jan. 17. 

The real estate boys have 
adopted the line that the “middle- 
income” group is well supplied 
with housing, although President 
Truman and all governnmnt ex- 
perts state that families of moder- 
ate means are the “forgotten 
class” in the housing picture be- 
cause they are too well-off to be 
eligible for the low-cost projects 
and too poor to afford most 
privately-built dwellings. 

R ealty interests claim that 
because houses priced lower 
than $10,000 are being snapped 
up as fast as they come on the 
market, everyone is satified. 

Also there is on the part of the 
speculators a sudden pious belief 
in slum clearance. “We must see 
that 1950 becomes the year of 
neighborhood reclamation and 
slum avoidance,” said Robert P. 
Gerholtz of Flint, Mich., newly 


installed as president of the Na- 
tional Association of Real Estate 
Boards. “We must make a nation- 
wide frontal attack on slums ... 
Closely related to this program is 
the need for removal of war-time 
rent controls.” 

This was the keynote of the 
gathering of more than 500 real 
estate men, mostly presidents of 
local real estate boards, who met 
Jan. 11 in Washington's Hotel 
Statler to install Gerholtz and to 
hear an address by Rep. Ralph 
H. Gwinn (R., N. Y.), NAREB's 
chief spokesman in the House. 

(The chief specific proposal for slam 
clearance from the real estate lobby 
came from the Society of Industrial 
Realtors, who solemnly proposed that 
one way to take care of slums was to 
tear them down and put up factor- 
ies.) 

T he outgoing NAREB presi- 
dent told the gathering that 
“the voters are opposed to public 
housing.” In fact, he said, federal 


money for low-cost housing is 
getting the cold shoulder when- 
ever the voters get a chance to 
vote on it. He cited four examples 
where local referenda resulted in 
a turn-down of federal housing 
funds. He made no mention of the 
670 cities which have voted to 
accept, and use, federal money 
for low-cost housing. 

Foley told the Senate committee 
that “the cooperative principle is 
as old as America,” and said that 
“cooperative and non-profit hous- 
ing offer great promise of achiev- 
ing cost reductions because of 
savings immediately obtainable in 
operation and maintenance, and 
potentially in construction costs.” 

The committee shortly will re- 
ceive a cost breakdown of the 
average $12,000 house, which will 
s*how that the labor cost runs 
from $2000 to $2500, materials 
from $2700 to $4000, that the 
average price of the lot on which 
the house is built is $1000, and 


that the amount involved for 
taxes and management is from 
$4500 to $6300. These figures give 
some indications of why 500 red?l- 
tors should find it necessary to 
come to Washington in mid- 
January and give little dinners 
for Congressmen. 

Army Has New 
Racial Policy 

P RES. TRUMAN'S demand for 
racial equality in the armed 
forces has brought tentative 
adoption by the Army of a new 
policy providing for the integra- 
tion of Negroes throughout the 
service on a gradual, long-range 
basis. 

The plan would eventually end 
the traditional policy of strictly 
segregated units and result short- 
ly in the assignment of a limited 
number of highly qualified Negro 
soldiers to white outfits. 

They will be few in number and 
confined to “scarce specialists” for 
the time being. Existing separate 
white and Negro companies and 
battalions will continue generally 
segregated probably for years, 
an Army official said. 

Negro leaders, including George 
Weaver, chairman of the CIO's 
Committee to Abolish Discrimina- 
tion, hailed the proposal as the 
biggest ' step toward equality of 
opportunity and treatment by the 
Army to date. 

Weaver pointed out, however, 
that while the move will definitely 
be a step in the right direction, it 
will be some time before full 
benefits can be realized. 

The proposal will come before 
Pres. Truman's Committee on 
Equality of Treatment and Op- 
portunity in the Armed Services 
and concurrence is expected. 



Start ’50 Right, 
Give Buck To PAG 


CIO Group Tells Woods Decontrol 
Doubled Some Rents In Pa. Town 


THE REAL estate lobby has put out millions of 
■ sweet-scented words about how rents have not in- 
creased in decontrolled areas, but federal rent con- 
troller Tighe Woods on Jan. 11 for once heard the 
other side of the story. 

A CIO delegation from Northumberland County, 
Pa., met with Woods on Jan. 11 and told him, in 
simple language, what had happened in the little 
town of Shamokin, Pa., and adjoining county areas 
in the 10 days after rent controls were lifted on 
Woods’ order. 

IJEf^T CONTROLS were removed Jan. 1, on the 
recommendation of the local rent advisory board. 

It’s a small town, and it was easy for Amalgamated 
and Textile union representatives to make an ac- 
curate survey of what happened to their member- 
ships. The findings: 

Nearly every worker canvassed had been notified 


of a rent increase. The amount of the increase aver- 
aged 40% in all sections. Tenants of the lowest-rental 
housing, however, were asked to pay much higher 
increases, in many instances receiving notice that 
they would pay double their previous rental from 
now on, or find some place else to live. 

^NNE SPECIFIC example cited was that of a mar- 
ried worker who was promised a small apart- 
ment at $22 a month. Jan. 2 he was notified that the 
rent would be $40 a month and that, in addition, he 
would have to supply heat and light. 

The delegation told Woods that no new rental 
buildings had been erected recently and that occu- 
pancy was 100%, with a “shameful” amount of doubl- 
ing up of families. They also said that the landlords 
had made no repairs in recent years. 

.Woods indicated that he would recontrol the area 
if investigation substantiated the facts brought him 
by the CIO. 


New York 

T he new York State legis- 
lature, spurred by the 
‘‘grim comedy of errors" over 
rent control which has plagued 
New York City tenants for the 
past several months, may pass 
its own state rent control law 
and notify Housing Expediter 
Tighe Woods that the Empire 
State is getting out from under 
the Federal law entirely. 


State May 

Gov. Dewey recomonended Jan. 
11 that the State Temporary Rent 
Commission propose, for enact- 
ment at the present session of the 
State legislature, “fundamental 
legislation” on the entire subject 
of residential rent control. ^ 

The governor’s recommendation 
was made as he signed an emer- 
gency state law “validating” the 
New York City Sharkey law. 

Nobody knows whether the gov- 
ernor’s “validation” makes the 



Enact Own Rent Control Law 


city law valid or not, but it rep- 
resented a nice try on the part of 
the State Senate and Assembly to 
help New York tenants out of 
their predicament. 

THE SHARKEY law, which 
■ freezes city rents as of March 
1, 1949, and sets up a City Rent 
Commission with veto power over 
increases granted by federal rent 
control authorities, was passed by 
^the City Council after investiga- 
tion had discovered that the fed- 
eral authorities were granting in- 
creases averaging around 40%. 

Woods immediately contested 
the constitutionality of the city 
ordinance in federal and State 
Courts on the grounds that the 
city law was in conflict with the 
federal statute. The landlords also 
contested the law. The State Court 
of Appeals decided Woods and 
landlords were right. The state 
legislators hope they have undone 
the Court of Appeals decision. 
The federal court case is still 
Iiending. And the Sharkey law is 
due to expire May 1 anyway. 

The legal “snafu” has its comic 
side, but is nothing short of tragic 
for the tenants involved, since 
many thousands face actual evic- 
tion for refusal to pay federally 
granted increases because they be- 
lieved the Sharkey law valid, and 
many landlords are reporting hold- 
ing rental property off the market 
entirely in the overcrowded city 
while the dispute is setlted. The 
landlords, of course, hope that 
the federal law will die^ June 1. 


gECAUSE OF the uncertainty 
” over whether the federal stat- 
ute will be extended, and because 
of the great dissatisfaction in New 
York City over application of the 
federal law, the State Temporary 
Rent Commission is reported to 
be ready to “take time by the 
forelock” and recommend a state 
statute to take effect without de- 
lay. 

Meanwhile, Woods’ office in 
Washington got tough, under the 
federal statute, to the extent of 
issuing a ruling that New York 
landlords must re-decorate every 
two years, as was the custom 
wherv federal rent control first 


went into effect, and that refusal 
to do this and perform other usual 
services would constitute grounds 
for denial or revocation of in- 
creases. 

Next month. Woods plans to 
ask Congress for a $4 million “de- 
ficit appropriation” to carry on 
his activities until June 30, when 
the federal law expires. This is 
approximately half the difference 
between what he asked Congress 
to give him for the full fiscal year 
and what he got. The real estate 
lobby is hoping to kill rent con- 
trol early by persuading Congress 
not to give Woods any more 
money. 


Strike Paper Scoops Oldest 
Paper West Of Mississippi 

The youngest newspaper west of the Mississippi, a daily mimeo- 
graphed sheet put out by CIO Newspaper Guild members on strike at 
the Arkansas Gazette at Little Rock, recently “scooped” the Gazette, 
the oldest paper west of the Mississippi, in reporting a brutal murder. 

The regular newspaper, handicapped by the walkout of practically 
the entird editorial staff Dec. 17, completely missed the story of the 
murder of J. W. Brake, a Walker Creek community resident. 

According to police reports. Brake was killed during a drinking orgy 
with three companions during the night of Dec. 4. His body was tossed 
into a stream, where it was found Dec. 29. 

The finding of the body put an end to the 24-day intensive search 
through the South Arkansas swamplands. 

The Guildsmen struck when the owners of the Gazette objected to 
the inclusion of the clause, “no employe shall be discharged except for 
just and sufficient reason.” 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1950 


9 




CIO BREWERY WORKERS officials (above) are on their way 
to a Senate committee hearing where their state councils^ co- 
ordinator, Joseph Brady, testified against S. 1847, a bill to 
prohibit liquor advertising in interstate commerce. Frank Fem- 
bach of the CIO also testified against the measure. 


Wood Union To Seek 

Soeial Benefits 

/ 


A social benefits program 
will top the list of de-' 
mands made by the CIO Wood- 
workers on lumber operators 
in five Northwestern states 
this spring. 

Pres. James A. Fadling said the 
union will seek an industrywide 
health and welfare employer- 
paid program which would give 
each employe coverage for life 
insurance; full hospital, medical 
and surgical coverage; payment 
of sick benefits amounting to $40 
per week; and asking that work- 
ers drawing state compensation 
be given a sum equivalent to the 
difference between workmen’s 
compensation and $40 per week. 

The union also will seek holiday 
pay improvements. 


IIVHESE DEMANDS,^ Fadling 
* said, “can be granted by any 
tpye of employer in the industry 
whether it be large or small ope- 
rations, long-term or short-term 
operations. 

“These points are necessary to 
maintain buying power and the 
employers can well afford the cost 
of this program even at the pres- 
ent price of lumber.” 

“The market is firm, orders are 
high, and building permits already 
issued point to a prosperous 1950,” 
Union Research Dir. Virgil Burtz 
said. 

Negotiations, which will start 
in February, affect slightly more 
than 50,000 workers and 675 com- 
panies in the five Pacific North- 
west states. 


Three Senators Stymie 
^Labor Monopoly’ Report 


D espite reports in the 

daily press implying that the 
Senate Banking Committee had 
unanimously urged application of 
the anti-trust laws to labor un- 
ions, this version of the latest at- 
tack on organized labor has blown 
up in the face of its sponsor. Sen. 
Willis Robertson (D., Va.). 

Three Senators, at a closed ses- 
sion of the Banking Committee 
Jan. 12, obtained unanimous ap- 
proval for the addition, at the end 
of Robertson’s anti-union report, 
of a statement indicating they 
were only willing to pass on the 
report to the Judiciary Commit- 
tee, without recommendation. 
They denied press reports that 
they approved Robertson’s ideas 
about using the anti-monopoly 
laws against organized labor. 
Senators Paul Douglas (D., 111.), 

10 


Glen Taylor (D., Idaho) and John 
Sparkham (D., Ala.) were the 
three who wanted to make their 
position clear. 

At present the long, rambling 
report by Robertson on an inves- 
tigation of the United Mine 
Workers and the three-day week 
in the coal industry last summer, 
is in the hands of the conserva- 
tive Judiciary Committee. 

Minutes of the Banking Com- 
mittee Jan. 12 also confirm LPA’s 
earlier report that Robertson had 
prepared a specific bill on which 
he wanted the committee’s im- 
plied approval before the shift 
to the Judiciary Committee, un- 
der whose jurisdiction the anti- 
trust laws come. This bill was 
cut out of the report before it 
was approved for transmission to 
Judiciary. (LPA.) 


RUSS PRlESTLty 

‘‘Brother, that’s traveling!— New York to Chicago <mi only four 
cups of coffee.” 


Republican Sustained 
In Election Dispnte 


I N ViHAT the minority called 
‘'a gross reflection on the 
integrity and honesty of the 
House of Representatives,” a 
House Administration subcom- 
mittee has voted five to two 
to sustain the seating of Re- 
publican William W. Blackney, 
of Flint, Mich., over George 
Stevens, labor-backed Demo- 
crat who demanded a recount 
of the ballots. 

Blackney apparently won by 
784 votes out of 146,000 votes cast 
in November 1948, but Stevens 
charged grave irregularities in 
the count and appealed to the 
House committee for the oppor- 
tunity to check the ballots. 

Only two members of the sub- 
committee were for giving 
Stevens the chance for a recount 
—Reps. Anthony Cavalcante (D., 
Pa.) and Wayne Hays (D., Ohio). 


Against Stevens were: Reps. Burr 
P. Harrison (D., Va.), Omar 

Burleson (D., Tex.), Chase Goiiig 
Woodhouse (D., Conn.), Benjamin 
F. James (R., Pa.), and Karl Le- 
Compte (R., Iowa). 

Cavalcante said he and Hays 
would prepare a minority report 
for the full committee, and if 
they lost they would . carry 
Stevens’ case to the floor of the 
House. He said the evidence pre- 
sented showed “definite corrup- 
tion and subvention of the Consti- 
tution and the federal status and 
the precedents of the House.^’ 

Hays added that “this man 
Stevens was denied what is the 
fundamental right of a candidate 
in Ohio — to look at the ballots. 
He was denied that by a federal 
court injunction which was dis- 
missed, and by a letter from 
the chairman of this subcommit- 
tee. I don’t know who got the 
most votes, but Stevens should 
get a look at the ballots.” 


House Unit Plans Sessions 
On Several Welfare Bills 


yHE EOOJAM of welfare and 
■ labor legislation that’s been 
piling up in the House Labor 
Committee is broken, union 
spokesmen ho-pe. Chairman John 
Lesinski (D., Mich.) announced 
Jan. 9 a schedule of closed com- 
mittee sessions to reach final de- 
cisions on such key bills as federal 
aid to education and the labor 
extension program measure. 

A bill appropriating $300 mil- 
lion for federal aid to schools has 
already passed the Senate, and 
the subject will be taken up by 
the House committee Feb. 6. Ses- 
sions will continue until a satis- 
factory bill is completed. Lesinski 
told reporters the measure should 
be ready for the floor by early 
March. 


Here is the. rest of the schedule: 

Bills on aid to the physically 
handicapped, and amendments to 
the vocational rehabilitation act 
will be worked on during the 
week of Jan. 16. The labor exten- 
sion program will come up the 
week of Jan. 23. Welfare of coal 
miners, public library demonstra- 
tion service, and community rec- 
reation program bills will be 
taken up the week of Jan. 30. 

After federal aid to education, 
tentatively scheduled for March 6, 
the Labor Committee will pass 
on a bill to provide for federal 
funds for education of children 
in areas with schools congested 
because of new federal activities 
— like Oak Ridge, Tenn., and Han- 
ford, Wash, 


GOP ‘Uncovers’ 
Demo ‘Plot’ 

Republicans in the Massa- 
chusetts House of Representa- 
tives have discovered what they 
claim is a Democratic plot to 
discredit them in the eyes of the 
Bay State unions. 

When the legislators received 
their new official stationery, they 
discovered that the union label 
had been left off the GOP letter- 
head, but was included promi- 
nently on the Democrats’ sta- 
tionery. 

The Democrats said it was 
just a printer’s error — “or maybe 
the printers’ political wisdom.” 

$1 Billion 
Paid Jobless 
Last Year 

I NDUSTRIAL layoffs shot up 
during the first seven 
months of 1949, causing a rec- 
ord-breaking volume of dis- 
bursements in unemployment 
insurance to jobless workers 
last year. 

The U. S. Labor Dept.’s Bureau 
of Employment Security last 
week announced that more than 
$1 billion was paid out by state 
agencies to some 7^ million un- 
employed workers in 1949. In 
1948, payments totaled $790 mil- 
lion. 

Robert C. Goodwin, director of 
the bureau, said that while the 
high rate of benefit disbursements 
reduced reserve funds built up 
for such emergencies, the pay- 
ments had been easily financed, 
and with the exception of one or 
two states, trust fund reserves 
were sufficient to finance the pay- 
ment of benefits even if employ- 
ment should drop sharply from 
its current level. 

(In a number of states, unem- 
ployed workers .have used- up all 
the benefits to which they are en- 
titled. Demands for extending the 
period for paying benefits are in- 
creasing.) 

“State unemployment taxes 
amounting to slightly less than 
$1 billion were collected during 
the year,” Goodwin reported. “For 
every dollar of taxes collected 
during the year, about $1.75 was 
paid out in benefits. The excess 
of payments to unemployed cov- 
ered workers reduced aggregate 
reserves in the Federal Unem- 
ployment Trust Fund by less than 
S%. 

“The balance in the Trust Fund 
at the year’s end was about $7 
billion as compared with $7,600,- 
000,000 at the close of 1948.” 

Goodwin said the average week- 
ly payment for total unemploy- 
ment which fluctuated around $20 
during the first half of the year, 
rose gradually to about $21 dur- 
ing the last three months. 

The employment security sys- 
tem could have been more effec- 
tive in combating the effects of 
unemployment, he said, had it 
not been for the wide variation 
between states in the amount of 
weekly benefits paid eligible job- 
less workers and in the duration 
of benefits. 

Textile Worker 
Pensions Inevitable 

Inevitably, textile workers are 
going to gfi.t pensions, Secy.-Treas. 
William Pollock of the CIO Tex- 
tile Workers told 790 members 
of the union’s joint board at Law- 
rence, Mass. If employers refuse, 
the union will develop its own 
type of pension system and bar- 
gain for that type, he said. 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1950 


N 



W!W 

Fitzpatrick in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch 

THE MESSAGE 

AMA Moves ^Further 
And Further To Right ’ 


More Funds 
Asked For 
Labor Dept. 

F unds for the Labor Dept., 
severely cut in recent 
years, would be about $50 
million higher in the 12 
months starting July 1, 1950,. 
if President Truman’s budget 
proposals are put into effect. 
Truman asks $252 million for 
the department. 

A House Appropriations sub- 
committee starts work immedi- 
ately on the Labor Pept. fund 
measure, with orders from Chair- 
man Clarence Cannon (D, Mo.) 
to complete work by Feb. 3. 
Hearings are by law secret, 
though the record is made public 
when the subcommittee turns in 
its version. 

Extension and improvement of 
the unemployment insurance pro- 
gram accounts for the bulk of 
the increase in funds — about $33 
million to cover the states’ costs 
resulting from increasing unem- 
ployment — and another $26 mil- 
lion proposed to cover first year’s 
cost of the enlarged unemploy- 
ment insurance program planned 
in the House-approved social se- 
curity bill now before the Senate. 

^RANGES IN the Wage-Hour 
law, requiring government 
lawyers to go into the courts to 
obtain interpretations of some of 
Congress’s working, and an in- 
creased enforcement staff for the 
wage-hour work, will result in 
added spending of $4 million over 
last year. 

Smaller sums will go for these 
new or special projects in the 
Department: 

A study of whether the 75c 
minimum wage really will result, 
as its foes claim, in closing of 
industrial plants, and cutting out 
jobs for marginal workers. A 
three-year study of this, and re- 
lated problems of coverage and 
exemptions from the Fair Labor 
Standards Act, is proposed by 
President Truman for the Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics. 

Continuation of the big over- 
haul of the ‘’cost of living” index 
is indorsed in Truman’s pro- 
posals. 

Enlargement of the interna- 
tional labor affairs activities, in- 
cluding the program of educat- 
ing German trade unionists, is 
planned. 

The Women’s Bureau would 
again be able to have a small 
field staff, jobs which have been 
cut out by Congress despite re- 
peated requests from the Presi- 
dent and unionists in the past 
few years. (LPA) 

C. of C. Head Calls 
For ^Reorganization’ 

Herman W. Steinkraus, presi- 
dent of the U. S. Chamber of 
Commerce, wants the Department 
of Labor reorganized into a new 
Department of Labor and Indus- 
try, or Department of Labor and 
Management. He says the situa- 
tion has changed completely 
since the Department was formed 
in 1913. Then, he told the Pitts- 
burgh Chamber of Commerce, the 
Department was “to further the 
interest of labor, and nobody 
else,” but now “labor has grown 
into great strength, and the situ- 
ation has changed completely.” 

He called for “economy,” and a 
balanced budget, charged big in- 
dustry was being attacked merely 
for bigness, asked for an end of 
“threats” by the government, and 
a “fair chance” for the Taft- 
Hartley law, which he said most 
workers favor. 


O NE STEP forward, two 
steps back, seems to be 
the system followed by the 
Amel'ican Medical Association 
in its legislative program. 

An examination of the position 
taken by the AMA in recent years 
on various health bills, made by 
the Committee for the Nation’s 
llealth, as reported in its latest 
bulletin, shows these instances of 
forward-backward movement : 

Last year the AMA refrained 
from opposing legislation to use 
Federal funds to aid professional 
schools and to train more doctors 
and personnel. 

AMA authorities now declare 
the measure grants federal offi- 
cials *^too much potential au- 
thority to interfer in the internal 
administration of the medical 
schools/* 

A resolution passed by the 
AMA's House of Delegates at a 
special meeting in September 1938 
“unreservedly” s u p„p o r t e d dis- 
ability insurance as tending to 
reduce permanent disability. 

In igjfO the AMA reversed its 
approval by objecting to a section 
on compulsory contribiUory per- 
manent and total disability insur- 
ance included in bill HR 6000 
passed by the House. 

“The program proposed in HR 
6000,” said the AMA board of 
trustees, “will adversely influence 
the patient’s desire for recovery. 
Initiation of a compulsory federal 
disability program would repre- 
sent another step toward national- 
ization of medical care and social- 
ization of the practice of medi- 
cine.” 

Last year a joint group of AMA, 
union and cooperative representa- 
tives worked out 20 principles or 
standards to which such plans 
should conform to merit profes- 
sional approval. 

Now the AMA has cut the heart 
out of the plan to assist the or- 
ganization of voluntary insurance 
plans sponsored by unions, coop- 
eratives and other lay “coitsumer** 
bodies. It has adopted a report 
requiring that: 

The State or County Medical 
Society must indorse the plan be- 


fore it will be considered for ap- 
proval by the AMA. This means 
that the decision rests with 
County and! State Medical So- 
cieties which have a consistent 
record of trying to block con- 
sumer-sponsored plans. 

The plan must be considered 
**on the basis of past perform- 
ances, not on the basis of con- 
templated performance.** In other 
words, no new plan can get ap- 
proval. 

The Committee for the Nation’s 
Health believes that the AMA’s 
reversals from even such timid 
forward steps as it took in the 
past are based “on political and 
economic prejudice, not medical 
grounds,” and can best be under- 
stood “as a tactical shift dictated 
by its opposition to national 
health insurance.” 

The AMA, it says, “now seems 
to be weighing every proposal in 
terms of defending the status quo 
in medical economics. Considera- 
tion of human needs, of training 
more doctors, increasing facilities, 
extending preventive care, elim- 
inating the dollar barrier — none 
of these determines^ AMA legis- 
lative policy. 

IIVHE OVERRIDING factors 
■ seem to be the potential ef- 
fect of each measure on National 
Health Insurance, and on the con- 
trol which organized medicine 
wants to exert over every phase 
of medical care. To conduct this 
campaign without compromise, 
the AMA hierarchy is forced 
further to the right in search of 
support. 

“Conversely, its defense of the 
status quo seems to be forcing 
it into sharper political attacks 
against liberal programs. To, hold 
its own Maginot line, it must ally 
itself with other conservative 
groups, including reactionary ele- 
ments in the Democratic and Re- 
publican parties. 

“The militant right-wing atti- 
tude of the AMA, as revealed at 
the December meeting, may mean 
that it will use its war chosts to 
oppose liberal programs in any 
field where the AMA sees* ‘serious 
medical implication.’ ” 


N. Y. State PAG Gets 
Ready For Elections 


T he recent attack by 
Gov. Thomas E. Dewey of 
New York on proposed na- 
tional health insurance drew 
the rejoinder from Pres. Louis 
Hollander of the New York 
State CIO that the voters in 
1950 will be offered a clear-cut 
choice this year between the 
‘'welfare state” and the “spe- 
cial interest state.” 

Hollander spoke at a statewide 
PAC conference at Syracuse when 
100 delegates made plans for set- 
ting in motion the* CIO-PAC pro- 
gram for state and congressional 
elections. 

Listing health insurance and 
old-age security as key goals of 
the CIO, Hollander compared 
those who cry “socialism” at 
such proposals to those early cri- 
tics of such measures as free pub- 
lic education, unemployment in- 
surance and public housing. 

“Doctor Dewey says that every- 
body is doing fine and that there 
is room for all in our charity 
clinics,” Hollander commented. 

H e charged that the mem- 
bers of the Legislature ap- 
pointed by the governor to study 


the problems of the aged were in 
grave danger of reaching retire- 
ment age themselves before they 
come up with a solution to the 
problem. 

He challenged Dewey or any 
other latter-day opponent of the 
“welfare state” to come out 
against public education now or 
to advocate abandonment of any 
of the developments of the “wel- 
fare state” in such fields as police 
and fire protection, water supply 
and sanitation. 

R ep. franklin D. Roosevelt 
Jr. and Paul E. Fitzpatrick, 
New York State Democratic chair- 
man, addressed the meeting. Both 
have been mentioned as possible 
Democratic nominees for Governor. 

Roosevelt praised the political 
unity which he said, “made possi- 
ble the recent election victories of 
U. S. Senator Herbert H. Lehman 
and N* Y. Mayor W^illiany O’Dwyer.” 

Roosevelt received a rising ova- 
tion when he called for the re- 
placement of the present Dewey 
administration by one devoted to 
the general welfare. 

Hollander indicated that the in- 
vitation extended to Roosevelt 
and Fitzpatrick to speak at the 
meeting did not constitute an in- 
dorsement of either for Governor, 


Pure Oil Co. Is Warned 
Of Anti-Union Attitude 


A pparently 22 strikes in 10 
years against the Pure Oil Co. 
by the CIO Oil Workers Inti. Un- 
ion have failed to teach that com- 
pany the error of its ways. 

The Pure Oil Nation Wide 
Council of OWIU-CIO in a recent 
session at St. Louis, Mo., charged 
a renewal of unfair labor at- 
titudes and actions by this com- 
pany — just two years after com- 
pany officials had promised — at 
the end of a 10-month-long strike 
—to quit trying to bust the union. 

For many years Pure was 
known as the “sore thumb” of the 
oil industry. Every time OWIU at- 
tempted to organize Pure em- 
ployes or negotiate a Pure con- 
tract, the company countered with 
discharges, intimidation and re- 
fusal to bargain. 

A S A RESULT, various OWIU 
locals staged a total of 22 
strikes against Pure between 1938 
and early 1948. 

Climax of these strikes was a 
10-month shutdown of the big 
Pure refinery in Toledo, Ohio. 
During this strike, not a single 
scab entered the plant, not a 
barrel of oil .was refined. At its 
conclusion, the union settled for 


Health Insurance 
Poster Available 

A big four-color poster show- 
ing how national health insur- 
ance would help the whole fam- 
ily is now available at CIO head- 
quarters in Washington. 

This striking picture strip tell- 
ing at a glance the story of what 
such legislation would mean to 
Joe Worker, his wife and chil- 
dren, should be' pinned on union 
halls all over '^the country. 

The words “Don’t let the 
$3,000,000 AMA Lobby cheat 
you out of a healthy life,” jump 
out at you on the poster. 

Copies may be ordered from 
the CIO Dept, of Research & 
Education, 718 Jackson PL, N.W., 
Washington 6, D. C.; price, 25c 
each, 10 for $1, 100 for $8. 


a better deal than it originally 
struck for and company officials 
said, in effect: 

“We’ve had enough. From now 
on we’re going to grant that the 
union is here to stay and we’U 
do nothing to hinder it.”. 

But in recent organizing efforts 
among Pure employes in the pro- 
duction fields of Southern Illinois, 
OWIU has encountered a renewal 
of the old Pure unfair attitude. 

And the Pure Oil Nation Wide 
Council of OWIU, representing a 
heavy majority of Pure employes 
throughout the nation, has warned 
the Pure management that if the 
company wants another fight, 
they’ll get it. 

ACW Wins Court 
Action On Picketing 

T he APPEULATE Division 
the New York Supreme Court 
on Jan. 10 upheld the right of the 
CIO Clothing Workers to picket 
the stores of the Sa-Ray Clothing 
Co., Inc., for selling clothing made 
by a non-union manufacturer. 

The appellate court rejected an 
appeal by the company from the 
decision of a lower New York 
court which refused to issue an 
injunction to stop picketing of 
two of the firm’s stores, one in 
Manhattan and the other in 
Brooklyn. 

On Nov. 29, the National Labor 
Relations Board'^similarly rejected 
an appeal by Sa^Ray in which the 
firm sought to invoke Taft-Hartley 
to prevent picketing of its stores. 

Prisoners Of War 
May File Claims 

Former Anierican prisoners of 
war and civilian internees of 
World War II may now file 
.claims for compensation. Daniel 
F. Cleary, chairman of the War 
Claims Commission, announced. 
Forms may be secured from state 
veterans’ departments or other 
designated state agencies, from 
the regional Veterans’ Adminis^- 
tration offices or from the Com- 
mission’s offices in Washington. 


H 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1950 


Oleo Tax Repealer Near Vote In 


By HENRY C. FLEISHER 

C ONGRESS last week di- 
gested three important 
economic messages from the 
President and got down to 
talking about the federal tax 
on oleomargarine. 

The tax is 10c a pound on yel- 
low-colored oleo. Few people 
want to pay out the extra dime; 
instead they exercise their fingers 
by laboriously equeezing dabs of 
color through the uncolored prod- 
uct. 

The tax doesn’t bring much rev- 
enue to Uncle Sam. It was adopt- 
ed years ago — together with a 
ohe-half-cent tax on white oleo 
and expensive license fees for 
manufacturers and distributors — 
as a means of discouraging mar- 
garine-eating in place of butter- 
eating. 

The tax repeal bill passed the 
House last year, and is now near- 
ing a vote in the Senate. The 
CIO, appearing at 1949 hearings, 
strongly supported repeal of the 
tax as an aid and convenience to 
consumers. 

But the Senate debate has been 
largely a fight between two 
groups of agricultural producers 
— the dairy interests, which favor 
butter, and the cotton interests. 


whose oil products go into oleo- 
margarine'. The dairy groups want 
to keep the tax. 

Don Montgomery, legislative 
representative of the CIO Auto 
Workers, pointed out last year, 
with some convincing economic 
material, that no real harm would 
be done to the dairy interests by 
repeal of the tax. 

Montgomery— a former Dept, of 
Agriculture consumer expert — 
showed that increasing demands 
for dairy products assure a mar- 
ket for milk producers. Removal 
of the tax on margarine, both 
colored and white, would make 
the product more readily avail- 
able to low-income consumers, 
Montgomery said, while dairy 
farrhers would continue to get 
income from their milk products. 

It appears that the oleo tax 
issue will soon be voted upon. 
But Sen. Danger (R., N. D.), rep- 
resenting a state with a heavy 
cow population, threw three civil 
rights amendments onto the oleo 
tax repeal bill, in the obvious 
hope of working up opposition 
from southern Senators. 

Sen. Lucas. (D. 111.), majority 
leader in the Senate, voiced hope, 
however, that the three amend- 
inents would be tabled — and that 
the unfettered oleo tax repeal 
bill would pass. 

M ore solid action on civil 
rights is due in the House. 
Rep. Adolph Sabath (D., 111.), 
63-year-old head of the House 
Pules Committee, said that pow- 
erful group would start immedi- 
jPkte hearings on the FEPC anti- 
ffiscrimination bill. Sabath, a vet- 
iet'an liberal, predicted House pass- 
jlge of the measure. , 

^*Both parties have said they 
|U*e for it, so they are pledged 
support the bill," Sabath de- 
clared. He added that Republicans 
^ave told the country they are 


for the FEPC, and now I’m going 
to put them on record.’’ 

The FEPC bill has been re- 
ferred, without recommendation, 
to the Rules Committee by the 
House Labor Committee. It prob- 
ably stands an easier chance of 
passage in the House than in 
the Senate. 

The upper body last year adopt- 
ed rules proposed by the Repub- 
lican leadership — acting in close 
cooperation with the Dixiecrat 
bloc — that make ending of fili- 
busters more difficult than ever 
before. And FEPC is almost cer- 
tain to produce a filibuster in 
the Senate. 

S OCIAL SECURITY improve- 
ments, already passed by the 
House, are coming up for study 
in the Senate Finance Committee. 
That group scheduled hearings, 
with government security experts 
among the first witnesses. Both 
CIO and AFL unions will testify 
during coming weeks. 

The House bill increased cover- 
age by several millions, and pro- 
vided for raises up to about 70% 
in the amount of old age social 
security benefits. 

CIO hailed passage of the House 
bill last year as an important 
step forward. But because Con- 
gress has delayed so many years 
in modernizing social security, 
CIO officials pointed out that even 
greater improvements in coverage 
and benefits are needed now. 

L egislation to liberalize the 
1948 Displaced Persons Act 
is another early arising issue in 
the Senate — but there were signs 
that Sen. Pat McCarran (D., Nev.), 
who stalled on action all last 


year, niay be resuming his stalling 
opposition to the bill. 

McCarran heads the Senate Ju- 
diciary Committee, and he kept 
that group sitting on the House- 
passed bill most of last session. 
The bill would increase the num- 
ber of displaced persons allowed 
into the country, and would re- 
move eligibility provisions that 
have been attacked as biased. 

The Senate — late in the session, 
when many members had gone 
home — referred the bill back to 
the committee with direct^es that 
it be reconsidered and reported 
back by Jan. 25. 


McCarran professed to reporters 
that he didn’t know of any "dead- 
line"; and, still acting the dead- 
pan role, complained that it’s 
often "hard to get the boys to- 
gether" on the Judiciary Commit- 
tee for action. 

Reporters didn’t take the Ne- 
vada Senator’s comments too se- 
riously — except to judge that more 
delay on DP’s is probably in the 
cards. 

Meanwhile, Ugo Carusi, a mem- 
ber of the government’s Displaced 
Persons Commission, bitterly crit- 
icized a "report" made public by 
Sen. McCarran which purported 


THE CIO NEWS 
1949 VOTING RECORD 

This special 8-page supplement is being printed as a 
separate CIO publication, for distribution among union 
members throughout the country. 

T 

Prices for the 1949 Voting IJ^ecord: 

5c a copy; 50 for $2.00; 100 for $3.50 
500 for $14; 1,000 for $20 

Send your orders for the 1949 Voting Record (CIO Pub- 
lication No. 179), together with check or money order, 

to: 

Publications Department 
Congress of Industrial Organizations 
718 Jackson Place N. Y. 

Washington 6, D. C. 


Steel Industry Rapped For Price Increase 
By Truman^ s Council Of Economic Advisers' 


Steel Price Probe 
Hearings Jan. 24 

Hearings on the recent steel 
price boost will open Jan. 24 be- 
fore the Joint Congressional 
Committee on the Economic Re- 
port, Chairman Joseph C. O’Ma- 
honey (D. Wyo.) has announced. 

The Wyoming Senator de- 
nounced the steel price increase 
as a "tax upon the whole econ- 
omy of the U.S." at a time when 
the steel companies "are enjoy- 
ing extraordinary profits exceed- 
ing even those of the record 
year of 1948." 


learned to master a recession 
without going into a depression. 

C REDIT, Council added, should 
go to business, labor, and 
government. The economic meas- 
ures enacted under the New Deal 
to provide cushions for the econ- 
omy were government’s contribu- 
tion to the handling of the 1949 
crisis, the report said, concluding 
that "we are learning how to use 
our intelligence to accomplish all 
that our resources permit.” 

In another chapter, the Coun- 
cil stressed the importance of 
wage increases to keep the econ- 
omy in balance. It said the only 
way to translate a growing po- 


B USINESS generally was given 
a pat on the back by President 
Truman's Council of Economic 
Advisers, in its annual report to 
the President, but the steel in- 
dustry was singled out for sharp 
rebuke for its recent $4 per ton 
price increase on basic steel. 

The Council reported inflation 
is no longer a threat, but price 
increases were serious because 
they tended to spiral and to re- 
tard consumption, which must be 
expanded if full recovery from 
last year’s recession is to be 
achieved. 

"If there is any room for price 
change in some vital industrial 
areas," the Council said, "it is 
downward and not in an upward 
direction. Earnings are general- 
ly rewarding, though not so high 
as a year ago, and they can best 
be protected and advanced by 
those policies which will main- 
tain and expand volume. 

"Steel prices are a case ‘ in 
point. Some reduction in steel 
prices would favorably influence 
the whole economic situation. 
Some of these other products, 
whose prices are affected by 
steel prices are also priced at a 
level where sustained and grow- 
ing output seems uncertain at 
current prices. 

‘^HE STATEMENTS of the 
■ steel industry accompanying 
the recent price increases did not 
in our judgment impair the short- 
ly prior .findings of the Steel In- 
dustry Board. These findings 
were to the effect that the situa- 
tion in the industry, allowing for 
pensions, did not justify price in- 
creases and in fact left room for 


price decreases in view of no 
wage-rate increases." 

Continuing, the Economic 
Council warned business execu- 
tives not to wait for tax cuts. 
"Changes in tax rates can, at 
most, be only small under present 
circumstances," the Council said. 
"The possibilities for increase in 
consumption are large. 

"We shall not be completely out 
of the woods after our recent dif- 
ficulties," the Council added, "un- 
til private adjustments and pub- 
lic policies are successful in rais- 
ing the. level of consumption, 
which is not now sufficiently high 
for sustained maximum produc- 
tion and employment or for the 
full prosperity of our business 
system." 

This discussion of prices came 
in one of the most interesting 
chapters of the report — entitled 
"The Significance of 1949 and the 
Economic Outlook." The signifi- 
cance of 1949, the Council said, 
was the proof that we have 


tential for national output into 
actuality "is to distribute more 
goods. If the price level is rea- 
sonably stable, then the increas- 
ing purchasing power necessary 
for expanding markets must come 
mainly in the form of money in- 
comes rising in accord with im- 
proved productivity. 

"And since wages constitute the 
bulk of personal income, the 
soundest general formula, once 
wages, prices, and profits are in 
a workable relationship, is for 
money wages to increase with 
productivity trends in the whole 
economy." 

This call for higher wages 
marked a sharp break with the 
policies of the Economic Council 
under Edwin Nourse, former 
chairman. Nourse felt increased 
productivity should be reflected 
in lower *prices, rather than wage 
increases — a position which labor 
contended was unworkable be- 
cause prices rarely go down ex- 
cept in bad times. (LPA). 


12 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1950 


N 


Senate 


to show that large numbers of 
subversives are entering the coun- 
try under the present law. 

Carusi described testimony tak- 
en in Europe last, summer by 
McCarran as "a hodge-podge of 
untruths, half-truths and simple 
lies." 

McCarran made a short trans- 
Atlantic visit in 1949, paid his re- 
spects to Spanish dictator Franco, 
and came home with a set of 
"facts" about displaced persons 
which have been refuted as com- 
pletely in error. 

‘CzaP Tide 
Is Shunned 
By Denham 

pOBERT N.- DENHAM, general 
counsel of the Nat’l Labor 
Relations Board, doesn’t really 
want to be a Czar. He said so 
openly at the January meeting 
of the Bar Ass’n of the District 
of Columbia. 

It’s Denham’s responsibility un- 
der the Taft-Hartley act to pass 
on charges of unfair labor prac- 
tice, whether the complaint is 
filed by a union or by a company. 
If he says "yes," his opinion is 
subject to review by the NLRB 
and federal courts. But if he 
says "no," there’s an end to the 
matter. That’s one reason he's 
tagged Czar. 

However, in respon.se to a di- 
rect question, he confessed his 
"no" decisions should be subject 
to review. "You’d be in court all 
the time," snapped Thomas L. 
Harris, assistant general counsel 
of the CIO. Herbert Thatcher, 
AFL general counsel, smiled in 
agreement with Harris. 

Denham, in an informal debate, 
was defending the positive side of 
the question: "Has the Taft-Hart- 
ley act operated to benefit Amer- 
ican labor ?" His partner was 
John Gall, general counsel for the 
Southern Coal Producers. For 
the negative side, and taking it 
strongly, were Thatcher and Har- 
ris. 

Gall was the attorney who filed 
the first of the recent briefs 
charging that John L. Lewis and 
the United Mine Workers were 
committing an unfair labor prac- 
tice by working a three-day week. 
Denham had not yet ruled on 
these charges, and many observ- 
ers including a UMW spokesman 
questioned the propriety of his 
sitting as partner in public de- 
bate with an attorney for. one 
party in a highly controversial 
case still to be decided, even 
though he managed to avoid say- 
ing anything about coal. 

The debate, which was chaired 
by Theodore Granik of the Amer- 
ican Forum of the Air, was re- 
corded for broadcasting Jan. 15 
(LPA.) 

^Fact’ Board Named 
In N. Y, City Dispute 

Mayor O’Dwyer staved off a 
labor crisis on New York’s 
sprawling subway system by nam- 
ing a four-man board of fact- 
finders to survey the demands of 
the 40,000 employes and make rec- 
ommendations. Most of the sub- 
way employes belong to the CIO 
Transport Workers Union. Bal- 
ance belong to a variety of AFL 
and inde^pendent unions. 

Factfinder chairman will be 
David L. Cole, who served last 
year on the board that recom- 
mended company-paid pensions in 
steel. Wages, hours and griev- 
ance procedures are at issue. 











THE CIVIL RIGHTS issue erupted when the House Rules Com- 
mittee staged a power-grab to prevent action on FEPC and other 
Fair Deal legislation, just as more than 4000 delegates to the Na- 
tional Emergency Civil Rights Mobilization came to town. Top: 


Reps. Mansfield (D., Mont.), Granger (D., Utah), Eberharter (D., 
Pa.), Holifield (D., Cal.) and Carroll (D., Colo.) confer on how to 
beat the Rules Committee. Bottom: Civil Rights Mobilizers from 
Michigan’s 13th district head for the Capitol. (See story on p. 7). 





Walter Reuther: 




Lobby Favors Profitable ’ Co-op Housing 


pRES. WALTER P. Reutber, 
of the Auto Workers, chair- 
man of the CIO Housing Com- 
mittee, ripped into the real 
estate lobby on Jan. 18 as the 
Senate Banking and Currency 
Committee prepared to vote 
on the Maybank amendment 
to the “middle-income” hous- 
ing bill. 

The amendment would establish 
a government corporation em- 
powered to sell debentures on the 
investment market and, with the 
proceeds, make long-term, low- 
interest loans to genuine housing 
cooperatives and non-profit trusts. 

Reuther told a sub-committee 
headed by Sen. John J. Sparkman 
(D., Ala.) that the real estate in- 
terests, now screaming “socialism” 
at this proposal, had favored the 
principle of co-operative housing 
over many years. He quoted- pre- 
vious testimony by landlords’ 
lobbyists to support his conten- 
tion. 

“They don’t realy object to the 


cooperative principle,*' Reuther 
said, “as long as the government 
makes it possible for speculators 
to help themselves. What they 
object to is^ legislation such as 
this, which makes it possible for 
home qwners to help themselves.” 

R euther revealed that on Feb. 

2, 1949, he had received a 
letter from Herbert U. Nelson, 
executive vice president of the 
National Association of Real Es- 
tate Boards, soliciting the CIO’s 
help in promoting co-operative 
housing for middle-income fami- 
lies. 

The letter was followed by a 
joint meeting, he continued, after 
which Nelson sent the CIO Com- 
mittee a memorandum stating in 
part that the idea of government 
loans to co-operatives was “worthy 
of legislative action.” 

Sparkman interjected that the 
NAREB, which is on record as 
opposing the pending amendment, 
was at the same time promoting 
a proposal which would have the 
government take up second mort- 


gages on cooperatives, through 
the Reconstruction Finance Corp. 

“The NAREB is favoring this 
scheme, which would cost the 
government more money than the 
Maybank amendment, at the same 
time as it is opposing the May- 
bank proposal,” Sparkman said. 

(The NAREB proposal does not 
contain the all-important safeguard 
found in the Maybank bill, which 
provides that the administrator of 
the program, to be appointed by the 
President, must satisfy himself that 
the applicant is a genuine co-opera- 
tive and not a phony organization.) 

R euther then gave the com- 
mittee another example »f 
what he politely called “incon- 
sistency” on the part of the real 
estate lobby. 

On Jan. 13, he said, Horace 
Russell, general counsel of the 
U. S. Savings & Loan League, 
called the Maybank amendment 
“pure socialism” and said it was 
“designed and intended to mis- 
lead the American people.” 

But on April 29, 191^9, he had 
gone on record in support of HR 


a hill which asked $5 billion 
- for direct, long-term loans to vet- 
erans^ cooperatives at an even 
lower interest rate than is now 
under consideration, Reuther said. 

Again, the difference was that 
the $5 billion proposal contained 
no safeguards, requiring appli- 
cants to certify that they are not 
building homes for profit, the 
UAW head continued. 

“He favored that huge pro- 
gram,” Reuther said, “but now he 
opposes lending less moneji on 
the same basis because it would 
actually give people the right to 
build their own homes and not 
permit the speculators to milk 
the American people.” 

(Russell also told the House Vet- 
erans Committee last spring that one 
reason he favored the $5 billion loan 
program was that “if it is adopted 
then Congress won’t pass the Taft- 
Ellender-Wagner bill,” which pro- 
vided government-financed low-cost 
housing.) 

■■|F THERE was any misrepre- 
■ sentation going on,” Reuther 
declared, “Russell was doing it. 


not the writers of this bill.” 

NAREB’s spoken objections to 
the Maybank proposal, according 
to the committee record, have 
been on a lofty plane. “It will 
benefit only one-thirtieth of the 
middle-income group and dis- 
criminate against the rest,” said 
John C. Thompson of NAREB, 
implying that if the gover/iment 
could not extend these benefits 
at oncq' to the approximately 8 
million families in the middle-in- 
come group, it was unfair to make 
a start. 

Reuther told the committee that 
the great bulk of CIO members 
“are disqualified from taking part 
in the low-income housing pro- 
gram because their incomes are 
too high, and unable to buy avail- 
able homes because their savings 
are too low.” 

“Anyone who calls co-operative 
housing socialistic is either insane 
or just downright dishonest,” 
Reuther continued. “The basic 
unit of Democracy is the family. 
This bill encourages home owner- 
ship, thus promotes the family.” 


U. S. Survey Shows: 


Rents Raised 16 to 41 in Six Decontrolled Cities 


By GERVASE N. LOVE 

A BULL market in crow for 
eating purposes, with 
landlords anci real estate lob- 
byists supplying the demand, 
loomed last week when Hous- 
ing Expediter Tighe E. Woods 
showed what happened when 
rents were decontrolled in six 
large cities. 

The landlords and real estate 
lobbyists have been proclaiming 
that rents would rise only mod- 
erately if controls were ended. 
Woods’ disclosure, based on a sur- 
vey made for him by the U. S. 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed 
just how wrong they were and 
confirmed CIO forecasts of un- 
reasonable and in soime cases fan- 
tastic jumps. 

The survey showed: 

• Percentagewise, increase in 
the six cities averaged from 16.2 
to 41.3% monthly. 

• In dollars, the average boost 
ranged from $6.61 to $13.66 
monthly. 

• In five of the six cities the 
heaviest increases were imposed 
on units renting for $30 or less a 
month, with those in the $30 to 
$49.99 classification getting the 
.vjecond heaviest tap. 

• The longer decontrol is in 
effect, the greater the number of 
increases. 

Cities surveyed for Wood by the 
BLS were Dallas and Houston, 
Tex.; Topeka, Kan.; Knoxville, 
Tenn.; Salt Lake City, Utah, and 
Jacksonville, Fla. The survey was 
made last November and covered 
only dwellings on which rents 
could be boosted after decontrol. 
Thus houses and apartments un- 
der continuous leases and units 
decontrolled previously were ex- 
cluded. 

D allas, first of the cities to 
decontrol itself, showed the 
greatest number of increases and 
the highest dollar increases. Be- 
tween June 23, 1949, and the time 
of the survey, landlords put the 
bite on 67% of the tenants not 
protected by leases. The average 
increase for all types of units was 
35.4% or $13.66 a month. 

But in the lowest cost range, up 


Omaha Rents Up 
As Much As 166 % 

The dear hearts and gentle 
people who rent houses and 
apartments in Omaha, Nebr., 
have gouged their tenants so 
thoroughly since rent controls 
were ended that Mayor Glenn 
Cunningham is crying for help. 

Citing increases up to 166% 
since decontrol became effective 
Nov. 2, Cunningham asked Gov> 
Val Peterson to call a special 
session of the Legislature to slap 
controls back on. The decontrol 
law was passed over the gov- 
ernor’s veto. 

Peterson, claiming a “genuine 
state of emergency exists in 
Omaha,” charged landlords with 
breaking their pledge not to 
raise rents more than 10 or 15% 
even before controls actually 
ended. As an example he cited 
one two-room apartment on 
which the rent was jumped from 
$26.50 to $60 a month. 


to $30 monthly, 75% of the tenants 
whose rents could be boosted 
found themselves paying an aver- 
age of 55.8% more, or $10.^5 addi- 
tional every month. And the land- 
lords who crack the whip on units 
in the $30 to $49.99 category hit 
59% of their tenants to the tune 
of 36.2% more a month for an 
average $14.09 hike. Even middle- 
and upper-bracket tenants^id not 
escape. In this range 66% of the 
units were increased by an aver- 
age 26.2%, or $17.14 monthly. 

“It appears significant that the 
longer a city has been decon- 
trolled the more general the rent 
rise,” Woods commented. 

“The range among the six cities 
surveyed is from 67% in Dallas to 
31% in Houston. While both cities 
are in the same state, Dallas had 
been decontrolled five months, 
Houston only one month when the 
survey was made. This would 
seem to belie the contention of 
opponents of rent control that 
when a city is decontrolled pre- 
maturely, rents will rise at first, 
then level off and even drop. 

“At least one explanation why 
the full effect of rent decontrol is 


not felt during the first few 
months of decontrol is the fact 
that a favorite device used in per- 
suading a city governing body to 
pass a decontrol resolution is to 
present a pledge from landlords 
not to increaseTents unreasonably 
when the lid is off.” 

Meantime, the fight to continue 
controls where they still exist is 
shaping up. Next month Woods 
will ask Congress for a deficiency 
appropriation of $4 million to 
carry on his office’s activities until 
the present act expires June 30. 
President Truman has- notified 
Congressional leaders that an ex- 
tension of the act is a “must,” and 
the chances are a bill will be in- 
troduced in April. The real estate 
lobby can be counted upon to op- 
pose both measures, hoping by 
starving the Office of the Housing, 
Expediter through lack of funds 
for enforcement to end decontrols 
ahead of time. 


Tenants^ Frietuls 
Aided By CIO 

Three Oakland, Calif, City Coun- 
cil members whose scalps are 
sought by landlord and real estate 
■groups because they voted for low- 
rent public housing will have the 
full support of the East Bay CIO. 

The three last fall voted to ap- 
prove a $450,000 Federal loan for 
surveys preliminary to construc- 
tion of 3000 public housing units. 
In retaliation the real estate peo- 
ple forced them into a recall elec- 
tion which has been scheduled 
for Feb. 28. 

The Alameda County Committee 
for National CIO already is deep 
in the fight to save jobs of the 
three councilmen — former Mayor 
Joseph E. Smith, Raymond E. 
Pease and Scott Weakley. In a 
recent plant leaflet distribution 
CIO members were warned that 
the attack on public housing in 
Oakland is “part of a pattern” of 
national attacks on housing, rent 
controls and other social legisla- 
tion. Chairman Arnold F. Campo 
said the Committee is planning 
to impress upon every CIO mem- 
ber the need for voting against 
the recall. 


What Survey Showed 

Here’s what happens when rents are decontrolled, according to the 
six-city survey made by the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics for Hous- 
ing Expediter Tighe E. Woods: 






Average 

Average 

Name 

Decontrol 


Percent of 

Dollar 

Percent 

of 

Date 

Monthly Eligible Units 

Increase 

Increase 

City 

(1949) 

Rent Range 

Increased 

Monthly 

Monthly 

Dallas 

6-23 

All ranges 

67 

$13.66 

35.4 



Under $30 

75 

10.95 

55.8 



$30-$49.99 

59 

14.09 

36.2 



$50 and over 

66 

17.14 

26.2 

Houston 

10-19 

All ranges 

31 

12.65 

41.3 



Under $30 

44 

10.46 

46.4 



$30-$49.99 

28 

15.20 

40.5 



$50 and over 

11 

13.84 

25.8 

Topeka 

,9-14 

All ranges 

40 

9.05 

30.3 



Under $30 

50 

7.09 

37.7 



$30-$49.99 

42 

11.38 

29.4 



$50 and over 

13 

8.12 

13.8 

Knoxville 

6-14 

All ranges 

61 

6.88 

26.8 



Under $30 

63 

5.21 

36.1 



$30-$49.99 

61 

9.78 

24.5 



$50 and over 

45 

6.11 

11.1 

Salt Lake City 8-5 

All ranges 

46 

6.48 

16.2 



Under $30 

48 

5.96 

26.3 



$30-$49.99 

49 

6.76 

17.0 . 



$50 and over 

37 

6.37 

10.3 

Jacksonville 8-5 

All ranges 

56 

6.61 

26.2 


(Breakdown not 
yet available) 


Things Are Tough All Over 
Except In United States 

The following is from a recent discussion among CBS overseas 
correspondents about economic conditions throughout the world: 

MR. MURROW: Perhaps one of the best ways of measuring our 
good fortune at this half-century is to examine what people in foreign 
lands regard as luxuries. 

MR. SMITH: Well, in Britain, darn near everything British-made 
is a luxury. Hats, textiles and, alas, Scotch whiskey are all for export 
only. ^ 

MR. DOWNS: Well, in Germany, it’s doorknobs with houses on 
the other end. 

MR. SCHOENBRUN: And in France, hot tap water or a cake 
of fat soap. 

MR. BURDETT: In Italy, an orange or a clean, unfrayed shirt. 
In the countryside, a luxury is an electric light, a telephone, a panned 
road. 

MR. COSTELLO: Don’t think this is exaggeration — but for one 
billion people in Asia — that’s half the world’s population — anything 
more than a pound of rice a day borders on luxury. 


2 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 


N 



Big Business ‘Take’ 
20% After Taxes 


Senate Passes Oleo 
Tax Repeal Bill 


By DONALD WOODS 

Labor Press Association 

O NE OF the most reveal- 
ing profit reports ever 
published has been issued by 
the Federal Trade Commission. 

It discloses that since the 
war Big Business has been 
making around 20% profit on 
its invested capital, compared 
with about half that before 
the war. And that 20% is 
after taxes. 

The figures give the direct lie 
to the shrieks of Big Business 
that the New Deal and the Fair 
Deal have ruined them and have 
cut so heavily into profits that 
there is no incentive to expand. 
They also show the profit rate is 
highest for the biggest companies 
in each field, and that the more 
concentrated the control of an 
industry, the higher the profit 
rate. 

The FTC report shows the mo- 
tor vehicle industry led the entire 
procession in 1948, with a profit 
of 25%, after taxes, whereas the 
return in 1940 was 17.3%. And 
1949 was the greatest year for 
the auto industry in production, 
sales, and profits. 

The FTC study covered 528 
identical corporations in 25 select- 
ed industries, and showed rates of 
return (after taxes) on stockhold- 
ers' investment in 1940, 1947 and 
1948 “adjusted to exclude reported 
accelerated depreciation on post- 
war facilities." 

The Commission reported that 
in both 1947 and 1948 there was 
“a clustering of rates of return 
around the figure of 20% for about 
half of the industries studied." 


General Motors Chairman 
Alfred P. Sloan has disclosed 
that his company earned more 
profits last year (over $600 
million) than any other com- 
pany ever made in a similar 
period. He termed the ac- 
complishment “satisfactory.'' 

Sloan, in a New York City “For- 
ward from Fifty" luncheon at- 
tended by 500 industrial and fi- 
nancial leaders, asked for a re- 
warding pat-on-the-back from the 
country’s politicians, .whom he 
said “should be inclined to en- 
courage a performance of this 
magnitude." 

He stated that last years’ profits 
“are likely to move up to over 
$600 million." 

The GM board chairman’s 
speech had a disparagement for 


Analysis of the figures showed 
that in 1940 only two out of the 
25 industries were in the 25% 
class, and 16 of them were “clus- 
tered" around 10%. Highest was 
around 17%. 

THE REPORT shows clearly 
■ that most of Big Business, 
which was satisfied to make about 
10% profit on its invested capital 
before the war, is now demanding 
20% profit on its war-infiated cap- 
ital structure. 

The Commission reported the 
industries showing the greatest 
increase in their profit rates be 
tween 1940 and 1948 were: 

Rayon — up from 8.6 to 20.3%. 

Petroleum refining — from 6.7 to 
19.4%. 

Bread — up from 7.6 to 19.8%. 

Office and store machines and 
devices — up from 13.2 to 23.9%. 

Paper and allied products — up 
from 9.6 to 18.2%. 

Wool carpets and rugs — up from 
8.9 to 17.3%. 

Biscuits and crackers — up from 
8.8 to 17%. 

Linoleum and felt base — up from 
7.5 to 15.4%. 

Motor vehicles — up from 17.3 to 
23%. 

Altogether the "Commission 
found that in 1948, of the 25 big 
industries studied, 12 showed prof- 
its around 20% while two others 
— motor vehicles and office equip- 
ment — were in excess of 23%. Of 
the remaining big industries, 
three had profits between 15 and 
17%; six had 10-15%, and only 
two had less than 10%. 

The only industries showing 
lower returns in 1948 than in 
1940 were cigars and cigarettes, 
both of which have found it diffi- 
cult to raise their prices. 


company stockholders, who earned 
$1100 million during the period. 
He inferred that the record-break- 
ing 1949 profits were less impres- 
sive when viewed in the light of 
return on capital employed. 

“If we compare 1949 with 1936," 
he said, “we find that the return 
on capital employed rose only 
three percentage points. And to 
accomplish this we had to in- 
crease our sales in terms of 1949 
dollars from $2500 million for 1936 
to $5500 million in 1949." He in- 
dicated that the process hadn’t 
been easy. 

(Ed. Note; A profit of $600 mil- 
lion-a-year amounts to $68,493 an 
hour.) 

In view of GM’s record break- 
ing profit year, CIO Auto Worker 
officials were wondering what the 
attitude of the company would be, 
come negotiation time. The pres- 
ent agreement expires May 29. 


VE Stalls 
W’House, GE 
Elections 

H earings on petitions for 
Labor Board elections at 
(General Electric and Westing- 
house are moving slowly as a 
result of backing - and - filing 
tactics by counsel for the 
United Electrical Workers. 

The UE was expelled from the 
CIO in November on grounds of 
Communist domination. The new 
CIO-chartered lUE has won to its 
ranks close to a quarter of a mil- 
lion former UE members and is 
pressing for early elections in the 
big corporations of the industry. 

The “old UE" has made public 
statements also indicating a de- 
sire for voting as soon as possible, 
but its legal tactics show interest 
in delay rather than speed, ac- 
cording to lUE officials. 

A t general Electric, the com- 
pany, the “old UE" and the' 
CIO-IUE have agreed on defini- 
tions of collective bargaining units 
in 85 out of 100 cases. But in 15 
others, the company is trying to 
break down the old units into 
new, smaller ones. 

In addition, the independent 
Inti. Association of Machinists and 
four AFL unions ar^ seeking to 
carve out craft units out of the 
big industrial bargaining groups 
in various GE plants. 

The UE contract with GE ex- 
pires April 1. The expelled union 
has played both sides of the street, 
arguing at various times that (1) 
elections should be held in Febru- 
ary, and (2) that the present con- 
tract bars the holding of NLRB 
elections until April. 

The CIO-IUE is seeking the 
election as soon as possible. 

700 Attend N. C. 
Political Rally 

Seven hundred persons at- 
tended a dinner rally of the 
United Labor Political Committee 
in Durham, N.C., last week. 

Members of CIO, AFL and un- 
affiliated unions and the rail- 
road brotherhoods attended. 
Speakers included Dir. Jack Kroll 
of CIO-PAC; Joseph Keenan, 
chairman of the AFL Labor’s. 
League for Political Education, 
and Gov. W. Kerr Scott, of North 
Carolina. 

Board Is Named For 
Broun Award Contest 

The winner of the 1949 Hey- 
wood Broun Award will be chosen 
by Alan Barth, Washington Post 
editorial writer; John Hersey, 
noted author and newspaper 
writer, Quentin Reynolds, maga- 
zine writer, and Roland E. Wolse- 
ley, professor of journalism at 
Syracuse University. 

The award is given by the CIO 
Newspaper Guild for the most 
outstanding newspaper job of the 
year in the spirit of Heywood 
Broun. The award is $500 and 
a Guild Citation. Entries should 
be sent to the ANG, 99 Uni- 
versity Place, New York 3, N. Y. * 
Deadline is Feb. 1. 

The annual award, started in 
1941, is in memory of Heywood 
Broun, crusading liberal columnist 
who founded the Guild. He died 
in 1939. 



Bucks For PAC Are 
Knockout Drops 
To Lick Labor-Hating 
Dixiegops 



•HE FEDERAL tax on oleo- 
■ margarine last week headed 
for the legislative ashcan, after 
having been on the statute 
book for decades. 

By a 56-16 vote, the Senate 
passed and sent to a joint con- 
ference committee a bill to repeal 
taxes and license fees imposed 
to make it a less hardy competi- 
tor of butter products. 

A similar bill had been passed 
last year in the House. Like the 
Senate bill, it was vigorously op- 
posed by spokesmen from many 
dairy-farming districts. 

The present law provides a 10c 
a pound tax on colored margar- 
arine, plus a series of sizeable 
license fees on producers, whole- 
salers and retailers who handle 
the product. 

T he senate bin differs from 
the House version principally 
through a provision that colored 
margarine be sold in triangular 
packages — so that it will be clear- 
ly distinguishable from butter. 

The bill ran a gauntlet of ham- 
pering amendments designed to 
make it unattractive to Senators 
from the polltax states of the 
south. Offered as amendments 
were proposals to set up an FEPC, 
to repeal the polltax, to make 
lynching a federal crime, and to 
repeal all wartime excise taxes on 
consumer goods. 

The civil rights amendments 
were offered by Sen Langer (R., 
N. D.), a violent foe of the oleo 
tax repeal bill. Administration 
supporters charged the North 
Dakota Senator with using the 
civil rights matter simply to pro- 
vide a stumbling block for the 
oleo bill. 

The Langer amendments were 
voted down on that basis, by mar- 
gins of 60-20 and 59-17. Stalwart 
supporters of civil rights voted 
with the majority, in order to 
pass the oleo bill. 

Also rejected, by a smaller mar- 
gin, was a proposal by Sen. But- 
ler (R. Neb.), to tack on a repeal 


of all excise taxes. That one was 
licked. 43-32. 

The final 56-16 vote cut through 
party lines. Voting against the bill 
were 12 Republicans — most of 
them from midwest dairy states — 
and four liberal Democrats, also 
from butter producing areas. 

Other Congressional develop- 
ments: ^ 

BASING POINTS: The CIO, in 
wires to 25 Senators, called for 
votes against the joint Senate- 
House conference report on the 
basing point bill, (S. 1008) which 
deals with pricing practices of 
big corporations. 

Nathan Cowan, CIO legislative 
director, said that “whatever its 
original purpose, the present bill 
would weaken anti-trust laws and 
place obstacles to its enforcement 
against price fixing and predatory 
monopoly practices. Amendments 
of its confusing language will 
only create more confusion. It 
should be killed." 

LABOR EXTENSION SERV- 
ICE: The Senate Labor & Public 
Welfare Committee held a series 
of closed discussions on H.R. 1380, 
designed to set up workers educa- 
tion projects in collaboration 
with labor unions, schools and 
colleges. The bill, strongly en- 
dorsed by CIO and AFL, has also 
been under consideration in the 
House Labor Committee. 

SOCIAL SECURITY: The Com- 
mittee has opened hearings on 
H. R. 6000, the House-passed meas- 
ure to improve social security. 
CIO will appear during coming 
weeks, with proposals along the 
lines suggested by CIO Social 
Security Committee. 

Use Of Electricity 
On Farms Doubled 

Use of electric power on farms 
has almost doubled in two 
years, according to the annual 
report of the Rural Electrification 
Administration. Kilowatt hours 
billed to consumers for fiscal year 
1947 totalled 2,900 million in 1949, 
the figure was 5,500 million. 



— From St. Louis Post Dispatch 

Totalitarian Bird Roosting in America 

THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 


An Important Speech 

Issues involved in the demands of the CIO Communications Work- 
ers of America for wage increases from the Bell telephone system will 
be explained to the general public in an important network speech next 
week. 

CWA Pres. Joseph Beirne will speak on Wednesday night, January 
25. 

The speech will be broadcast over some 130 stations of the ABC 
network. It will be heard at 9:30 P.M., eastern time; 8:30 PJVI., central 
time; 8:30 P.M., mountain time; 9:00 P.M., Pacific time. 

Check the radio columns of your local ABC station to find out 
what time the speech will be heard in your community. 

Be sure to listen to this important speech about an issue that 
affects every worker — and every city and town — in the U. S. A. 

Ever Earn $68,493 
An Hour? GM Did 


3 








1 ^ 


Lefties Charge Conspiracy And Seek Infunctions 


Use Old Employer Union-Busting Weapons In Effort 

By ALLAN L. SWIM 


To Avoid Expuision From CIO By Executive Board 


T he party-line lads certainly 
took a leaf out of the employers* 
union-busting book when they went 
kito court recently in an effort to halt 
hearings on Communist - domination 
charges against 10 CIO unions. 

In the first place, they entered court 
under the Taft-Hartley Act, which they 
process to hate more than anybody else 
does. 

They used the old employers’ trick of 
charging conspiracy. 

And they sought to obtain injunctions 
which would prevent the CIO Executive 
Board from carrying out a mandate of the 
last CIO convention. 

P erhaps using a Taft-Hartley provi- 
sion to get their case before federal 
courts was more or less of a technicality. 

But there was nothing “purely technical” 
about their charge of conspiracy and their 
request for injunctions. 

They attempted to use the legal weapons 
which unionists learned years ago to abhor. 


Furthermore, their entire action was 
directly contrary to the old trade union 
“rule” that you try to settle inter-family 
quarrels out of court. 

The party-liners certainly knew these 
things and how unionists generally feel 
about them, but they took legal action 
anyhow. 

T he “GREAT conspiracy” in Which CIO 
leaders are engaged is about as con- 
sipiratorial as a drink of plain water. 

They took their case before the CIO 
convention last year. They discussed it 
openly from the speakers’ platform. 

Philip Murray and his colleagues said 
bluntly that the CIO should rid itself of 
Communist influences. 

Constitutional changes which would per- 
mit the CIO to deal with the Communist 
problem were presented to the delegates — 
and a majority of delegates approved the 
changes. 

Then the convention instructed the Ex- 
ecutive Board to deal with Red charges 
which had been openly filed against 10 
unions. 


Conspiracy? Nuts! 


T he PARTY-LINERS are attempting to 
make a strong case against the hearing 
committees appointed by Murray. 

These, they say, serve as “prosecutor, 
judge and jury.” And when they say it 
they’re either lying deliberately or they 
don’t know what they’re talking about. 

The committees have no power other 
than to told hearings and make recom- 
mendations. They have been receiving tes- 
timony from both the accused and the ac- 
cusers. 

The CIO Executive Board is the group 
which will determine whether the unions 
are to be expelled — and the accused will 
have an opportunity to argue their case 
before the Board. 

O NE OF THE most amusing accusations 
made by the lefties is that the CIO 
“has set everything up so it can kick out 
10 unions.” "" 

The manner in which they make the 
“charge” indicates they’re talking about 
some great secret. 

Every person who attended the last CIO 
convention knew the CIO intended to kick 
out 10 unions if they were found guilty 
as charged. 


The CIO established a procedure to bring 
this about. This was done openly and with 
much publicity. 

Imagine how ridiculous it would have 
been had the CIO announced it would act 
against the Commies without setting up 
machinery which could make such action 
effective. 

T here are very few union groups 
which are provided three hearings re- 
gardless of the nature of charges brought 
against them. 

In this respect the Commies get a break. 
They had an opportunity at the last con- 
vention to argue their case. The hearing 
committees offer the second opportunity— 
and the Executive Board offers the third. 

And those who were present knew that 
the convention delegates were in a mood 
to kick the party-liners out on their ears 
then and there! 

It’s a significant thing that only one 
of the 10 accused unions — the Furniture 
Workers— has made any move since the 
convention to set its house in order. 

The others haven’t evem been pleading 
Innocent. What they’re seeking to prove 
is that it’s OK for them to follow the party 
line — regardless of a convention mandate. 


That Man Denham! 

It looks as if Robert N. Denham is doing his darndest to 
take away from Senator Taft the unenviable title of ''The Man 
Labor Likes Least.*’ 

Denham, the NLRB’s general counsel, really cut a fancy 
di-do recently at an employers’ meeting at New York City. 

Denham, in effect, told the group: 

"If the NLRB should rule against you in any controversy 
you should fight the matter out in court.” 

Such advice coming from a NAM lawyer wouldn’t have been 
out of place — but Denham is the man who is charged by law 
with the duty of defending the NLRB and its decisions in court ! 

Denham’s action would be paralleled if the prosecuting 
attorney in a criminal case told the defendant: 

"If this stupid jury should find you guilty you should imme- 
diately appeal to a higher court.” 

Following the New York speech, CIO Pres. Philip Murray 
asked — again — that Denham be booted out of office. His first 
request was made last November during the CIO convention. 

Murray said Denham’s invitation to employers to go into 
court "is sufficient proof (if any additional proof is needed) 
that Denham is incapable of administering the important post 
of general counsel of the Board with the fairness and impar- 
tiality that office requires.” / 

And at this point about the only good thing we can say 
about Denham is that he doesn’t make any. pretense of being fair 
and impartial. 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfllllllllllllillllllllllilllilllHilllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIiltlilllllillilll^ 


yetus 


Congress of Industrial Organizations 

Philip Murray, President James B. Carey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vice Presidents: Joseph A. Beirne, L S. Buckmaster, Joseph Curran, 
John Green, Allan S. Haywood, O. A. Knight, Walter P. 
Reuther, Emil Rieve, Frank Rosenblum. 


Allan L Swim, Editor and Publicity Director 


Assistant Publicity Director: Henry C. Fleisher 
Assistant Editors: Hollace Ransdell, Fred Ross, Arthur Riordan, (OnAeave), 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark, William Weiss, Gervase N. Love 


Entered as Second Class Matter, Post Office, Washington, D. C. 
Under the Act of Aug. 24. 1912 and Feb. 28. 1925. 


A. & P. Challenges Free Enterprise — Nathan 


Editorial Office, 718 Jackson Place, N. W,, Washington 6, D. Ci 


yoL XIII January 23, 1950 

4, THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 


M any business men^ who 

preach competition in public 
practice naonopoly in private, 
Robert R. Nathan, noted econo- 
mist, said in his CIO-sponsored 
broadcast over the ABC network 
last week. 

Nathan’s observation was pro- 
moted by resumption of the At- 
lantic & Pacific Tea Co’s, adver- 
tising campaign to discredit the 
anti-trust division of the U. S. 
Dept, of Justice. 

The company was found guilty 
of charges of conspiracy to re- 
strain and monopolize trade, and 
paid a fine. The anti-trust divi- 
sion is now sueing to alter the 
firm’s structure so as to stop 
the illegal practices. 

“What does this A&P case 
really mean to all of us?” asked 
Nathan in his broadcast. 

“Simply, if we are to have a 
free competitive system, it must 
be free and it must be competi- 
tive. It must operate in, accord- 
ance with the rules laid down by 
the people and their duly elected 
representatives. Our anti-trust and 
fair trade laws were enacted by 
a democratically elected Congress. 
They have been on the books for 
a long time and have served a 
valuable purpose. They should be 
supported and enforced. 

■■|N ALL MY years in Wash- 
■ ington, I can’t recall any 
busines spokesman ever publicly 
praising the anti-trust division 
for its work. And surely it works 
on behalf of a free competitive 
economy. Every anti-trust prose- 
cution is called a persecution. 
“Even where companies or in- 

Only 324,000 Are 
Jobless In Britain 

Total working population of 
Britain now exceeds 22,250,000. 

No less than 12,500,000 of the 
employed workpeople are concen- 
trated in such basic industries as 
coalmining and quarrying, power 
industries, transport and agricul- 
ture, together with a great group 
of manufacturing industries which 
included c h em i c a 1 and allied 
trades, the metals, engineering 
and vehicle building trades, the 
textile clothing, food, drink, to- 
bacco trades and so on. In No- 
vember the total number of work- 
people registered as unemployed 
was less than 324,000. 


dustries have admitted violating 
the law and Jiave agreed to re- 
form, the anti-trust division is 
still criticized. The A&P case is 
a challenge. If we are going to 
preserve our free enterprise sys- 
tem, let us protect it from attack 
on all sides.” 

Nathan said that the U. S. Dis- 
trict Court in which the con- 
spiracy charge was tried found 
the evidence showed that the 
company was guilty beyond a 
reasonable doubt. A U. S. Cir- 
cuit Court of Appeals, he added, 
unanimously upheld the convic- 
tion in an opinion which de- 
scribed in detail some of the 
harmful acts by which A&P ille- 
gally killed competition. 

“Here is how A&P competitors 
were put on an unfair disadvan- 
tage,” said Nathan, citing the 
court records. “With its great 
buying power and ruthless force, 
it compelled producers and whole- 
salers to sell to A&P at much 
lower prices than to other re- 
tailers. In fact, other retailers 
had to pay higher than normal 
prices to make up for the special 
favors to A&P. This was spelled 
out by the court when it said 


‘the supplier had to make his 
profit out of his other customers 
at higher prices.’ 

II A&P COMPELLED its sup 
pliers to discontinue nor- 
mal business practices which 
might in any way be of value to 
other retail stores. A&P’s buying 
policies hurt free competition and 
free enterprise. Its tactics re- 
sulted in the raising of prices 
to its competitors. 

“The court found that the com- 
pany varied its retail prices from 
one area to another to gain com- 
petitive advantages. Where com- 
petition was tough, A&P would 
arbitrarily lower prices and take 
planned losses. Here, customers 
benefited temporarily until A&P 
weakened its competitors and 
strengthened its own position. Its 
customers elsewhere subsidized 
these losses by paying higher 
prices. 

“A&P’s ads would have you be- 
lieve the company was simply ac- 
cused of having regularly under- 
sold its competitors. This just is 
not the case.” 

Nathan broadcasts regularly for 
the CIO each Tuesday at 10:45 
p.m., EST, over the ABC network* 



SERVICE WITH A SMIRK 



ORAWN FOP rug 
KATX CIO NFvy$ 


ECA Aide: British Production In 2 Years Near 5-Year Goal 


Fire Commissioner 
Called Off 
His ‘Dogs’ 

I T ALL began when some men in uniform 
attended a CIO Council meeting as 
guests one night during the war. 

After the session, one of the soldiers 
said to a Council officer. “What we need 
in this town is a labor-operated canteen — 
a place where the boys can have some fun 
and talk shop.’" 

At the next meeting the Council voted 
to establish a canteen and named a com- 
mittee to handle arrangements. 

After several weeks the group located 
and then rented suitable quarters, and 
committee members were most enthusi- 
astic. 

Then the trouble began. 

I N THIS particular city the CIO Council 
was on one side of the political fence 
and the city administration was on the 
other. And the city administration frowned 
hard on the idea of a CIO canteen. 

This lirst became evident when a fire 
inspector said the building which had 
been rented was unsafe for crowds of the 
size expected. 

The next evidence came when the 
Council’s effort to obtain sugar to serve 
with coffee was blocked by persons con- 
nected with the political machine which 
dominated the city. 

Then the Council was turned down 
when it sought to purchase a big exhaust 
fan to cool the canteen. 

^HE SUGAR problem was solved when 
* unionists throughout town pledged to 
donate small amounts from their own 
limited supplies. 

Then a Council delegate turned up one 
day with a small exhaust fan-^an old 
one — and several other fans. 

But the fire inspector was a determined 
man who was going to do his duty as his 
political bosses saw it. 

He showed up at the canteen a few 
hours before time for the grand opening 
and “discovered” ^.or the first time— al- 
though he had been around before— that 
the floor supports were too weak to hold 
up the anticipated crowd. 

As a result, only a limited number was 
admitted. 

.^HE FLOOR supports were reinforced 
■ a few days later and the inspector was 
called in to look the job over. 

They were OK, he said, but the Council 
would have to provide an exit thrpugh 
the basement, although the crowd wasn't 
admitted below the ground floor. 

An exit was provided— through the base- 
ment of an adjoining restaurant and then 
through, its kitchen. 

The inspector then “discovered” that the 
wiring wasn't safe. CIO electricians said 
he didn’t know what he was talking about 
but they made the changes he requested. 

The canteen operated without interrup- 
tion for a week, and then another fire 
inspector showed up. 

I NSPECTOR No. 2 went over the place 
carefully, called Council officers into a 
huddle and said sadly: ^ 

“You fellows will have to close down 
unless you cut an exit through that brick 
wall. You’ve just got to have another one.” 

The next day the Council president 
called on the. fire commissioner and told 
him bluntly, “You’ve got to call off your 
dogs down at the canteen.” 

“Are you asking me or telling me?” 
asked the commissioner. 

“I’m telling you. We've got a dozen 
soldiers and sailors circulating petitions 
of protest against the city at all the 
camps in the area. The newspapers — and 
the city administration — won’t be able to 
ignore what those fellows say about you. 
They’ll paint you as an unpatriotic heel.” 

The commissioner thought the matter 
over, then said, “Maybe I can afford to be 
a heel but not an unpatriotic one. The 
dogs are palled off.” 

After t^lat the fire inspectors, dropped 
in occasionally — ^just for a cup of coffee. 

A.L.S. 


By WILLIAM C. GAUSSMAN 

Labor Information Officer, 

Special, ECA Mission to the United Kingdom 

IT IS TIME THAT everyone recognized 
■ what a good job our workers and man- 
agements are, on the whole, doing and no- 
body should make the ridiculous sugges- 
tion that our people are not working, de- 
clared Sir Stafford Cripps, British Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer, summing up Brit- 
ain’s accomplishments during the second 
year of the Marshall plan. 

British production is now 30% above 
pre-war levels, the Labor government’s 
spokesman revealed. 

Productivity — output per man hour — has 
risen by 5% above 1948 levels — and that 
year’s record was 5% above the previous 
year. This increase in industrial efficiency 
has been the major factor contributing to 
Britain’s 20% increase in total production 
during the first two years of the Marshall 


Intolerance is a poison administered by 
intolerant majorities to minorities. It is a 
deadly poison to the minorities. The only 
antidote the minorities can use for their 
poison is, in turn, equally poison to the ma- 
jority groups. 

Suppose tomorrow we should start sneer- 
ing, patronizing, and persecuting the Bap- 
tists. Day after tomorrow the Baptists would 
organize for their own protection. They’d 
have to. The result would be that the meas- 
ures they took for their own protection 
would, in the minds of the dominant ma- 
jority, call for greater restrictive measures, 
which in turn would bring forth more de- 
termined efforts at resistance. • 


Plan. The long-term program submitted 
by the British when the Marshall Plan was 
under discussion called for an increase of 
25% in five years. 

The achievement of British coal miners 
and steel workers have been outstanding, 
and they have made possible the increased 
output in other industries. Each miner 
is digging more coal per shift than pre- 
war. No other European country has yet 
hit pre-war averages. The steel industry 
is producing more than the “target” antic- 
ipated. 

C RIPPS’ FIGURES demonstrate too that 
Britain has been playing her part in 
accomplishing another Marshall Plan ob- 
jective — the integration of the European 
economy. During the past year Britain’s 
exports to other Marshall Plan countries 
have increased, and her imports from 
them have advanced at even greater speed. 
Progress has also been made towards 


And so it goes in a vicious circle! 

Suppose four men were in a boat a mile 
or so above Niagara Falls. Four men, a 
Jew, a Protestant, a Catholic, and a Negro. 
They have four oars. If they want to use 
those oars for rowing, they take the boat 
to either bank they choose. If they use 
the oars as clubs by which they can push 
each other around they can drift with the 
current to a point where no amotmt of 
rowing will possibly save them. They’ll 
all be swept to destruction. 

We’re all in the same boat, today and 
we’re drifting with the current. 

Who wants to start rowing? 

— Erie Stanley Gardner 


meeting the “dollar gap.” Imports from 
the U. S. amount to only 22% of the goods 
coming into the British Isles today, as 
compared with 34% two years ago. The 
sterling value of British exports to the 
U. S. has risen, during the same period, 
although since devaluation their dollar 
value has declined. 

Sir Stafford is convinced that devalua- 
tion creates the opportunities for further 
increasing British-area exports to the U. S. 
that will overcome that loss. As he dis- 
closed in an earlier statement, Britain’s 
dollar reserves and gold reserves have 
both improved in recent months. 

A LL THIS HAS been accomplished 
without sacrificing the social goals of 
the labor movement, Cripps emphasized. 
“Domestically we have aimed to maintain 
and strengthen our democratic way of life, 
stressing the need for social justice in or- 
der to preserve and extend our essential 
liberties,” he said. 

“We have maintained the principles 
and practices of fair shares. We have in- 
sisted upon full employment, while pro- 
tecting the economy against the conse- 
quent fears of inflation. We have sought 
to increase slowly but surely the stand- 
ards of the less well paid section of the 
population by stepping up production and 
productivity and by some measure of re- 
distribution of wealth through taxation 
and the social services.” 

The government's statement also point- 
ed out that while wage rates have not 
quite kept up with recent fractional ad- 
vances in living costs, increases in the 
workers’ net earnings have. Earnings in 
Britain exceed wage rates by a greater 
per cent than is the case in the U. S. be- 
cause of a wider use of piece rates and 
bonuses. 


TREACHEROUS CURRENTS 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1960 


5 



CIO, AFL Form United Political Front In N. Y. C. 



THIS CHART from the PAC pamphlet '‘The Case of the Missing 
Ballots” tells the sad story of low votes in off-election years. 
Seventy-one liberal Congressmen were defeated in 1946, and 51 
liberal Congressmen lost in 1942. The 80th (“Worst”) Congress, 
elected in 1946, was the one that passed T-H. 


Ohio CIO Withholds 
Nod in Senate Raee 


By AL ZACK 

“iJE JUST doesn’t measure 
n up.” 

That was the unanimous, un- 
official reaction of the 1200 
delegates to the 11th Constitu- 
tional Convention of the Ohio 
CIO Council, which Jan. 15, 
wound up its sessions at Cin- 
cinnati. 

They were speaking, of course, 
of Sen. Robert A. Taft, candidate 
for reelection. 

During the four days of delib- 
erations, the delegates had ham- 
mered out a liberal program of 
far-reaching importance to guide 
the council during the year. 

Refusing to be stampeded by 
newspaper predictions into njak- 
ing any indorsements at this 
early date, the convention had 
decided instead to fashion itself 
a yardstick to measure candidates. 

That yardstick is the legislative 
program of the Ohio CIO Coun- 
cil — a program which considers 
the problems of the worker, the 
farmer, the white-collar employe 
and the small businessman. 

, As the convention drew to a 
close and the yardstick was com- 
pleted, every delegate used it to 
measure Taft’s record. The re- 
sult was unanimous. 

Taft just didn’t measure up. 

J ACK KROLL., president of the 
Ohio CIO Council and direc- 
tor of national CIO-PAC, summed 
up the case against Taft as he 
spoke on the resolution on po- 
litical action. 

“The only thing we have against 
him (Taft) is his record — his 
whole record,” said Kroll. 

“It’s a record of double-talk, 
inconsistency and simon-pure re- 
action.” 

Kroll read the record on Taft, 
citing his speeches on one side of 
an issue and his votes on the 
other side of the same issue. 

“If ever there was a man who 
talks O'Ut of both sides of his 


mouth it is the senior senator 
from Ohio,” Kroll charged. 

Lashing out at Taft’s alleged 
interest in “liberty and freedom 
from government interference,” 
Kroll pointed to the record and 
charged, “the 'only kind of lib- 
erty Bob Taft cares about is the 
liberty of big business to make 
more profit and the liberty of the 
plain people to ‘eat less.* 

“He doesn’t give a damn about 
the economic liberties of the 
people from the wrong side of 
the tracks. He’s only interested 
in liberty for the ‘fat cats.’ ” 

B ut it was issues, problems, 
policies and program that in- 
terested the delegates to the 
Ohio CIO Convention most. 

These interests were many and 
varied. The delegates discussed 
matters ranging from political ac- 
tion to volunteer fire fighters in 
the plants . 

On political action, the conven- 
tion dedicated * itself to “the 
mightiest and most ^dynamic reg- 
istration and get - out - the - vote 
drive in Ohio's history.” The 
delegates showed they meant busi- 
ness by starting with themselves. 
They changed the council’s con- 
stitution to insist a delegate must 
be a registered voter to be seated 
at future conventions. 

Recognizing the hardships im- 
posed on voters by restrictive 
Ohio laws, the convention de- 
manded Gov. Frank J. Lausche 
call the Legislature into special 
session to revise registration and 
election laws. 

In other major actions the con- 
vention: 

REELECTED unanimously Jack 
Kroll to his ninth term as presi- 
dent, and Secy.-Treas. Jacob Clay- 
man to his second term, elected 
by acclamation a slate of 17 vice- 
presidents who comprise the exec- 
utive. board. 

APPLAUDED Labor Secy. Mau- 
rice J. Tobin for his warm words 
of support for President Truman’s 
State of the Union speech, and 
adopted a resolution hailing the 
President’s message as a “decla- 


C IO AND AFL unions in 
New York City represent- 
ing more than a million mem- 
bers have formed a permanent 
organization for a united po- 
litical front. 

They set up a United Labor 
Committee which will carry for- 
ward, on a year-round basis, po- • 
litical activities aimed at making 
labor’s strength effectively felt 
in elections and in relations with 
City Hall. The movement is an 
outgrowth of the close coopera- 
tion between the two groups last 
fall which was reflected in the 
election of U. S. Senator Herbert 
H. Lehman and the re-election of 
Mayor William O’Dwyer. 

Joint heads of the committee 
are Michael J. Quill, president of 
the New York CIO Council and of 
the Transport Workers Union, and 
Martin T. Lacey, president of the 
AFL Central Labor Trades. Per- 
manent secretaries are Morris 
lushewitz, secretary-treasurer of 
the CIO council, and James C. 
Quinn, who holds a similar office 
in the Central Trades. Permanent 
offices will be established soon. 

I N A STATEMENT issued 
through lushewitz it was em- 
phasized that both groups are 
equally anxious for the success 
of the venture. Both also saw in 
the political alliance a means of 
adjusting jurisdictional disputes, 
many of which have been settled 
amicably in the last few months 
as a result of the election cam- 
paign cooperation, and of aiding 
each other in organization. 

It was made clear that politi- 
cally, the committee will act in- 
dependently, though last fall it 
supported Democratic candidates 
only. The four officers, acting 
jointly, will serve as a political 
steering committee. 

The committee represents near- 
ly all of the larger unions in 
New York. However, left wing 
CIO unions are boycotting it, 
while some AFL unions will con- 
tinue to act politically through 
the Liberal Party or their own 
internationals. 

New York leaders expressed 
the hope their coalition would 
speed political union between 
CIO and AFL in the rest of the 
country. 


ration of independence with se- 
curity.” 

SHOWED it wasn’t fooling when 
it talked farmer-labor unity by 
giving a resounding welcome to 
Murray D. Lincoln, president of 
the Ohio Farm Bureau Insurance 
Companies and the biggest name 
in the farm cooperative move- 
ment. Lincoln, deploring the real 
estate lobby’s fight against co- 
operative housing, obtained CIO 
support for the proposal. 

HEARD Jack Livingston, Auto 
Workers vice president, predict 
that there would be a union shop 
in General Motors following the 
coming elections. 

APPLAUDED predictions by 
Secy.-Treas. David J. McDonald of 
the CIO Steelworkers of success 
for the. International Confedera- 
tion of Free Trade Unions. 

CHEERED Natl. CIO Vice Pres. 
Allan Haywood’s two-fisted attack 
on Communists and fellow^ trav- 
elers in the labor movement. 

HEARD John Brophy, CIO 
Councils director, detail the need 
for full use of America’s natural 
resources to better the living 
standards of its workers. 

PLEDGED support to the Com- 
munications Workers of America, 
CIO’s newest but husky baby, 
after hearing CWA Pres. Joseph 
A. Bierne label the American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. a 
“sheltered monopoly.” 



$100 FOR PAC: Miss Theresa Courey, secretary-treasurer of 
Local 12, Communications Workers of America-CIO, Washing- 
ton, D. C., presents a check for $100 to PAC Comptroller George 
Hettinger. The local voted the money to the PAC education fund 
and promised to do a bang-up job in the collection of voluntary 
contributions for PAC, needed now more than ever. 


Conn. Labor Unites 


For 1950 Election 


By HERMAN WOLF 

O RGANIZED labor in Con- 
necticut has united politi- 
cally to wage joint warfare for 
its friends and against its foes 
in the 1950 election. 

That was the big news from 
the Nutmeg State as the Con- 
necticut CIO brought its twelfth 
annual convention to a close at 
New Haven. At a political action 
session, state leaders of the Con- 
necticut Federation of Labor, 
AFL, Inti. Association of Machin- 
ists, United Mine Workers and 
Railroad Brotherhoods joined with 
CIO officials in pledging to build 
a United Labor Committee with 
an eye to next November. 

It was made clear that the 1950 
objective will be to return De- 
mocratic Sens. McMahon and Ben- 
ton and Democratic Reps. Wood- 
house, Ribicoff and McGuire to 
Washington — and, if possible, to 
replace the state’s three Repub- 
lican congressmen with new 
blood. 

Equally important will be the 
re-election of Gov, Chester Bowles 
to the first four-year guberna- 
torial term in the state’s history. 

Sen. Benton, newly appointed 
by Bowles, pledged his energies 
to the repeal of the Taft-Hartley 
Act. 

“My attitude toward the Act is 
simply stated. Congress should 
repeal it,” he said. “The best men 
in labor and industry should sit 
down with Congress to work out 
a new law consistent with the 
basic freedoms both of labor and 
management.” 

Benton, who is a former As- 
sistant Secretary of State, also 
paid tribute to organized labor 
for “showing great realism and 
great responsibility in combatting 
communist tactics.” 


Representing the five labor 
groups at the political action ses- 
sion were Secy.-Treas. Joseph M. 
Rourke of Connecticut AFL; Pres. 
James N. Mulreed, of the state 
council, lAM; Natl. Rep. Peter 
Landino, District 50, UMWA; 
George Snow and John Murphy, 
Brotherhood of Railway Train- 
men and Brotherhood of Firemen 
and Engine men, respectively; 
Pres. Mitchell Sviridoff and Secy.- 
Treas. John Driscoll of the state 
CIO. 

“Real coordination of labor's 
efforts for candidates who are 
friends of labor is essential for 
maximum results in registration 
of voters, use of available cam- 
paign funds and getting out the 
vote election day,” said the joint 
resolution. “It is the sense of this 
conference that a United Labor 
Committee be created at once, and 
we call upon all participating 
unions to take the necessary 
steps.” 

Tlfe CIO convention empowered 
its officers to join in establishing 
the United Labor Committee, and 
the four other labor groups are 
expected to follow with similar 
action. 

Sviridoff and Driscoll were re- 
elected as officers of the state 
CIO without opposition. ^ 

Following a speech by CIO 
Councils Dir. John Brophy, the 
convention passed a resolution 
recommending federal regional 
planning such as TVA to conserve 
national resources and provide 
electricity. 

Other speakers at the conven- 
tion included Roy Reuther, CIO 
Auto Workers PAC coordinator, 
A1 Barkan, PAC Textile Workers 
Director, and Tilford Dudley, as- 
sistant national CIO-PAC Director, 

Ted Silvey, special labor ad- 
visor in ECA, reported on unionSf 
in the Marshall plan countries. 


6 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 



Opponents Square Off For Civil Rights Showdown 



‘‘CEASE STALLING” on FEPC, Congress was 
told by a joint Conference of three CIO unions 
and the CIO Committee to Abolish Discrimina- 
tion. Here are some of the conference leaders: 
Arthur Riordan, lUE-CIQ representative at 
the conference ; Thomas W. Shane, chairman of 
the CIO Steelworkers representatives; Joseph 
Germano, director, steel union’s Dist. 31 and 
president of the Illinois CIO Council; William 
Oliver, co-director of the Auto Workers Fair 
Practices Dept.; CIO Secy.-Treas. James B. 


Carey, chairman of the CIO Committee and 
of the lUE-CIO Administrative Committee; 
Willard Townsend, president of the Transport 
Service Employes and secretary of the CIO 
Committee; Albin Hartnett, lUE representa- 
tive and assistant to Chairman Carey of the 
lUE Administration Committee; Mrs. Lillian 
Hatcher, inti, representative of the UAW Fair 
Practices dept. ; George L-P Weaver, CIO Com- 
mittee director. The three Unions also decided 
to sponsor local civil rights rallies. 


By D. ROCKWELL CLARK 

A SHOWDOWN on civil 
rights loomed on the Con- 
gressional horizon as the elec- 
tion-year session of the 81st 
Congress went into its fourth 
week. 

Brought' into full limelight by 
the three-day meeting in Wash- 
ington of 4037 delegates to the 
National Emergency Civil Riglits 
Mobilization, and given a personal 
send-off by President Truman, 
the issue was Hot enough to give 
off smoke by the end of last week, 
and all indications were that it 
would stay that way right through 
the 1950 campaigns. 

In the House, the Dixiegop co- 
alition on the Rules Committee 
sought to keep the Fair Employ- 
ment Practices Commission bill 
from coming to a vote by mak- 
ing an unashamed power-grab 
which, if successful, would bottle 
up FEPC and most of the Fair 
Deal along with it. 

In the Senate, cynics began try- 
ing to use the civil rights issue 
to thwart Fair Deal legislation, 
through the hoary device of tack- 
ing FEPC on as a “rider,” there- 
by assuring — they hoped — defeat 
of the main legislation by filibus- 
ter. This happened on the oleo 
bill but the attempt was defeated 
when the FEPC amendment was 
tabled. 

President Truman jumped right 
into the middle of the situation 
by telling a group of Mobilization 
delegates that he hoped the Rules 
Committee move would be defeat- 
ed, and that Senate administra- 
tion leaders would meet the is- 
sue head-on and try to break the 
inevitable filibuster on FEPC ‘'if 
it takes all summer.” 

All this took place as .the dele- 
gates to the union-backed, non- 
Communist Mobilization, in large- 
business-like groups, buttonholed 
every Congressman and Senator 
who was in town and put them 
over the jumps on specific issues. 


Delegates from 58 organizations 
in 33 states swarmed over Capitol 
Hill and then gathered in the In- 
terdepartmental Auditorium to 
hear reports. 

T he Mobilization was frankly a 
pressure group, working 
against other pressure groups 
whose purposes were not so hon- 
estly stated, and whose opera- 
tions were not so above-board. 

It was the climax to a series of 
regional meetings. The attend- 
ance was over twice what Mobili- 
zation Chairman Roy Wilkins, 
acting executive secretary of the 
National Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People, had 


Sen. Hoey Sets 
D. C. Paper ‘Right’ 

Sen. Clyde Hoey (D., N. C.) 
was reported recently by a Wash- 
ington, D. C., newspaper as be- 
ing in favor of FEPC legislation. 
The paper printed a correction 
the following day. Sen. Hoey 
said he had consistently opposed 
“all such” civil rights legislation. 


guessed it would be, in spite of 
the fact that nearly 800 would- 
be delegates were turned down 
by the credentials committee. 

(The bouncing came about be- 
cause Mobilization leaders had 
decided as a policy matter that 
no Communists or Communist- 
front organizations would T)e in- 
vited or accepted. This led, ac- 
cording to Willard Townsend, 
president of the CIO Transport 
Service Union and credentials 
committee chairman, to the sub- 
mission of a number of phony 
credentials from persons claim- 
ing to represent NAACP. “We 
may have screened out some in- 
nocents,” he commented, “but 
not many; it is my firm belief 
that the Communists deliberately 
attempted to sabotage this con- 
ference.”) 

Both the Senate flurry and the 
Rules Committee grab occurred 
while the Mobilization was in 
town. More than one Southern 
delegate, shocked by these ma- 
neuvers, told the intensely seri- 
ious audience at the Auditorium 
that Dixie Negroes would redou- 
ble their efforts for repeal of the 
polltax and, in the meantime, 
would work to qualify Southern 
liberals of every race to vote. 

Cheers greeted one Mississippi 
delegate who said: “We knew it 
would be a waste of time to talk 
to our Congressmen, but I tell 
you this: you folks give us the 
ballot and we’ll be the ones 
who'll get you the votes for 
FEPC.” 

About one-third of the dele- 
gates were from CIO and AFL 
unions. CIO officials playing 
an active part included UAW- 


CIO Political Action Coordinator 
Roy Reuther; Regional Director 
Joseph Germano of the Steel- 
workers:, Albin Hartnett of lUE- 
CIO; and George L-P Weaver, di- 
rector of the CIO Committee to 
Abolish Discrimination. 

On Jan. 14, before the Mobiliza- 
tion, the Committee met at CIO 
headquarters. It called on Con- 
gress to “cease stalling and take 
steps to make American democ- 
racy work.” The three big unions 
also pledged to hold a series of 
regional rallies for civil rights. 

The Rules Committee power- 
grab, which dramatized the dif- 
ficulties and pressures surround- 
ing passage of civil rights legis- 
lation as nothing else could have 
done, began while the Mobiliza- 
tion was still in Washington and 
had not been resolved as the CIO 
News went to press. 

■**HE RULES committee serves 
■ as a “traffic cop” in the House; 
it decides when bills reported by 
other committees will reach the 
floor, how long they will be de- 
bated, and whether they may be 
opened for amendments. Until 
last year it also could refuse in- 
definitely to bring a bill to the 
floor. 

At present, the Rules Commit- 
tee can block consideration of a 
measure approved by another 
committee for only three legisla- 
tive weeks, after which the chair- 
man of the committee which ap- 
proved the measure may call it 
up for consideration on “Calendar 
Day” if recognized by the Speak- 
er. 

The legislative 21 days on 
FEPC expire today (Jan. 23). 
Chairman John Lesinski (D., 
Mich.) of the House Labor Com- 
mittee. early in the session noti- 
fied all and sundry that he would 
call the measure up for House 
consideration Jan. 23. 

I T COULD scarcely have been a 
coincidence that the Rules 
Committee majority, led by Rep'. 
Eugene Cox (D., Ga.) and backed 
by all four Republican members 
and three out of the five commit- 
tee “Democrats,” on Jan. 16 voted 
seven to two to- ask the House to 


give it back its old, virtually ab- 
solute, power of sitting on legis- 
lation indefinitely. 

It had this power until last 
year, when the House by a vote 
of 275 to 142, instituted the 21- 
day limit. 

If the power is restored, the 
only way that any portion of the 
Fair Deal program can get past 
the Dixiegops on the Rules Com- 
mittee will be for 218 members 
of the House to sign a petition 
discharging the Rules Committee 
of further consideration of the 
bill in question. This is an exact 
numerical majority of the House, 
but is many more like-minded 
Representatives than can usually 
be found in Washington nt one 
time. 

Effect of such a switch on Le- 
sinki’s efforts to get FEPC to the 
floor could easily be imagined. 
The Capitol is full of legislators 
who find themselves on the hot- 
test political spot they have oc- 
cupied in years, including many 
on both sides of the aisle who 



Bulletin 


The Rules Committee power- 
grab was defeated, 236-183, on 
Jan. 20. This meant the House 
probably would consider FEPC 
on Jan. 23. 

The turn-down followed de- 
feat of a GOP-sponsored motion 
to adjourn the House, which 
went down by 255-160. 



have mouthed easy phrases about 
favoring civil rights and now find 
themselves threatened with a 
record vote on the subject. 

Rep. Adolph J. Sabath (D., 111.), 
venerable Rules Committee chair- 
man, and Rep. Ray Madden (D., 
Ind.), were the only two Rules 
Committee members to vote^ 
against the power-grab. 

CIO Pres. Philip Murray on 
Jan. 19 addressed a letter to 
Sabath, House Speaker Sam Ray- 
burn, and Majority Leader John 
MacCormack (D., Mass.), asking 
them to work vigorously against 
the proposed rules change. “It 
would empower the Rules Com- 
mittee to make a mockery of the 
manifest will of the people and 
in many cases the express will 
of a large majority of Congress,” 
Murray said. 

M eanwhile, House and Sen- 
ate Judiciary Committees 
started hearings on anti-poll-tax 
and anti-lynching legislation, and 
it became evident that, whether 
or not FEPC got before the 
House or Senate at this session, 
there would be a show-down on 
some civil rights measure, no mat- 
ter how hard the politicians might 
sqq^rm. 

The House is in the habit of 
passing the anti-lynching bill, 
least controversial, of the civil 
rights measures; but the very 
threat of floor consideration in 
the Senate has been enough to 
start a filibuter. 

The Senate last year amended 
its rules, ostensibly setting up 
an effective method of closing de- 
bate and thus eliminating fili- 
busters, but actually, in the opin- 
ion of Congressional experts, 
making it even more difficult 
than before to invoke cloture 
(close debate). The change was 
put over by Senate Dixiegops in 
preference to an administration 
sponsored proposal which actual- 
ly would have limited debate. 
Senate majority leader Scott Lu- 
cas has promised to try to get 
cloture oji a civil rights measure 
at this session even if it means 
holding up all other legislation. 



Th© City of Newark, that we hereby request and urge the United States 
Senators and Congressmen from New Jersey to vote for and support legis* 
lotion for 


(a) Abolition of the poll tex as a voting requirement; 

(b) Establishment of s Fair Employment Practice Coinnission; 

(c) Eneotieent of anti-lynching legislation; 

(d) Prohibition of segregation in any transportation 
facilities; 

AND, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that wa .Memorialize the United 
States Senators end Congressmen from New Jersey, to give their full 
aid and support to the Civil Rights program as outlined and raquastad 
by the President of the United States* 

> AND. "be it further RESOLVED, that a certified copy of this 

resolution be forwarded to each of tne United States Senators and 
Congresamen from New Jersey* 



fW, vhMi mml iMMii, I* *• muM, *1 lit* CWf OmI. CwMM «t,«M M* 


NEWARK, N. J., Commissioners on Jan. 11 passed the resolu- 
tion (above) which urged the state’s congressional delegation 
to vote for civil rights bills. At the suggestion of Arthur 
Chapin, N. J. CIO Council’s civil rights director. Commissioner 
Stephen J. Moran — who is also the Council’s executive secretary 
— introduced the resolution. Other cities please copy. 


N 


THE CIO NfiWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 


7 










CIO’s Stand: 


More Security Asked For More Americans 


S HARP increases in benefit 
payments for the aged 
were called for by the CIO 
Committee on Social Security 
last week in a series of rec- 
ommendations for sweeping 
improvements in the social se- 
curity law. 

Top committees urged “univer- 
sal coverage'' under the old age, 
sprvivors and disability programs 
“for all Americans ... so that 
benefits are received as a matter 
of right." 

It proposed new methods of 
computing benefit rates so as to 
give “adequate payments — enough 
for aged workers to live on at an 
American standard." As the first 
and minimum move in that direc- 
tion, it recommended that bene- 
fits be based on the average 
monthly wage in the income- 
earner's best five consecutive 
years, with a ceiling for social 
security tax payments of $4800 
a year. 

“Benefits should equal 50% of 
the first $100 of this average 
monthly wage," said the commit- 
tee through Chairman Emil Rieve, 
“plus 20% of the balance up to 
the total of $400 a month, with 
an additional 1% increment for 
each year of coverage." Rieve is 
president of the Textile Workers. 

A n aged couple which received 
$300 a month income during 
their best five consecutive years 
would, under the CIO program, 
receive a pension of $162 a month 
after 20 years of social security 
coverage, the committee said. The 
least a retired worker could re- 
ceive under the CIO program 
wduld be $50 a month. The most 
would be 80% of the average \ 
monthly wage. 

The Social Security Committee 
also proposed: 


3 Million Over 
65 Incomeless 

The case for increased old age 
pensions and broader social se- 
curity coverage — 

One-third of all Americans 
more than 65 years old, or 3V^ 
million of the 11 million people 
in that age group and not in in- 
stitutions, have no cash income 
whatsoever. 

Half of the remaining 7,500,- 
000 people in 1948 had cash in- 
comes of $806 or less. 

The figures were made public 
by the Census Bureau “in re- 
sponse to interest stimulated by 
the beginning of hearings on leg- 
islation to extend social security 
benefits.” 


1 Liberalization of qualifying re- 
quirements, and a limit to re- 
ductions in benefits because of 
periods of non-coverage. 

^ Permitting women to retire at 
60 instead of 65. 

2 Payments for dependents of 
persons receiving total disabil- 
ity benefits. 

^ Rehabilitation provisions for 
disabled persons, including 
medical aid and vocational train- 
ing. 

g A program of temporary disa- 
bility insurance, along the lines 
suggested by the Truman Ad- 
ministration. 

^ A relief system which will Rer- 
mit people “not merely to sub- 
sist, but to live," including Fed- 
eral grants to the states sufficient 
to give “decent amounts” to all 
cases. 

The Committee also urged 
“broader federal standards to pro- 
vide meeting of relief needs and 
to bring about removal of unnec- 
essary residence requirements 
and liens on property" for recip- 
ients. 


The recommendations were 
made on the eve of the opening 
of hearings by the conservative 
Senate Finance Committee on the 
broader social security bill passed 
by the House at the last session. 
The Senate is due to act this 
session. 

T he first witness before the 
Senate committee was Arthur 
■J. Altmeyer, Commissioner of So- 
cial Security, who among other 
things recommended a program of 
broader coverage that comes very 
close to earlier CIO proposals. 
Altmeyer suggested extending 
coverage to 5% million farm op- 
erators arid farm ’workers and to 
many domestic workers, as the 
CIO has done. He made no men- 
tion of certain professional work- 
ers now excluded but whom the 
CIO feels should be covered. 

He also proposed to liberalize 
eligibility requiremenfs for those 
now past middle age sq they 
would be paid pensions instead 
of relief grants; collection of so- 
cial security taxes on the first 
$4800 of annual earnings, as the 
CIO proposed, instead of the pres- 
ent $3000 or the $3600 provided 
in the House-approved bill. He 
recommended retention of the 1% 
increase in the monthly benefit 
for each year a worker is insured, 
as the CIO suggested, instead of 
the one-half of 1% ' in the House 
bill. 

Altmeyer urged higher benefits 
under a formula which, for in- 
stance, would give a worker earn- 
ing an average of $200 a month 
and continuously employed since 
1937 a monthly benefit of $111 if 
his wife had also reached retire- 
ment age, and $74 if single. 

Some of the increased cost of 
the expanded coverage and in- 
creased benefits would be written 
off, Altmeyer explained, by a re- 
duction in grants to the states for 
relief. He estimated that the cost 


Comparison Of Proposed Benefits After 
20 Years Of Coverage (Single Person) 


Average Mo. Wage 

CIO Proposal 

Present Law 

House Bill 

$100 

$60 

$30 

$55 

150 

72 

36 

60.50 

200 

84' 

42 

66 

250 

96 

48 

71.50 

300 

108 

48 

77 

400 

132 

48 

77 


would be 6% of payrolls if wages 
increase in the next 50 years at 
the rate they increased in the 
past 50 years, or 7.2% of payroll if 


they remain static. The House bill 
in its present form was estimated 
to cost 6.2% figured on a static 
wage level. 


NMU Vote Bars 
CPers As Members 


^HE RANK and file of the 
CIO Natl. Maritime Union 
in a referendum completed 
last week finished up the job 
of polishing off the Commu- 
nists which was started at the 
international convention last 
fall. 

They overwhelmingly approved 
35 amendments to the union con- 
stitution and two propositions 
aimed at denying union member- 
ship to those belonging to Nazi, 
Fascist and Communist organiza- 
tions. They thus gave strong sup- 
port to NMU Pres. Joseph Cur- 
ran in his campaign to rid the 
union of elei^ents which he 
charged had misused it for years. 

The changes were ratified by 
margins of about five to one, with 
22,630 votes cast. 

The first proposition reaffirmed 
the faith of American seamen in 
the United States and what it 
stands for, “and makes it clear 


that we will defend our country 
against any enemy, including the 
Soviet Union.” The proposition 
was the subject of considerable 
debate at the convention but was 
approved by a better than eight 
to one majority with 53 dele- 
gates abstaining. 

The second proposition pro- 
vides that “members of Nazi, 
Fascist, or Communist organiza- 
tions shall not be admitted to 
membership in the union." 

TT WAS opposition to these two 

proposals that led to disturb- 
ances at NMU headquarters in 
New York in November, accord- 
ing to Neal Hanley, NMU national 
secretary, and M. Hadley Stone, 
treasurer. 

“The issue has been real trade 
union democracy," they said, 
“against a subversive, non-demo- 
cratic, totalitarian group working 
under the leadership of a leader 
who refused to work according 
to our constitution." 






AHA ’s Steinberg Old Hand At Fighting Commies In CIO 


W HEN PRES. William Stein- 
berg of the American Ra- 
dio Association filed formal 
charges that 10 CIO unions and 
nine union presidents had con- 
sistently followed the Commu- 
nist Party -line instead of CIO 
policy, he knew he was exposing 
himself to prolonged and vicious 
attacks by the party-liners. 

This knowledge came from 
battles he had had with Com- 
munists in the past. 

Steinberg, 37, a native of New 
York City, knows what can hap- 
pen to a union when its policies 
are dictated by the Communists. 
He is one of the many union 
leaders who have quietly licked 
Communist opposition without 
deserting the principles of mili- 
tant trade unionism. 

Because there has been noth- 
ing in his trade union career 
which could be attacked as 
“strikebreaking” or as “company 
unionism," the Commies' main 
theme song against him is sim- 
ply: “Who is he, anyway? A 
nobody — a Philip Murray 
stooge." 

T he ARA formerly was the 
marine department of the 
American Communications As- 
sociation, which is one of the 
10 unions now facing charges. 
The marine radio operators have 
a long history of militant trade 
unionism. Before the CIO ex- 
isted, the r2vdio operators on 
East and West coasts formed 


two separate independent un- 
ions. 

These merged, and the result- 
ing union was among the first 
to apply for a CIO charter. This 
was granted, and the charter 
increased the union jurisdiction 
to include many new fields. At 
the height of its power, ACA 
claimed approximately 25,000 
members. The marine depart- 
ment carried the brunt of the 
organizing effort, and from 1942 
on, Steinberg held a succession 
of offices in the department. 

“From the very beginning,” 
Steinberg says, “there was one 
internal, fight after another over 
the Communist issue. The ma- 
jority in the marine department 
remained anti-Communist but 
by 1946 the international was 
consistently following the party 
line." 

“We were reluctant to split 
the union," he continues, “but 
the point came when we felt we 
could no longer be represented 
by sqch leadership." The ma- 
rine radio operators, Steinberg 
explains, have “sensitive" jobs 
and those who work in mer- 
chant marine vessels are under 
the direct jurisdiction of the 
Coast Guard. In addition, “we 
felt that the leadership was all 
too willing to sacrifice contract 
gains for political hay-making.” 

A fter a long preliminary 
skirmish within the intei^, 
Rational, the marine depart- 




WILLIAM STEINBERG 

ment, led by Steinberg, conduct- 
ed a referendum on whether to 
disaffiliate entirely. The refer- 
endum carried, and ACA Pres. 
Joseph Selly, for reasons of his 
own, chose not to contest the 
results. In May, 1948, ARA re- 
ceived its CIO charter. 

Pres. Harry Bridges of the 
CIO Longshoremen then started 
on “a campaign of hate and vili- 
fication against ARA," Steinberg 
continues. He flatly accuses 
Bridges of “inciting a secession 
movement" on the West Coast. ' 


“The AFL Electrical Workers 
was chosen as the instrument 
for the raid," he says. The at- 
tempt failed. 

, The ARA now has 70% of its 
jurisdiction organized and un- 
der contract, Steinberg says, 
and runs seven hiring halls. 
“Wq have about everybody ex- 
cept a group of 800 or so who 
revolted against the partyliners 
around 1940 and went AFL." To- 
tal ARA membership now runs 
around 2500. 

y^HILE THE AFL raid was 
going on, ARA was stand- 
ing shoulder to shoulder with 
ILWU in support of the 1948 
maritime strike and was at- 
tempting to negotiate its own 
contracts with the shipowners. 
Before its negotiations were 
concluded. Bridges offered to 
make “a nice package deal for 
the ARA,” consisting of a sim- 
ple renewal with no gains, 
Steinberg says. ARA held out 
over Bridges' objections and 
signed an agreement “which -was 
the finest in the maritime in- 
dustry.” 

“The ACA," Steinberg says, 
“has fallen off to about 5000 
members and is coming apart 
at the seams, and the same 
thing is happening in all the 
other Communist-dominated un- 
ions.” 

Steinberg emphatically does 
not believe in red-baiting for its 
own sake, nor in “the imposi- 


tion of political uniformity. 
Honest judgments as to what is 
proper trade union policy can 
differ . . . My charge is not that 
these unions have differed from 
CIO policy. This, they had a 
right to do, if they honestly be- 
lieved that the policies they ad- 
vocated were the proper ones 
. . . Nor is my charge that the 
policies and activities of these 
unions were always wrong or 
that the policies of tfie CIO 
were always right,” he says. 

CHARGE, rather, is that 
the leadership . . . have 
no loyalty to the CIO or to gem 
uine trade unionism, that they 
use trade unionism and the CIO 
to achieve the purposes of the 
Communist Party, and in ac- 
cordance with that objective, 
they adopt policies and take ac- 
tions solely on the basis that 
those policies and actions will 
serve the interests of the Com- 
munist Party.” 

As for the Commie cry that 
he is just a “Murray stooge," 
picked out of thin air to do the 
:§hatchet job,” Steinberg com- 
ments drily: 

“I volunteered to file these 
c^larges, I was proud to do it, 
and the only time I ever met 
Phil Murray in my life was 
when I went up on the conven- 
tion platform to shake his hand 
after he announced the steel 
settlement." 


8 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 


N 


Mwrray To Acheson: 

UN Recognition 
Is Asked For ICFTU 


CIO Aide On Point Four: 


‘Offer Straight Goods 
With Clean Hands’ 


A REQUEST to help win 
official status at the 
United Nations for the new 
democratic world labor organi- 
zation has been sent by CIO 
Pres. Murray to Sec. of State 
Dean Acheson. 

Application for ^‘consultative 
status” has already been made by 
the new Inti. Confederation of 
Free Trade Unions to Trygve Lie, 
secretary-general of the United 
Nations. It was sent from London 
by J. H. Oldenbroek, who holds a 
similar position with the ICFTU. 

The world labor group seeks to 
win official status as a consulting 
organization to the UN’s Eco- 
nomic & Social Council. That UN 
agency acts on numerous issues 
of general interest to labor or- 
ganizations. The Communist-dom- 
inated World Federation of Trade 
Unions has enjoyed official status 
for the past several years. 
Murray, in his letter to Ache- 


»HE MANAGEMENT represen t- 
■ atives who dominate the 
board of directors of the Passaic, 
N. J., Community Chest were able 
to figure out only one way to 
slash administrative costs when 
last fall’s campaign for funds 
ended up 25% short of the $228,- 
000 goal, according to Pres. Joseph 
A. Smith of the Passaic^ County 
CIO Council, ^ 

‘‘Curiously, the board majority 
can find no possible way to cut 
down expenses except to elimi- 
nate the labor representative,” 
Smith said. 

'The Council is spearheading a 
drive to maintain efficient opera- 
tions even with a depleted budget. 

It is fearful that if management 
regains complete control of Chest 
operations, the importance of the 
central fund raising body will be 
minimized until it becomes ex- 1 
tinct and services not only for 
workers but for all citizens will 
be back on the old hit-or-miss 
basis. , 


son, voiced hope that the U. S. 
delegation to the United Nations 
would support the ICFTU request. 
He said that the ICFTU, “as a 
body accepting principles of free- 
dom and democracy, has a basic 
interest in the activities of the 
Economic & Social Council.” 

Meanwhile, the ICFTU is mov- 
ing ahead with plans for estab- 
lishment of its headquarters at 
Brussels, Belgium. Search for an 
adequate headquarters has already 
started in the Belgian capital, and 
a meeting of an ICFTU executive 
board subcommittee dealing with 
staff and financial problems was 
held there last week. 

Representing the CIO at the 
meeting of the six-man subcom- 
mittee was Elmer Cope, CIO’s Eu- 
ropean representative. 

ICFTU Sec. Gen. Oldenbroek ex- 
pects that the organization will be 
tfperating in full stride by July 1, 
with headquarters established and 
major staff appointments com- 
pleted. 


“We can appreciate the , chaos 
that will result from a multitude 
of fund - raising drives,” said 
Smith. “If the Labor Division is 
eliminated, at the very least it 
will make our efforts to assist in 
raising money a lot tougher. It’s 
tough enough now with one of 
our largest employers. Botany 
Mills, refusing to permit plant 
solicitation.” 

Organized labor in Passaic, Gar- 
field, Wallington and Clifton, 
where the Chest operates, has 
always supported it vigorously, 
but has had representation on 
the board only for the last four 
years. The present board in- 
cludes five labor spokes*men, three 
of them represent the CIO. The 
Labor Division was established 
about two years ago under the 
direction of A1 Wagner, of the 
CIO Shipbuilding Workers, and 
has chalked up a record of 
steadily increasing service to 
working people. Wagner has re- 
signed, effective next month, to 
move out of the city. 


Equal Job 
Insurance In 
States Asked 

III I NEMPLO YMENT insurance 

^ in the U. S., accepted as 
a sound principle and a help 
to our private enterprise econ- 
omy, should be made equally 
effective, with- minimum stand- 
ards set by Congress in all the^ 
48 states of the Union,” Labor 
Secy. Tobin declared in a radio 
debate with Sen. Bricker (R., 
Ohio). 

“This will eliminate the possi- 
bility of individual states leaving 
their laws unchanged at lower 
levels prevalent in some states, 
without taking recognition of the 
increased cost of living that has 
occurred since this law was origi- 
nally written in 1935,” Tobin con- 
tinued. 

“The objective that was set in 
1935 was to give an unemployed 
worker approximately 50% of his 
earning wage. In order to do 
this today, the President’s pro- 
gram proposed to pay about 50%, 
up to $30 a week. In other words, 
if a worker earns over $60 a week 
he will not receive more than $30 
a week insurance. 

“There is one state which still 
has the $15-a-week maximum pay- 
ment authorized in 1936 when the 
state passed its first unemploy- 
ment law. That maximum has 
remained unchanged for 14 years. 
That, gives the average worker in 
that state a maximum which is 
equal to only $8.22 a week in 
purchasing power based on 1939 
costs. 

“After 14 years of experience 
and 14 years of opportunity for 
the states to approach good stand- 
ards, it is sound for the Federal 
Government to establish mini- 
mum standards for the protec- 
tion of the economy and for the 
protection of individual workers.” 

UAW Fights Detroit 
Rise In Transit Fares 

Secy-Treas. Emil Mazey of the 
CIO Auto Workers has protested 
Detroit Mayor Cobo’s plan to in- 
crease transit fares, and proposed 
a citizens’ committee to study the 
problem. He assailed the plan as 
a burden on those least able to 
afford it, while not touching the 
merchants, factory owners and 
other employers “who are the 
greatest beneficiaries of our pub- 
lic transportation system, even 
though they personally do not 
patronize it.” 


A t this hour in the world’s 
history, the House Foreign 
Affairs Committee was told 
Jan. 13 by Donald Montgomery 
for the CIO, '‘we must offer 
straight goods with clean 
hands.” The CIO, he said, sup- 
ports President Truman’s 
Point Four Program to aid 
under-privileged nations to 
grow and prosper. Montgomery 
is a Washington representative 
for the CIO Auto Workers. 

“The fact is,” Montgomery said, 
“that we in the U. S. with all 
our wealth and advantages shall 
not preserve our luxuries, shall 
not preserve our political free- 
dom, indeed may not preserve 
our lives, unless we link our re- 
sources, our capabilities and our 
destiny with all free peoples and 
with all people who want to be 
free.” 

He urged that the President’s 
program “not be set afoot hobbled 
with all the hobbles which the 
slack-visioned masters of high 
fin*ance and big business urge 
upon you. 

“Basically, the Congress is 
compelled to decide whether Point 
Four is an old way of making 
money under a new guise, or is 
a new way of making common 
cause with all^the world’s people.” 


R OILEIN H. EVERETT, execu- 
tive secretary of the Cincin- 
nati Newspaper Guild and a 
f ormqr member of the Cincinnati 
City Council, has agreed to be- 
come a candidate for the Demo- 
cratic nomination for Congress- 
man in the 1st Ohio District. 

Everett, who made his decision 
after being urged to run by Demo- 
cratic, CIO and AFL leaders, ap- 
parently faces no primary opposi- 
tion. The incumbent. Rep. Charles 
Elston (R.), possessor of one of 
the worst voting records in Con- 
gress, from Labor’s standpoint, is 
expected to run again. Everett, 
long a civic leader in Cincinnati, 
served two terms in City Council 
and was defeated for re-election 


The CIO opposes the proposals 
of Rep. Christian Herter (R., 
Mass.) that the program by-pass 
the United Nations, that U. S. cor- 
porations should receive special 
favors in the nations aided, and 
that the program be limited to 
countries struggling against “com- 
munism and other forms of 
statism.” That last word, Mont- 
gomery observed, has been used 
by Republicans to describe Presi- 
dent Truman’s Fair Deal pro- 
gram, as well as the democratic 
socialist program of the British 
government. 

Montgomery called for strength- 
ening the Administration’s Point 
Four bill to encourage systems 
of cooperative credit, and to allow 
aided nations to undertake pro- 
grams of self-improvement inde- 
pendent of U. S. corporations. 

Labor, both in the U. S. and in 
the aided nations, should have a 
voice in the program and steps 
should be taken to insure fair 
labor standards through encour- 
agement of unions and collective 
bargaining in the aided countries, 
the CIO urged. 

Resolutions adopted by the 
Inti. Confederation of free Trade 
Unions at its founding meeting 
in London last November, as well 
as the resolutions voted by the 
CIO’s national convention, were 
cited as grounds for the CIO's 
position. 


last fall largely because of over- 
confidence by his backers. 

Rep. Melvin Price (D.), has an- 
nounced that he will be a candi- 
date for re-election in the 25th 
Illinois district. Price, a World 
War II veteran from East St. 
Louis, is completing his third 
term in Congress. He has always 
shown an active interest in legis- 
lation supported by organized labor 
and, according to the CIO News 
voting guide, cast his ballot 
“right” during the first session of 
the 81st Congress in all measures 
listed. 

Arbitration Tradition 
Viewed Dangerous 


Passaic, N. J., Chest Drops 
Labor Division To Save Money 


Everett To Run For Congress, 
Price Will Seek Re-election 


’^ater ‘Production’ 
Means To Be Sought 

An inquiry into the ways sci- 
ence has found to produce — from 
sea waters and from the clouds 
above the earth — usable water for 
home, irrigation and industrial 
use will take place shortly. Sen. 
Joseph C. O’Mahoney (D., Wyo.) 
announced Jan. 5. 

In view of the acute water 
shortage in the New York metro- 
politan area and the chronic 
shortage in the western section 
of country, O’Mahoney indicated 
that he is pressing for an en- 
larged version of his bill to au- 
thorize Interior Dept, to spend 
up to $50 million to develop prac- 
tical means of producing usable 
water from the ocean. Hearings 
will be before the Senate Interior 
& Insular Affairs Committee, of 
which O’Mahoney is chairman. 

On the initiative of Sen. Sheri- 
dan Downey' (D., Calif.) the 
measure will now authorize the 
Interior Dept, to check the claims 
of scientists that “seeding” rain- 
clouds with minute particles of 
silver iodide will double, triple or 
even quadruple the rainfall. 



REP. FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT is shown here 
talking in his office with a group of CIO Textile 
Worke^rs from Virginia and Alabama. The CIO 
members are part of a delegation of 35 who 
came to Washington last week to attend a 
legislative institute run by their union. Ben 
Segal of the TWUA education department was 


in charge of the group. The delegation sat in 
on House and Senate hearings, attended ses- 
sions of Congress, and visited various Senators 
and Congressmen. Similar groups from other 
parts of the country will come to the Capital 
to attend institutes scheduled this month and 
in February. 


Dangers to the arbitration proc- 
ess from the increasing impor- 
tance being given to precedents 
were cited by Dr. William H. Mc- 
Pherson, of the University of 
Illinois Institute of Labor and In- 
dustrial Relations, in art article 
in the Arbitration Journal. 

If the trend toward follow-the- 
leader is maintained, he warned, 
arbitration will become more 
legalistic, more costly and less 
likely to result in equitable rul- 
ings. Each arbitration case should 
be settled on its own merits and 
within the framework of the par- 
ticular situations, he urged. 

Reporter Gets Award 

Jack Pickering, Detroit Times 
reporter who was tipped off to 
the dynamite Christmas package 
found at headquarters of the CIO 
Auto Workers in Detroit, has been 
given the Distinguished Service 
Medal of the American Veterans 
of World War II (AMVETS), their 
highest award. Pickering, a mem- 
ber of the Detroit Newspaper 
Guild, was honored for outstand- 
ing service to the nation and to 
veterans, particularly for his work 
in behalf of paraplegics. 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 


9 



Secy. Tobin Estimates: 


22 Million Covered By 75c Minimum Law 


By HQLLACE RANSDELL 

B ig posters announcing 
that the hourly minimum 
wage has been increased from 
40c to 75c, effective Jan. 25, 
are now on display — or should 
be — in factories, shops and 
plants all over the country. 

The new posters \tere sent this 
month to 600,000 employers by the 
U. S. Dept, of Labor’s Wage-Hour « 
and Public Contracts Division, 
which administer the Fair Labor 
Standards Act (Wage-Hour law) 
as amended by Congress last 
October. Employers with workers 
subject to the law’s provisions are 
required to display the notices 
“in conspicuous places where such 
workers can readily see them.’’ 

An estimated 1% million work- 
ers will be benefited in a varying 
degree by the new 75c minimum. 
Secy, of Labor Maurice Tobin has 
stated that by far the great num- 
ber of those who will receive di- 
rect pay increases are already 
earning at least 65c an hour. 

Together with the other new 
amendments to the Wage-Hour 
law, which include provisions to 
strengthen the child labor and 
homework provisions, Tobin esti- 
mates that some 22 million work- 
ers engaged in interstate com- 
merce or in the production of 
goods for interstate commerce, 
will be affected. 

F ew CIO members will be bene- 
fited by the new minimum, as 
the union contracts under which 
they work mostly call for wage 
rates well above $1. The CIO, 
however, was a strong supporter 
of the amendment passed, while 
at the same time pointing out 
that it should be higher — at $1, 
the amount called for in the CIO’s 
legislative program. 

The 1% million workers whose 
pay will be brought up to 75c an 
hour starting Jan. 25, are in fact 
but a small proportion of the 
workers throughout the country 
who are getting substandard' 
wages. 

The Federal law covers only 
those who work for concerns en- 
gaged in interstate commerce, or 
who make' goods for interstate 
commerce. Millions of other low- 
paid workers still have no mini- 
mum wage protection, or only 
such minor protection as is of- 


Wage-Hour Law’s Main Points 


Main points of the amended Federal Wage-Hour 
Law are: 

Wage-Hour Coverage: The amended law, as 
formerly, applies to workers engaged in interstate 
commerce or in the production of goods for inter- 
state commerce. Since there was much confusion 
in the past as to whether certain workers should 
be included, the amended act seeks to clarify this. 
It makes the test of coverage for workers not 
actually “engaged in the production of goods” on 
the basis of whether they are engaged in “any 
closely related process or occupation directly 
essential to the production thereof.” 

Minimum Wage: Besides increasing the hourly 
rate from 40c to 75c, the amended act has a defini- 
tion of the regular rate of pay not in the original 
law. It includes all remuneration foi employment 
except overtime premiums and other specified 
payments, such as gifts not dependent on hours 
workers, production or efiiciency (Christmas pres- 
ents, for example). 

Each covered employe must be paid at the rate 
of not less than 75c an hour, whether he is paid by 
the hour, week, month or other basis. William 
McComb, administrator of the law, stated last 
week,>that a wage of, or equivalent to $30 a week 
for a 40-hour week, or a monthly salary of $130 
for work weeks of not less than 40 hours, would be 
in accordance with the law. 

Employes engaged in canning fish and employes 
of carriers by air formerly exempt from both the 
minimum wage and overtime provision, are now 
covered by the minimum pay requirement only. 
A new minimum wage and overtime exemption is 
extended to employes of certain laundries and 
cleaning and repairing concerns. 

The former provision that subminimum rates 
may be paid to messengers, learners, apprentices 
and handicapped workers, after certification, is 
continued with a minor change in respect to 
messengers. 

Overtime Pay: The Wage-Hour law still provides 


for at least time and a half pay for work beyond 
40 a week, but the amendments attempt to clear 
up what payments are to be included — such as 
premiums for Saturday, Sunday and holiday work, 
and bonuses — which are to be excluded in deter- 
mining a worker’s “regular rate” of pay for pur- 
poses of computing work after 40 hours. 

Child Labor: The amendments broaden the 
child-labor provisions (which set a minimum age 
of 16 for general employment and 18 for hazardous 
job) by directly prohibiting employment of boys 
and girls below the minimum age in commerce or 
in the production of goods for commerce — includ- 
ing any closely related occupation or process 
directly essential to such production. 

Retained is the former provision which prohibits 
the shipment or delivery for shipment in inter- 
state commerce of any goods produced in violation 
of the child labor restrictions, but only if within 
30 days prior to removal of goods. 

Exemptions: A number of specific exemptions 
are provided, some retained from the old law, 
some of them new and some changed. Part of 
them give exemption from both the minimum 
wage and overtime terms, others give complete, 
or partial exemption from overtime only. 

The list of exemptions is long. Those barred 
from both minimum wage and overtime include 
salesmen, retail and service concerns, agricultural 
workers, certain canning, packing and processing 
employes, taxi, streetcar and bus operators, cer- 
tain switchboard operators; newspaper delivery 
boys, seamen and others. 

Exempt from overtime only are employes of 
certain railroads, pipelines; certain dairy employes, 
all fish canners, cotton and cottonseed processing, 
and many more. Packers, canners, and others 
engaged in work on perishable fruits and vege- 
tables are exempt from the overtime provision 
up to no more than 14 work-weeks in any one 
calendar year. Certain seasonal workers are par- 
tially exempt from overtime pay for up to 12 
hours in a day or 56 hours in a work-week. 


fered by various state laws. And 
these laws for the most part cover 
only women and minors in speci- 
fied occupations. 

Only five states include men in 
their minimum wage coverage. 
Connecticut, in 1939, was the first 
state to take this action. Four 
other states followed suit in the 
next few years — New York, Rhode 
Island, Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire.; 

A lthough some states have 
improved their traditionally 
low minimum wage rates for 
women in specified occupations, 
such as restaurants, retail stores, 
laundries and dry cleaning firms, 
most of them are still much be- 



low the new 75c federal law 
minimum. 

No state has a general mini- 
mum wage that high, although 
the District of Columbia has a 
weekly minimum of $30, and 
$30.60 for women and minors in 
manufacturing and beauty culture. 

A report released last week by 
the U. S. Women’s Bureau, based 
on a study made of state mini- 
mum wage laws and orders from 
July 1, 1942, to Jan. 1, 1949, shows 
that the majority of the hourly 
minimum wage orders were in 
the 50-59c class in laundries, mer- 
cantile or retail trade, dry clean- 
ing and dyeing establishments. 

New York has the highest rate 
for laundries — $23 a week for 
work up to 40 hours a week — and 
this was laregly due to the pres- 
sure of the CIO Amalgamated 
Clothing Workers’ laundry divi- 
sion, which has been working 
hard to improve the conditions of 
laundry workers. 


Washington, D. C., has the high- 
est weekly rate for retail store 
employes — $25 for a week of 36 
to 44 hours. 

OfiSce workers are now covered 
by the minimum rates in 12 juris- 
dictions, the Women’s Bureau 
states. California has the highest 
hourly minimum for office work- 
ers, 65c, followed by Massachu- 


setts with 60c. Nevada and Ken- 
tucky each have a 50c rate. 

W ISCONSIN is the only state 
which has given special at- 
tention to a notoriously sweated 
group — domestic service workers. 
An order effective in February 
1947 set a minimum of $12 a week 
for women who receivq^board but 
not room in cities of 3500 and 
over; $10.75 for those in towns 
of 1000 to 35(X) population; and 
$10.25 elsewhere. If furnished with 
both board and lodging, the mini- 
mum is from $7 to $8 a week, de- 
pending on the population of the 
locality. 

Another large, poorly - paid 
group, agricultural workers, who 
are excluded from Federal Wage- 
Hour coverage, are given little 
or no attention by state laws: 
Wisconsin, Nevada, Alaska and 
Hawaii have low minimums for 
women agricultural workers only. 
In Wisconsin the rate is 38c an 
hour. 

Puerto Rico covers both men 
and women agricultural workers 
in sugar cane with a daily mini- 
mum ranging from $1.40 to $1.50 
for an eight-hour day. 

H ighest minimums for wom- 
en are found in the manufac- 
turing category, with the District 
of Columbia leading with a $30 
weekly minimum for a workweek 
of 32 to 40 hours. The part-time 
hourly rate for work of less than 
32 hours a week is 8oc, and the 
overtime rate is $1.12 The next 
highest is 65c, in effect in Cali- 
fornia and Oregon. 

But in Arkansas, the minimum 
rate for women in manufacturing 
and other categories is actually 
only $1.25 a day for an eight-hour 
day, six days a week for experi- 
enced workers, and $1 a day for 
inexperienced ! 

Although the analysis of present 
state minimum laws shows some 
progress since the first such law 
was passed by Massachusetts in 
1912, much legislative work re- 
mains to be -done to bring mini- 
mums up even to the 75c pro- 
vided by the federal law. 


Clothing Workers Declare 
War On Chiseling Bosses 


‘‘Only 15c ! Now you know how he stands on the Wage-Hour Law/' 


Information, 

Please! 

The other day the office of 
U. S. Senator Sheridan Downey 
(D., Cal.) called CIO-PAC and' 
the following conversation en- 
sued: 

^ “The California CIO-PAC has 
asked us to supply Senator 
Downey’s voting record for the 
first session of the 81st Congress. 
We don’t have the information. 
Could you supply it?” 

“Certainly, we’d be glad to 
send you the complete record.” 

You wonder why we print 
this? Because it was Downey’s 
office which didn’t have his vot- 
ing record, and PAC which said 
it would be glad to fill the re- 
quest. 


C HISELERS IN a lot of small, 
non-union shops are getting 
ready to resist the new 75c mini- 
mum wage law when it goes into 
effect Jan. 25, warns the Amal- 
gamated Clothing Workers. 

Evidence is mounting, particu- 
larl 3 ^ in the South, reports Ad- 
vance, the union’s official paper, 
that some bosses have giveii their 
workers to understand that they 
have no intention of meeting the 
requirements of the new law. 
One case cited involves a shop 
^ in Alabama where the employer 
held a mass meeting and bluntly 
told the workers that he would 
not increase their wages to meet 
the new minimum. Here’s how he 
plans to do it: 

I NSTEAD OF shipping the fin- 
ished product to a jobber in 
another state as formerly, he will 
ship to an office opened by the 
same jobber in Alabama in the 
hope of avoiding the interstate 
commerce provision of the fed- 
eral wage-hour law. What he 
failed to mention or did not 
know. Advance points out, is that 
the Supreme Court declared this 
dodge illegal in a decision under 
the old 40c minimum wage law. 

A second typical case involves 
the employes of a plant in Vir- 
ginia, who after learning about 


the 75c minimum from an ACW 
pamphlet, went to the boss about 
it. He told them to mind th^r 
own business and furthermore 
said that he had no intention of 
paying the 75c an hour. 

T he union paper reports that 
the Amalgamated is checking 
every report of chiseling and will 
, turn the information over to the 
U. S. Dept, of Labor for investiga- 
tion. “The ACWA intends to see 
that everyone that refuses to pay 
its employes the legal wage will 
be brought to court and pro- 
secuted,” Advance says. 

The speed-up is another device 
some of these smaller, non-union 
shops are imposing on their al- 
ready overworked, underpaid em- 
ployes. 

Advance quotes from a state- 
ment put on the plant bulletin 
board by a Georgia employer 
warning employes: “You are go- 
ing to have to attain 100% produc- 
tion to keep your jobs, and you 
are going to have to diligently 
work practically every minute of 
the 460 minutes given you to at- 
taing 100% production.” 

To help workers fight these 
chiselers, the Amalgamated says 
it is distributing 100,000 pam- 
phlets to carry the story of the 
75c minimum wage to workers in 
unorganized plants. 


10 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 2$, 1950 


N 



Glass Workers Win Pension Plan For 18,500 



NEGOTIATING PENSIONS: Representatives 
of the CIO Glass Workers waiting for the final 
pension proposal of the Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
and Libby-Owens-Ford companies. Seated at 
right center (1. to r.) are Union Counsel Sam 


Rothbard (smoking cigarette), Inti. Union 
Pres. Joseph Froesch and Secy.-Treas. Lewis 
McCracken. Negotiations' took 10 days. Pay- 
ments are $60-$125. (The picture was taken by 
Vice-Pres. Leland Beard.) 


COMPANY-PAID pension 
plaii covering 18,500 em- 
ployes of the two largest con- 
cerns in the flat glass industry 
has just been negotiated by 
the CIO Glass Workers. 

The agreement, reached be- 
tween the Federation of Glass, 
Ceramic, and Silica Sand Workers 
and the Pittsburgh Plate Glass and 
Libby-Owen-Ford companies after 
10 days’ intensive negotiations at 
Atlantic City, N. J., provides pen- 
sions at age 65 ranging from $60 
for 15 years’ service to $125 for 50 
years. Workers with 25 years con- 
tinuous service will receive $100. 

Union officials said that some 
1300 workers employed in six PPG 
and four LOF plants are now 
eligible for pensions under the 
plan. 

B enefits include the 

amount due the worker under 
Federal social security, but pay- 
ments for his dependent wife and 
children are not deductible. The 
union points out that in this re- 
spect the glass workers’ plan is 
an improvement over similar com- 
pany-paid pension systems under 
which additional amounts due for 
dependents under social security 
are also deductible from the 
amounts paid by the company. 

Other main points in the agree- 
ment include: ^ 

VAW Spurns 
Chrysler^s 
5-Year I^act 

T he CIO Auto Workers an- 
nounced last week that 
89,000 members employed by 
Chrysler Corp. would strike 
Jan. 25 unless a satisfactory 
pension plan was offered by 
the company. 

UAW Chrysler Dir. Norman 
Matthews said a plan submitted 
by the company was entirely un- 
acceptable. 

The company had offered, in 
exchange for a five-year contract 
covering non-economic issues, to 
grant a pension plan under which 
it would make up the difference 
between social security benefits 
and $100 a month for workers at 
the age of 65 who ..had 25 years 
service. . 

Matthews said the company’s 
request for a five-year contract 
was “ridiculous.” He asserted the 
workers were unwilling to extend 
the present contract for “five 
minutes, let alone for five years.” 

He called the pension proposal 
itself, “unsound and inadequate,” 
and said the workers demand an 
arrangement “which is financially 
sound and guaranteed.” This re- 
ferred to the company proposal 
that it have complete control over 
the pl^ with no immediate fund- 
ing provisions. 

“The increase in life insurance 
and disability benefits,” Matthews 
continued, “amounts to a cost of 
less than one cent per hour to 
the company and the offer to co- 
operate ‘as in the past’ in the 
medical-hospital program consti- 
tutes no offer on this type of 
coverage since the Chrysler work- 
ers would continue to pay the 
whole cost as they do at the 
present time.” 



Bucks For PAC Are 


Knockout Drops 
To Lick Labor-Hating 
Dixiegops 


• Eligibility for old age retire- 
ment benefits is retroactive to 
May 1, 1949. 

• Payments at age 65 are made 
on the basis of $4 a month for 
each year of continuous service 
up to 25 years. Workers with 
more than 25 years’ service are 
entitled to $1 a month for each 


additional year beyond 25, up to 
50 years. 

• An outstanding point in the 
agreement to which the union 
points with pride is the definition 
of “continuous service.” Under 
this a worker may be absent from 
the plant by leave or layoff up to 
five years without a break in his 
continous service record. 


• Elected union officials on leave 
get full credit indefinitely while 
on official duties. 

• Benefits for non-occupational 
health and accident insurance are 
increased from the former al- 
lowance of $15 a week for 13 
weeks, to $26 for 26 weeks. Hos- 
pital and surgical provisions, to 
apply to varied local plans, are 

Laid-Off Workers 
Win Vacation Pay 

Firestone Textiles, Inc., which 
closed its plant at New Bedford, 
Mass., recently had to dig" down 
for $75,000 in vacation pay for 900 
workers. 

The CIO Textile Workers said 
the award was made without re- 
course to arbitration because the 
company had pulled the same 
stunt last year at another of its 
plants and lost an arbitrators’ de- 
cision at that time. 


increased from $2 to $3 a month 
for a married employe, and from 
$1 to $1.50 for a single worker. 

•. A worker who becomes totally 
disabled after 15 years service, 
before he is 65, will be entitled to 
three-fourths of his pension, with 
benefits readjusted when he 
reaches 70. 

• No worker is forced to retire 
at 65. The company may request 
his retirement only after he 
reaches 70. 

T he agreement becomes ef- 
fective in May 1950, after final 
approval by the stockholders at 
their May meeting. The union has 
already accepted through the 60- 
man committee which negotiated 
the agreement. The committee, 
composed of international union 
officers and committeemen from 
the 10 locals involved, has power 
under the union’s constitution to 
approve the agreement. 

Joseph Froesch, international 
president, called the committee 
together to negotiate with the 
PPG and LOF officials. 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 
plants involved are at Creighton 
and Ford City, Pa., Crystal City, 
Mo., Henryetta, Okla., Mount Ver- 
non, Ohio, and Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Libby-Owen-Ford plants are at 
Toledo and Rossford, Ohio, Ottav/a, 
111., Charleston, W. Va., and 
Shreveport, La. 

105 Areas 
Have 7% Or 
More Jobless 

^HE U. S. BUREAU of Employ- 
■ ment Security has announced 
that the number of areas having 
7% or more of their working force 
unemployed rose to 105 in Decem- 
ber. This ' compared with 99. in 
November. 

The survey shows 33 areas have 
12% or more workers unem- 
ployed. Such areas are classed 
as “E” areas because of their high 
percentage of labor surplus. 

Four new areas were on the 
bureau’s “E” list for December. 
They are San Diego, Cal., Clinton, 
Ind., Washington County, Me., and 
Silver City, N. M. 

Three areas classed as “E” in 
November were dropped from 
the December list. These were 
Ansonia and Waterbury, Conn., 
and Vincennes, Ind. 

Discriqiinatory 
Bequest Rejected 

A bequest of $140,000 for 
scholarships for “American-born” 
students, “Jews and Catholics ex- 
cepted,” has been turned down by 
Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. The 
money was offered by Federick 
F. T. Dumont, former U. S. diplo- 
matic official. 

The action of the college’s board 
of trustees was taken Jan. 4 after 
an original announcement by Dr. 
Ralph C. Hutchinson, president of 
Lafayette, that the first payment 
of the bequest, $13,506, would be 
accepted despite the discrimintory 
bars. 

After the board’s decision. Dr. 
Hutchinson issued a statement 
saying that “the legacy contains 
an inoperative clause discriminat- 
ing against Jews and Catholics. 
The Board has taken action de- 
clining the legacy as containing 
intimations of discrimination 
which are contrary to the history, 
practice and ideals of Lafayette 
College.” 

11 


2 Radio Firms 

The Federal Trade Commission 
has accused a i^adio tube-making 
firm and a radio set-making firm 
of discriminatory practices in the 
price of tubes. The two are Syl- 
vania Electric Products, Inc., de- 
scribed as “one of the largest 
manufacturers of tubes in the 
United States,” and the Philco, 
Corp. of Philadelphia, said to be 
the largest manufacturer of ra- 
dio receiving sets in the United 
States. 

The FTC charged Sylvania 


Face Charges 

granted discriminatory prices to 
Philco and accuses Philco of 
“knowingly inducing and receiv- 
ing discriminatory prices.” The 
FTC charged Sylvania sells tubes 
to some customers, including its 
own authorized distributors, “at 
substantially higher, prices than 
it sells such products of like 
grade and quality to respondent 
Philco.” The effect, the FTC 
charges “may be substantially to 
lessen competition” or to “tend 
to create a monopoly.” 




Organizationally Sneaking 



By ALLAN S. HAYWOOD 

The writer addressed the Ohio CIO Council Con- 
vention in Cincinnati on Saturday, January 14. 

While at the convention the writ- 
er had the opportunity to meet 
with all directors and organizers 
of CIO affiliated unions to lay out 
a program for supporting lUE- 
CIO in its campaign in Ohio. 
These representatives all wel- 
comed the opportunity to assist 
in this campaign. In regard to 
lUE activities, CIO Reg. Dir. 
Robert Davidson was placed in 
charge of the Dayton area, Reg. 
Dir. George DeNucci was placed in charge of the 
section south of Cleveland outside of Dayton. All 
activity north of Cleveland is being handled by CIO 
Reg. Dir. Sam Sponsellor. 

The convention was a great success. This coun- 
cil is doing a wonderful job, and the officers are 
entitled to a great deal of credit for the good tvork 
being done. 

NLRB’s General Counsel Robert Denham is again 
acting in a manner consistent with his past per- 
formances in seeking an injunction against the 
United. Mine Workers, although he is doing nothing 
about the coal operators’ refusal to live up to their 
agreement concerning the UMW pension fund. Den- 
ham’s attack is not only against the UMW but 
against the whole labor movement. 

Assistant Organizational Director R. J. Thomas and 
Reg. Dir. Anthony Federoff have been assigned to 
assist in the organizing drive of lUE-CIO. Brother 
Thomas will be assigned to the GE Plant in Sche- 
nectady, N. Y., to coordinate and direct the activi- 
ties there. He is to work closely with the lUE rep- 
resentatives in the area. Federoff will be assigned 


to the We^inghouse plant in East Pittsburgh, with 
the same set-up there. All CIO unions are called 
upon to render every support to the lUE-CIO to 
help them establish free American trade unionism. 

Reg. Dir. Fullerton Fulton reports that in a rep- 
resentation election held at the Red Wing Pottery, 
Red Wing, Minn., the workers voted as follows: 
208 for CIO Chemical Workers; 201 for the AFL; 3 
neither; 8 challenged. Fulton also reports that in 
a representation election held at the E. B. Sewall 
Manufacturing Co., St. Paul, Minn., the vote was 
as follows: 69 eligible; 47 USA-CIO; 17 lAM; 1 no 
union; 3 challenged. 

Reg. Dir. James J. Leary reports that the CIO 
Textile Workers were victorious in an election at 
the H. & H. Bag Co., Kansas City, Mo. The em- 
ployes voted unanimously for representation by 
TWUA-CIO, which also won a union security elec- 
tion at the Central Bag Co., Kansas City, Mo., by 
a vote of 98 to 34. In both above elections the or- 
ganizational work was handled by Howard Bergs, 
Business Agent for the Textile Workers Joint 
Board, Kansas City, Mo. 

Sub-Reg. Dir. John J. Maurillo reports that in a 
representation election at the Hoffman Packing Co., 
Syracuse, N. Y., the Packinghouse Workers were 
victorious- over the AFL and an independent union. 
The campaign was conducted by Inti. Rep. I.emuel 
Ward of the UPWA-CIO. 

Reg. Dir. Joseph Walsh reports in a Pennsylvania 
Labor Relations Board election, building service em- 
ployes at the Medical Arts Building, Scranton, Pa., 
voted 16 to 2 for Local 497, Building Service Union, 
RWSDU-CIO. Although they have been on strike 
nine weeks, employes of the Penn-Hadley niills, 
Scranton, who are members of the CIO Textile 
Workers, voted 109 to 6 for a union shop. TWUA- 
Rep. Sam Fiore and Elwood Taub directed the cam- 
paign. 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 




CIO Asks Denham Ouster, Offers Aid To UMW 


T wice within a week NLRB 
General Counsel Robert N. 
Denham, the big injunction and 
lawsuit man, edged a little far- 
ther along the limb he has 
been climbing. 

Twice the CIO whipped out its 
trusty saw and cut another notch 
behind him. 

Last week Denham went into 
the U. S. District Court in Wash- 
ington and under Taft-Hartley 
asked for an injunction restrain- 
ing the United Mine Workers 
from enforcing the three-day 
week UMW members have been 
working in their part-time strike. 

A few days earlier he undercut 
the NLRB itself by openly invit- 
ing employers who don’t like 
board decisions to take them to 
the courts. 

CIO Pres. Philip Murray 
promptly teed off on both occa- 
sions. And even Sen. Robert A. 
Taft (R., Ohio), co-sponsor of T-H, 
joined in the punching when Den- 
ham asked the court to send the 
miners back to work full time. 

Denham’s court action was based 
on the mine operators’ charges 
that the UMW has violated T-H 
by refusing to bargain in good 
faith and with using the three- 
day work week as a “club” to 
force an “illegal” contract on the 
industry. 


On the same day NLRB’s Balti- 
more region office issued a com- 
plaint charging the UMW with 
violating T-H by a series of un- 
fair labor practices. 

Specificaly, Denham asked the 
court, until the complaint is 
settled, for an order stopping the 
UMW from s.eeking an allegedly 
illegal union shop provision, a 
clause allowing members to work 
only when “able and willing,” and 
a ‘welfare fund paying benefits 
only to UMW members. He also 
asked that the UMW be barred 
from ordering or even allowing 
members to participate in any 
“strike, work stoppage and/or con- 
certed refusal to perform services” 
for the coal operators in support 
of alleged illegal demands. 

■ ■THE CIO vigorously protests 
■ the action of General Counsel 
Denham in instituting a com- 
plaint and in filing injunction pro- 
ceedings against the UMW,” said 
Murray. “By this action, Denham 
is again demonstrating his anti- 
labor bias and prejudice. 

“In the proceedings against the 
• UMW, Denham is seeking to en- 
join a work stoppage which is 
entirely lawful under the express 
provisions of the last collective 
bargaining agreement negotiated 
between y the coal operators and 
the mine workers union. 

“There is no legal support 
for Denham’s assertion that it 
is unlawful for the miners’ 
union to again request in c(^lec- 
tive bargaining the renewal of 
such provisions. Employers have 
traditionally retained the legal 
right to shut down thejr proper- 
ties for economic reasons. A union 
certainly may equally assert its 



ROBERT N. DENHAM 


Lambasted by Murray 

economic rights without being 
subject to injunction proceedings. 

“In this attack upon the United 
Mine Workers of America through 
the instrumentality of the evil 
Taft-Hartley Law, Denham is 
challenging the legitimate rights 
and interests of all of organized 
labor. I have instructed the Gen- 
eral Counsel of the CIO to lend 
all possible assistance to the legal 
staff of the United Mine Workers 
in support of the basic labor prin- 
ciples involved and in opposition 
to the proceedings instituted by 
Denham.” 

T aft moved into his attack 
on Denham with deceptive 
mildness, describing the injunc- 
tion move as “unfortunate.” 

“I don’t think,” he said, “that 
the Taft-Hartley Law intended to 
give the^board the right to seek 


a temporary injunction against 
a strike when there is no contract 
and when a legitimate difference 
of opinion exists on wages and 
welfare fund payments, even if 
there are other demands which 
are illegal. 

“We didn’t intend to give any 
one the right to send people back 
to work — except when there’s a 
national emergency — when no 
contract exists.” 

The T-H act gives this right 
only to the President, Taft 
pointed out. The law might pos- 
sibly be “stretched” to cover Den- 
ham’s action, he conceded, but 
added that “I can’t see that it 
would be an effective means of 
restoring the full production of 
coal.” 

T he district Court set Jan. 

26 for a hearing. Taft pre- 
dicted Denham will come out of 
it without his injunction. But 
even if it should be granted, the 
miners could still strike as they 
wished for objectives that are not 
allegedly “illegal,” such as higher 
wages. 

Denham’s advice to employers 
to clutter up the courts with their 
appeals if they don’t like NLRB 
decisions was given in a speech 
in New York during a bitter at- 
tack on board members. 

Murray charged Denham’s state- 
ment “again demonstrated his 
anti-labor bias and his unfitness 
for office.” 

“This invitation, coming from 
the man who by law is charged 
with the duty of defending the 
Labor Board and its decisions in 
the courts,” he continued, “is suf- 
ficient proof (if any additional 
proof is needed) that Denham is 


incapable of administering the im- 
portant post of General Counsel 
of the Board with the fairness and 
impartiality that office requires. 

“Denham’s unseemly attack on 
-the Board arises from the fact 
that the Board in a few cases has 
manifested some degree of inde- 
pendence and has disagreed with 
Denham’s biased and prejudiced 
interpretations of the Taft-Hart- 
ley Act. . 

^‘During the CIO Convention, I 
issued a statement calling upon 
President Ti'uman to remove Den- 
ham as General Counsel of the 
NLRB. The President possesses 
ample power to take this action. 
This latest intemperate statement 
by the Board's General Counsel 
demonstrates that his removal is 
long overdue.” 

Pres. Joseph A. Beirne, of the 
Communications Workers, also 
rapped Denham and urged the 
President to remove him from 
office. 

“Employers need no such en- 
couragement from Denham,” he 
said. 

He recalled instances where 
Denham’s pro - management ac- 
tions had caused serious delays in 
CWA cases before the NLRB. 

“CWA called on President Tru- 
man to remove Denham from his 
job "because of his inability to re- 
main impartial and an obvious 
leaning toward management in 
his decisions,” said Beirne. 

“We renew this request for his 
removal now that he has finally 
brought his pro-management bias 
out into the open. A man who 
openly espouses the cause of man- 
agement in labor disputes does 
not belong in a position like Den- 
ham’s.” 


UOPWA Request For Stay 


FTC Finds Radio 
Kits “^Deceptive’ 

An individual would have to 
be very smart indeed, according 
to the Federal Trade Commission, 
to put together a radio set that 
actually works from one of the 
kits sold by Radio Kits, Inc., a 
New York concern. 

In fact, FTC says, in an order 
prohibiting further manufacture 
of the kits, if the purchaser fol- 
lows the diagrams and instruc- 
tions included he will be very 
fortunate to wind up with a con- 
traption which even slightly re- 
sembles a radio. 

The Commission found that 
“there are many persons who 
cannot, without assistance from 
trained radio technicians, build 
complete radio sets from these 
kits.” 

The advertising claims of the 
company were characterized as 
“deceptive” by FTC. 

Organizer Unhurt 
As His Auto Burns 

Emil Luter, CIO Woodworkers 
staff representative in the South- 
ern States, has a reputation as a 
red hot organizer who is used to 
burning up the road as he speeds 
from one assignment to another. 

Now he has burned up his car 
and his belongings, as well. 

He and Mrs. Luter were nearing 
Nashville, Tenn., after a recent 
trip from Louisville, Ky., when 
their car suddenly burst into 
flames. They were barely able t» 
get out safely and had no chance 
to save their baggage before the 
car and its contents were de- 
stroyed. Gasoline from a hole 
knocked in the tank by some 
metal object had caught fire. 


A n office & Professional 
Workers demand for a 
temporary restraining order 
against the CIO’s investiga- 
tion of charges of Communist 
domination in that union, was 
flatly turned down last week in 
U. S. District Court. 

Judge Burnita Matthews, hear- 
ing the case in Washington, re- 
fused the request during the 
course of a two-and-a-half-hour 
hearing. 

The woman jurist, appointed to 
the court during recent months, 
took under consideration a motion 
by Arthur J. Goldberg, CIO gen- 
eral counsel, to dismiss another 
UOPWA plea for an injunction 
against the CIO. He voiced sharp 
opposition to the demands for 
both the short-run restraining or- 
der and the injunction. 

Hearings on charges against the 
UOPWA were held last month by 
a three-man CIO committee. The 
committee is scheduled to report 
its findings to the next meeting 
of the CIO’s 50-member executive 
board. 


Hartley, Goldberg 
To Debate T-H 

What should be a lively de- 
bate on Taft-Hartley takes place 
on the CBS network’s People’s 
Platform show, Sunday, Jan. 29, 
at 12:30 P.M., eastern time. 

The subject: Should Taft- 
Hartley Be Repealed? 

The speakers : ( 1 ) Ex-Rep. 

Fred Hartley, a co-sponsor of 
T-H; (2) Arthur J. Goldberg, 
CIO general counsel. 

Dwight Cooke, outstanding dis- 
cussion moderator, will preside 
over the show. 


The next CIO Board meeting is 
scheduled for Feb. 14. 

No court order has yet been 
granted to hold up CIO’s pro- 
ceedings against four out of 10 
unions accused of following Com- 
munist policies rather than those 
of the CIO. UOPWA has filed an 
injunction petition in New York, 
as well as in Washington. Another 
plea for a sweeping injunction 
against CIO has also been filed in 
New York by the Food, Tobacco 
& Agricultural Workers. 

Court hearings on both these 
petitions have already been held, 
with decisions expected perhaps 
before Feb. 1. 

Meanwhile the fourth, in the 
CIO’s hearings on charges of Com- 
munist domination was held in 
the case of the Inti. Union of 
Mine-Mill & Smelter Workers. 

I N THE* HEARING— held in the 
Board Room at CIO headquar- 
ters — were three of the union’s 
top officers and some 25 or 30 
Mine-Mill members. Pres. John 
Clark, Sec.-Treas. Maurice Travis 
and Vice-Pres. Reid Robinson led 
the Mine Mill delegation. 

Pres. William Steinberg of the 
American Radio Association — who 
filed the original charges against 
Mine-Mill and nine other left- 
wing unions — said he had pre- 
sented a statement accusing the 
union’s leadership of close and 
constant adherence to Communist 
policies, f 

Stanley Ruttenberg, ' CIO re- 
search director, filed in the record 
a batch of photostats of various 
issues of the union’s papers, and 
charged that they reflected vari- 
ous twists and turns in CJommu- 
nist policy. Ken Eckert and Homer 
Wilson, both former officials of 
the union, were said to have of- 
fered a mass of evidence to show 
how Communist party officials, 
within and without the union, had 


directed its policies and activities. 

The Mine-Mill hearing opened 
on Wednesday, Jan. 18, and lasted 
until noon on Jan. 19. It then re- 
cessed until Monday, Feb. 6. 

The hearing committee con- 


A RANK and file committee 
to support Pres. Morris 
Pizer in his fight to line up the 
United Furniture Workers in 
support of the National CIO 
was organized by leaders who 
are reported to represent 70% 
of the union’s voting strength. 
The committee was set up at 
a recent meeting in Chicago. 

Expressed sentiment from 
other locals indicates that about 
90% of the membership is behind 
Pizer and the general executive 
board rfiinority in their battle 
against anti-CIO forces within 
the international led by Secy.- 
Treas. Max Perlow and Organiza- 
tion Director Ernest Marsh, ac- 
cording to William Gilbert. Be- 
fore being ousted by Marsh, Gil- 
bert was the union’s midwest di- 
rector. 

Most of those attending the 
caucus came from the Middle 
West, but leaders of locals in 
other parts of the country also at- 
tended, Gilbert said. 

They unanimously approved a 
resolution calling for full support 
of Pizer “for his fight to keep our 
union in CIO and for supporting 
National CIO” Gilbert reported. 
They demanded a “democratic un- 
ion,” indicated they were “de- 
termined to fight” against domi- 


Rej ected 

sisted of Pres. Jacob Potofsky of 
the Amalgamated Clothing Work- 
ers, chairman; Pres. Joseph Cur- 
ran of the Natl. Maritime Union; 
and Sec.-Treas. Emil Mazey of the 
United Auto Workers. 


nation “by any clique or political 
party in our union,” and pledged 
themselves “to win our fight by 
such an overwhelming' majority 
that we will come out of our next 
international convention in June 
as a united union and as a strong 
part of the CIO.” 

Thomas Binnall, Gardner, Mass., 
was elected chairman of a broad 
“UFWA Rank and File Commit- 
tee for CIO.” Jack Hochstadt, 
New York, was named secretary 
and Sam Sloan, Chicago, treas- 
urer. 

Following the caucus meeting, 
qfficers of the union’s Il^hois- 
Wisconsin^ District elected Gilbert 
district representative and organ- 
izer, and gave him authority to 
assist all other districts in the 
midwest region. 

At the December meeting of 
the UFW general executive board 
in New York, the left-wing major- 
ity rejected by a 14 to 10 vote a 
resolution supporting National 
CIO policy, despite a fight led by 
Pizer. The UFW president said 
the majority ousted one pro-CIO 
member on a technicality and re- 
fused to seat another. 

The UFW is one of the inter- 
national unions cited to appear 
before a CIO hearing committee 
on charges of having consistently 
followed the Communist Party 
line. 


Furniture Workers 
Set Up Pro-CIO Unit 


12 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1950 


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iVol. XIII 


WASHINGTON, D. C.. JANUARY 30, 1950 


No. 5 


✓ 


V CIO OIL WORKERS in Hammond, Ind. borrowed a voting 
i- machine from the county clerk and brought it to their Labor 
i- Day picnic, to demonstrate its operation. It proved so popular 
' that they kept it at Oil Workers Hall till Jan. 24. A sign above 


the “voting booth” read: “Believe it or not, this sinlple machine, 
properly used, can settle many of the specific problems of labor.” 
Officers of several other CIO locals held classes in voting-ma- 
chine operation, too. (See PAG story, pages 6 and 7.) 




Murray Revokes California Council Char 


T he certificate of af- 
filiation of the Commu- 
nist-dominated California 
State Industrial Union Coun- 
cil was revoked last week by 
CIO Pres. Phy Murray. 

Pres. Murray acted on the 
unanimous recommendation of a 
three-man committee which held 
a hearing on Dec. 19, 1949, and 
found the Council guilty of 
charges, filed Iasi October, that 
it followed the Communist Party 
line and actively opposed national 
CIO policy. 

The charter revocation was the 
first since the CIO Executive 
Board adopted rules last No- 
vember permitting the president 
to revoke certificates of affiliation 
of state or local councils, subject 
to appeal to the Executive Board. 

Previously he could only take 
custody of funds or property after 
the filing of charges, with the de- 
cision on revocation left to the 
Executive Board. 

. Under this procedure, the char- 
ter of the old Greater New' York 
CIO Council w^as revoked on 
charges of failing to follow na- 
tional CIO policy. A charter was 
issued to a right-wing group of 
unions. 

The three-man committee which 
heard the charges against the 
California Council found that it; 
Wilfully and repeatedly de- 
* fied and opposed CIO policy. 
I <2 Publicly allied itself with 
* the political program of the 
Communist Party. 
Recklessly interfered, 
* through its officers and em- 
ployees, in the affairs of 
CIO affiliated local and in- 
ternational unions. 








THE LETTERS "‘CIO” once dominated this sign, at the entrance 
of the offices of Local 17 of the Longshoremen and Warehouse- 
men’s union at Sacramento, Cal. The sign now carries no 
reference to CIO. (The International Union of which the local 
is a part has been charged with Communist domination and 
faces possible expulsion from the CIO). 


Utilized its official organ, 
* the Labor Herald, to villify 
CIO representatives, oppose 
CIO policy and to create 
disunity, division and dis- 


ruption within the CIO 
throughout the state, all to 
the disrepute and injury of 
the CIO.” 

The CIO president’s action was 


Aid Is Pledged CWA 
Dispute With Bell 


A QUARTER million CIO 
Communications Workers 
are preparing for a possible 
strike against the Bell System, 
the world’s largest single cor- 
poration and largest private 
employer. 

In reply to a letter from CWA 
Pres. Joseph Beirne, CIO Pres. 
Philip Murray pledged “every pos- 
sible assistance” to the telephone 
workers in their dispute with the 
Bell companies. 

Murray said the “decision as to 
whether there will be peaceful 
labor management relations in the 
telephone industry is clearly one 
that rests with the management 
of the Bell system. 

*T am sure that I speak not only 
for the membership of the CIO 
but for the public at large when 
I call upon this corporation to 
measure up to its public respon- 
sibilities, and, through the proces- 
ses of collective bargaining, con- 


clude a settlement with the Com- 
munications Workers of America.” 

(A CWA booklet which was issued 
last w'eek explained: “The Bell Sys- 
tem consists of the American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co., 21 subsidiary 
operating companies, the Western 
Electric Co., the manufacturing 
branch of the business, and the Bell 
Telephone Laboratories. 

(“AT&T has a two-fold function. 
It is a holding company, financing 
the activities of its subsidiary com- 
panies and its own activities, and it 
is an operating unit for handling 
long distance communications.”) 
^EIBNE said in his letter that 
the Bell System has turned 
deaf ear to CWA proposals for a 
wage increase, shortening of ap- 
prentice periods, narrowing of 
geographical wage differentials, 
pension reforms and a shorter 
work-week. 

He stated that the weekly wages 
of telephone .workers had fallen 
from seventh place in 1939 among 
the major groups of American 




Murray To Back Phone 
Workers In Radio Speech 

CIO Pres. Murray will deliver a nationwide radio speech Wednesday 
night, Feb. 1, in support of the CIO Communications Workers’ demands 
for higher wages, improved pensions and better working conditions 
throughout the Bell Telephone System. 

Murray will be heard On Wednesday night over some 130 stations 
of the American Broadcasting Co. (ABC) network. 

His speech will be carried at 9:30 P.M., Eastern time, 8:30 P.M., 
central time; 8:30 P.M., mountain time; and 9:00 P.M., Pacific time. 

IBe sure to tune in on your local ABC station for this important 
speech by Pres. Murray. 


wage earners to 25th in 1949. 

CWA is dealing with an em- 
ployer whose conception of labor 
relations belongs back in the days 
of slavery,” Beirne said. 

Beirne urged CIO members and 
the general public “to use the 
telephone as much as possible” if 
the strike is called “so that un- 
attended equipment will develop 
mechanical trouble more speedily 
than when we are there to main- 
tain it.” 

Beirne, in Cincinnati for a meet- 
ving with local presidents from 
over the nation, said he spent an 
hour on Jan. 25 discussing the 
situation by telephone with Wil- 
liam Margolis, in Washington. 
Margolis is an aide to Cyrus 
Ching, head of the mediation serv- 
ice. 

AT&T indicated it would at- 
tempt to continue operations 
through its telephone - operating 
subsidiaries throughout the coun- 
try if the strike is called. , 

$108,000 Asked For 
Labor Relations Probe 

The Senate Labor Committee 
has voted unanimously to ask the 
Senate for a $108,CKX) fund to 
carry on an investigation of labor- 
management relations, in prepa- 
ration of a report due in Decem- 
ber, 1950. Meeting Jan. 20, the 
Senators okayed the proposal, 
brought in by the subcommittee 
headed by Sen. James Murray (D., 
Mont.). 


made known in a letter addressed 
to James L. Daugherty and 
Bjorne Hailing, president and 
secretary-treasurer, respectively, 
of the California Council. 

He advised the Council that un- 
der CIO rules, it 'may appeal his 
action to the next meeting of the 
CIO Executive Board, scheduled 
to be held in Washington on Feb. 
14-15. 

T he committee which heard 
the charges consisted of Allan 
S. Haywood, CIO vice-president 
and director of organization; John 
Brophy, CIO director of indus- 
trial union councils; and John J. 
Moran, vice-president and direc- 
tor of organization, CIO Com- 
munications Workers. 

At the same time, Murray des- 
ignated Richard Leonard, a CIO 
national representative, to take 
over the property and funds of 
the Council in accordance with 
CIO rules. Leonard is a for- 
mer vice-president of the Auto . 
Workers. 

He also called upon Leonard to 
contact a new advisory ^committee 
of. 19 CIO union leaders in Cali- 
fornia for the purpose of estab- 
lishing a new State Council 
“which will work in the interests 
of California CIO members and 
in conformity with the policies 
and principles of CIO.” 

The CIO hearing committee was 
set up in response to charges filed 
by more than a dozen CIO union 
officials in California who asked 
revocation of the Council’s char- 
ter and establishment in a new 
statewide CIO agency. 

No officers or representatives of 
the Council appeared at the com- 
mittee’s hearing in Washington, 
although invited, but a number 
of the complainants testified and 
offered documentary evidence in 
support of their charges. 

The committee in its report de- 
clared : 

“We are compelled to agree that 
the California State Council, as 
charged, is guilty of promoting 
disunity and discord within our 
ranks by its disruptive and irre- 
sponsible actions, and by its di- 
visive tactics has given aid and 
comfort to the enemies of labor 
who perpetually seek our destruc- 
tion. 

“The California Council and its 
officers, on the basis of the rec- 
ord, have repeatedly violated the 
rules established by the CIO Ex- 
ecutive Board and the CIO consti- 
tutional conventions, and which 
were in effect during 1948 and 
1949, during the time covered by 
the complaint.” 

The committee said that the 
Council had “repeatedly publicly 
defied CIO policy.” It held that 
this was in violation of rules pro- 
viding that state and local ihdus- 
trial union cocuncils “shall con- • 
fine their activities and state- 
ments to issues of local or state 
concern, and to matters of gen- 
eral policy that haye been passed 
upon by the national CIO. Coun- 
cils shall take no action or issue 
statements in conflict with CIO 
policy.” 

The committee likewise charged 


/'OJ. 

h failure 
-aided by 


the California group v 
to consult with and b' 
the advice of the CTO ni^-ional of- 
to CIO 
of pro- 


fice in cases of doubt 
policy, or on probl 
cedure and structure. 

The committee com:- Ued that 
“the record shows tha; the Cali- 
fornia Council not or^;'' did not 
consult and be guided the na- 
tional CIO, but ignored and defied 
advice given them bj'^ lb" national 
CIO, and made public a 
the national CIO and 

The complaint 
charges: that Council ' 
numerous occasions” ii 
the internal affairs of Iv 
and attempted to 


ack upon 
officers.” 
•'^ted 10 
cers “on 
fered in 
. Hi unions 
urn them 
against their parent national 
unions; that Council ( f leers at- 
tacked officers of the C' ■ Workers 
Inti. Union during a 1948 state- 
wide oil strike; that a Council of- 
ficial sought to persur ’ ' locals of 
the Steelworkers to ignore that 
union’s national policies 

Also, that the Council and its 
paper openly encouraged workers 
to leave the CIO Ulili^v Workers 
and join the AFL union; that the 
Council “was closely allied” with 
the Communist Party in attempt- 
ing to defeat liberal car (' dates in 
the 1948 election thror- ' the in- 
strumentality of tlv Wallace 
third party; that Coun- 1 officers 
have endorsed and ur--ed sub- 
scriptions to the '^munist 
People’s World, desc^ d as a 
“union-busting, stri -breaking 
rag”; that the Coun ' encour- 
aged opposition to the "uropean 
Recovery Program, in d dance of 
national CIO policy. 

Also, that the Conned has dis- 
tributed literature attn/'k’ng CIO 
policies and slandering CIO offi- 
cials; that Council offi '^rs have 
•refused to account for frnds col- 
lected and spent for political ac- 
tion; and that through these ac- 
tions the Council has ropeatedly 
violated the CIO ConsiiWtion and 
its rules governing local and state 
councils. 

Named by Pres. Murray to con- 
stitute an Advisory Committee to 
make plans, in conjunction with 
Leonard, for establishment of a 
new Council were: 

Timothy Flynn, CIO regional 
director, northern California; Ir- 
win deShetler, CIO regional direc- 
tor, southern California; Charles 
Armin, Oil Workers; Arthur Mor- 
rison, Packinghouse Workers; Ma- 
rie A. DeMartini, Communications 
Workers; Morris Zusman, direc- 
tor, California Natl. CIO-Political 
Action Committee; Jerome Pos- 
ner, Clothing Workers. 

Also John Despol, secretary*^ 
treasurer, California Natl. CIO- 
PAC; C. V. O’Halloran, Auto 
Workers; Floyd Gartrell, Rubber 
Workers; Robert Greenock, News- 
paper Guild; Harold Shapiro, 
Shipbuilding Workers; Philip 
O’Rourke, American Radio Asso- 
ciation; Joe Clark, Woodworkers; 
Charles Smith, Steelworkers; 
Charles Abar, Natl. Maritime 
Union; Harry Stillman, Textile 
Workers; Clement J. Lewis, Utili- 
ty Workers; and Albert Lunce- 
ford, Greater Los Angeles CIO 
Council. 


Unscramble Egg Dispnte; 
Do You Find Middleman? 

Everybody, or practically everybody, was complaining about the 
price of eggs last week. 

The farmers said it was too low. Housewives and the Senate Agri- 
culture Committee said it was too high. The middlemen haven’t been 
heard from. 

The Senate committee was told retail prices were still too high 
even though they are 20 to 30c a dozen lower than last fall’s top. Rep. 
James I. Dolliver (R., la.) said Midwest farmers are receiving 20c and 
even less per dozen. Sen. George D. Aiken (R., Vt.), a committee 
member, reported New England farmers were being paid 23c for eggs 
that sell around 65c at retail. It costs the farmers more to produce the 
eggs than they get for them, he said. 


^ THE CTO NEWS, JANUARY 30, 1950 


N 


UAW Strikes A fter Chrysler 
Spurns Three Proposals 



E ighty-nine thousand 
members of the CIO Auto 
Workers employed by Chrysler 
Corp. went on strike Jan. 27, 
halting the assembly lines of 
the nation’s third largest auto- 
mobile manufacturer in a dis- 
pute over pensions. 

Six months of negotiations 
failed to bring agreement in a dis- 
pute between the union and the 
company. 

UAW Pres. Walter Reuther 
blamed the strike on ^“the arro- 
gant and stubborn attitude of the 
Chrysler Corp.,” and accused the 
company of “refusing to accept 
its responsibilities to its workers 
and the people of the community.” 

He declared the UAW had been 
prepared to call off the strike if 
the company had met the estab- 
lished pattern of 10c an hour — 
either in the form of: j 

Six cents for pensions and 4c 
for a hospital-medical program, 
Or in some other combination 
which would provide Chrysler 
workers with a guaranteed, ade- 
quate pension plan and a hos- 
pital-medical program, 

Or a flat wage increase of 10c 
an hour. 

Reuther said the union had of- 
fered to arbitrate any technical 
problems unresolved after 30 days 
of additional negotiations but 
that the company had turned 
down the proposal outright. 

The UAW president listed nine 
major points which he said made 
the company proposal unaccept- 
able to the union: 

I Despite the highest profits in 
its history, Chrysler Corp. re- 
fused to meet the lOc-an-hour 
economic pattern which has 
been accepted by a large por- . 
tion of American industry. 

2 The company-proposed pension 
plan would cost less than 3c 
an hour. 

2 No provision is made for a 
trust fund under the plan. Also 
no provision is made for set- 
ting aside earmarked funds to 
guarantee payment of pension 
benefits. 

^ The company can cancel the 
plan after five years and the 
worker who reaches age 65 
even one day after date of can- 
cellation receives no benefits, 
g Eligibility rules are rigged 
with numerous “jokers” which 
would deprive thousands of 
workers with long years of 
service of any pension bene- 
fits. 

g The corporation's proposal de- 
nies the workers any voice in 
the administration of the plan, 
jr The company insists on forced 
retirement regardless of the 
individual’s wishes, 
g The company proposal makes 
no provision for company pay- 


WOMEN MEMBERS of the CIO Auto Workers (above) sing as 
they picket the Dodge plant, Detroit, on the first day of the 
nation-wide Chrysler strike. The sign being carried by the young 
woman in the foreground refers to Herman L. Weckler, Chrysler 
vice president and general manager. 


ment of hospital and medical 
benefits for workers and their 
families and provides only 
minor improvements on life 
and disability insurance at a 
cost of less than Ic an hour, 
p The company offers its inade- 
quate and unsound proposal 
conditioned upon the union's 
extending the present collec- 
tive bargaining agreement for 
a period of five years. 

On Jan. 17 the company made 
public its initial offer. It was a 
plan providing that workers could 
retire on $100 monthly, including 
social security, at age 65, after 
25 years of service. The company 
demanded complete control of the 
plan. 

Later the union solidified its de- 
mands into a 10c package and 
made a surprise offer to take a 
wage raise instead of the pen- 
sions. 

UAW had insisted that a defi- 
nite figure for hourly payments 
be included in the contract. The 
company termed this impossible. 

As the strike got under way in 
Chrysler's 14 Detroit plants, soup 
kitchens were rolled out for the 
pickets, and lines of marching 
workers carried placards pro- 


^Texas Bill’ Goes On Air 
For CIO In Dixie 

“Texas Bill” Strength is working for the CIO down in Dixie now. 

He’s featured weekly on his popular program of folk songs, broad- 
cast by the CIO Organizing Committee over radio stations in seven 
states. 

His debut as CIO entertainer was on Sunday, Jan. 22. 

The program, originating at Station WGST in Atlanta, is carried 
on a network in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina, 
Tennessee and Virginia. It also is heard in many parts of Texas. 

George Baldanzi, Organizing Committee director and executive vice 
president of the Textile Workers union, appears briefly on each of the 
programs, discussing the problems of Southern workers. 

“Strength already was a popular entertainer in the places he had 
been heard — and reports from his first broadcast for us indicate he 
went over big,” Baldanzi said. 


claiming, “We want pensions, not 
Weckler’s love letters.” 

(Weckler is Herman L. Weckler, 
Chrysler Corp. Vice President and 
General Manager.) 

In addition to employes of 14 
Detroit plants, Chrysler workers 
were out at Atlanta, Ga.; New- 
ark, Del.; Kansas City, Kan.; 
Evansville, Kokomo and New 
Castle, Ind.; Helena, Ark.; Marys- 
ville, Mich., and two plants at 
San Leandro, Calif. 

Shipbuilding 
Aid Is Urged 

A MERIC AN shipbuilding and 
ship repair facilities today 
are declining at a rate which, 
within five years, will make them 
incapable of meeting an interna- 
tional emergency comparable to 
World War II without five to 
seven years of rebuilding and 
manpower training, President 
Truman was advised last week 
by Pres. John Green of CIO 
Shipbuilding Workers. 

“The shipbuilding industry in 
this country today does not have 
one half the skilled mechanics 
necessary to train other shipbuild- 
ing mechanics if an emergency 
should arise,” Green said. 

“Shipbuilding and ship repair, 
in private yards, faces a virtual 
black-out. . . . Permitting the in- 
dustry to die in this manner is 
deliberately killing the skills and 
equipment necessary to this na- 
tion for coriipetitive, commercial 
shipping and for emergency de- 
fense situations.” 

In view of President Truman's 
' budget recommendations, virtu- 
ally ending shipbuilding and ship 
repair allowances, Green urged 
the President to convene a tri- 
partite maritime conference of 
government, industry and labor 
to study the nation's shipbuilding 
facilities. 


Perlow’s UFW Local 
Votes To Back CIO 


I NTL. Secy.-Treas. Max Per- 
low, who for months has 
been leading the left-wing 
fight against National CIO 
within the United Furniture 
Workers, was set .back on his 
heels last week by his own Lo- 
cal 76-B, in New York. 

More than 3000 merpbers of the 
local, largest in the union, at a 
special meeting heard Perlow 
urge continued defiance of the CIO. 
Then, by a landslide vote, they en- 
thusiastically approved the plea 
of Inti. Pres. Morris Pizer for 
militant support of the National 
CIO. Pizer has been heading the 
fight inside the international to 
keep the UFW within the CIO 
and to adhere to CIO policies. 

Perlow was manager of the lo- 
cal before taking the interna- 
tional post. His efforts to swing 
it behind the Communist faction 
dominating the international were 
so obviously doomed that his fol- 
lowers, sensing defeat, attempted 
to stave off a vote by having dis- 
cussion continued until a meeting 
in March. 

“No filibustering! . . . Vote, 
Vote! . . . Quit the stalling!” and 
similar cries rang through the 
meeting hall. 

A fter killing the motion to 
stall, the members voted 
overwhelmingly to support the 
pro-CIO position taken by Pizer 
and an erhbattled minority of the 
General Executive Board. 

Pizer was frequently interrupt- 
ed by applause as he pleaded the 
cause of the National CIO and 
progressive trade unionism. Man- 
ager Michael DiCicco announced 
that he emphatically disagreed 
with the policies Perlow advo- 
cated, charging that the union’s 
money and energy were being 
wasted because organizers had 
to “chase around the country” 
trying to keep locals within the 
union. 

Earlier Pizer had turned back 
against Perlow charges the latter 
had levelled against him in the 
bitter CIO-Communist fight in 
the union. Perlow had accused the 
international president in a let- 
ter to all locals of attempting to 
instigate one-man rule, attempt- 
ing to disregard Executive 6oard 
decisions, and trying to use union 
finds for his “personal gain.” 

“These accusations are entirely 
unfounded,” declared Pizer. “They 
are motivated by the fact that I 
dare to express a point of view 
that I think is in the best interest 
of our entire membership. 

“I believe that our international 
union should cease attacking Na- 
tional CIO. I believe that we have 
to stay in the CIO. I am against 
any action that will lead to our 
expulsion from the CIO and 
thereby head our union toward 
destruction. 

“Ever since I privately and 
publicly expressed these thoughts, 
I am being subjected to personal 
and malicious attacks by Perlow 
and his cohorts.” 

T he UFW is one of the unions 
directed to appear before a 
National CIO hearing board on 
charges of consistently following 
the CJommunist Party line. 

Pizer answered Perlow’s accusa- 
tions in order. 

“It is Perlow who has always 
attempted, and more so now, to 
become the dictator of our inter- 
national union,” said Pizer in re- 
plying to the “one-man rule” 
charge. 

“He is trying to be the presi- 
dent, secretary-treasurer, organi- 
zation director, editor of the 
Furniture Workers Press, office 

N 


manager, director of the insur- 
ance and comptroller of the mim- 
eograph machine. 

“He has pretty good control 
over the mimeograph machine 
and part of the office, but for- 
tunately, not over the members.” 

S O FAR AS disregarding GEB 
decisions is concerned, Pizer 
said that the board, a majority of 
which is aligned with Perlow, at 
its last meeting referred the ques- 
tion of National CIO policy and 
affiliation to the next UFW con- 
vention. This, he said, opened the 
question for discussion by the 
membership — in the columns of 
the Furniture Workers Press as 
well as at local meetings. 

“On the nod of Perlow,” he con- 
tinued, “the majority of the edi- 
torial board prohibited me from 
printing an article presenting the 
point of view for National CIO 
policy and affiliation. But in the 
December issue they ran a long 
editorial, presenting one side of 
the picture and attacking the CIO. 

“Not only was my article pro- 
hibited, but even my editor’s note 
(disassociating myself from the 
editorial and the slanderous at- 
tacks on the CIO, which appeared 
in the previous issue) was kept 
out. Thereby an attempt was 
made to create the impression in 
the minds of the membership 
that their president and editor 
approved of everything that ap- 
peared.” 

He urged all members to ex- 
press their views, pro and con, 
and promised to do what he could 
to get both points of view printed. 

P ERLOW’S CHARGE that Pizer 
was attempting to use union 
funds for his personal gain was 
based on the president’s effort 
to use the union mailing list to 
acquaint the members with his 
viewpoint. 

“The minute I attempted to 
send out this letter,” said Pizer, 
“Perlow created a scene in the 
office, shouting that HE was the 
custodian of the mimeograph ma- 
chine and all supplies. Through 
his ties with the office workers 
union (UPOWA) he impressed 
the office staff that they must 
take orders from HIM and not 
the president.” 

Perlow, he said, denied him ac- 
cess to the mailing list. Through 
CIO counsel he is taking this 
matter to the courts. 

“Yes, Perlow is for economy,” 
he continued. “Perlow will save a 
penny if that will muzzle people 
who don’t agree with him, and 
will recklessly spend thousands of 
dollars if that will promote his 
one-sided, personal point of view. 

A UFWA Rank and File Com- 
mittee for CIO was organized at 
a meeting in Chicago early this 
month by delegates claiming to 
represent 70% of the interna- 
tional’s membership. 

House Unit Votes 
Tax Loophole Plug 

The House Ways and Means 
Committee has voted to impose 
$90 million taxes on the nation’s 
life insurance companies for 
1947-48-49, to partially plug a loop- 
hole in existing tax laws. 

This compromise settlement 
amounts to a very small levy, 
since the companies earned 4^ 
billion over the three-year pe- 
riod. Some of the insurance com- 
panies are reported planning a 
court challenge, charging retro- 
active taxation, but most of them 
have agreed to the settlement,; 
probably on ground that if they 
don’t Congress can hit them 
harder from now on. 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 30, 1950 


3 


. . . All Men Are Created Equal, But— 

Men Who Abide by ‘Master Race’ Theory Seek To Prevent Enactment of Laws To Provide Equai Opportunities 


By ALLAN L. SWIM 

O NE HUNDRED and 74 years ago 
a group of men prepared a doc- 
ument — the Declaration of Independ- 
ence — ^which said: 

“We hold these truths to be^ self-evident, 
that all men are created equal . . 

Today men in high places — in Congress 
and out — are doing everything they can to 
make a mockery of that simple statement 
of principle. 

Some 25 years ago a fellow named 
Adolph Hitler began peddling a “master 
race” doctrine which eventually led the 
world into its most devastating war. 

And recently weVe been witnessing an- 
other attempt by men in high places to 
keep the “master race” idea alive in the 
U. S. 

They^re the men who fight the Truman 
civil rights program. 

S O IT WON’T be charged that I'm one 
of those “damnyankees who doesn't 
understand the problems of the South” let 
me point out that I lived for 30 years in 
Arkansas, Tennessee and Georgia. 


1 have been in every Southern state 
many times. I grew up in a segregated 
community. As a reporter I “covered” sev- 
eral lynchings. I know about the poll tax 
from personal experience. 

And I helped bring a measure of eco- 
nomic freedom — through unionism — to hun- 
dreds of Southerners who are treated as 
second-class citizens because they're not 
white. 

My experiences, which have been rather 
varied, long ago convinced me that the 
people of the South generally are far ahead 
of their political leaders in civil rights 
matters. 

It's true that many of them cling to “the 
old Southern traditions”, but doing so fre- 
quently gives them guilty consciences. 

L ET'S NOT WASTE a lot of time arguing 
about whether there ever could be such 
a thing as complete social and economic 
equality. 

Our concern should be with equality ot 
opportunity. It's the thing we should fight 
for. 

Men and women should be permitted to 
climb as high as their ability permits 


them. They shouldn’t be held down merely 
because of their race, color or creed. 

And, above all, no person should be 
denied the right to make a decent living 
merely because he or she belongs to one 
of the minority groups. 

FEPC legislation was designed to pro- 
vide equality of job opportunities. 

Those who fight FEPC seem to operate 
on the theory that you can judge ability 
by the color of the skin. 

T hebe is much more involved in the 
civil rights struggle than the immedi- 
ate domestic welfare of our own people. 

^ The U. S. has assumed a position of 
world leadership in recent years. It's carry- 
ing the ball for democracy all over the 
globe. It's the chief opponent of commu- 
nism. 

Imagine how false our story of democ- 
racy must sound to the colored peoples of 
the Orient who know that Negroes are 
required by law to ride in the back of 
street cars in many of our cities. 

The disfranchisement of Negroes in parts 
of our country simply doesn’t make sense 
to the dark-skinned men and women in 
other countries. 


Imagine our attempting to sell our seg- 
regation practices to the people of China 
and India. 

And imagine the weapons our inequality 
of opportunity provides the peddlers of 
communism. 

I T'S IMPOSSBBUE right now to know 
how much — or how little — Congress will 
do about civil rights legislation at its pres- 
ent session. 

It's certain that the “master race boys” 
— those who deny that all men are created 
equal — will fight with all their strength 
to prevent enactment of the Truman pro- 
gram. 

They can be beaten— if those who pro- 
fess to believe in civil rights will make a 
real fight. Mere lip service won’t get the 
job done. 

It will take hard work and a lot of it. 
It will take pressure from the folks back 
home. It will take courage. 

It’s a job that must be done eventually 
if we're to retain our leadership and our 
national self respect. 

The sooner we do it the better. 


Union Talks Back 


Hillman Grants To Total $42,500 


It’s been the fashion, in post-war years, for industry to 
try to shift the blame for some of its most unsavory practices. 
Unions have been blamed for price increases which labor didn’t 
cause and didn’t want. 

Now the United Steelworkers of America has talked back — 
sharply. 

‘We’re tired of being a whipping boy for this (steel) 
industry,” the union said, “especially when we are charged with 
responsibility for things which we have not done.” 

What the union did was to get a long-needed $100-a-month 
pension and a social insurance plan for its hundreds of thou- 
sands of members. 

What the steel industry did was to jack up prices by more 
than $4 a ton — and to claim, falsely, that the union’s welfare- 
pension program was solely the cause. 

Now the union has demonstrated, with facts and figures, 
that the industry spokesmen are talking through their tall silk 
hats. 

The union showed, for instance, that the steel industry’s 
cost of raw materials is down something like $400 million a 
year: that the pension-welfare plan, whatever it cost, could 
have easily been paid out of super-high profits, without a price 
increase; that the new prices will bring the industry about an 
extra $264 million a year from John Q. Consumer. 

That $264 million is a lot more than the pensions and 
welfare plans will cost the industry. 

There’s food for thought by our Congressmen in those 
figures. 

And they give the lie to those newspaper columnists who 
blame labor for each price increase. The blame clearly lies in 
corporate selfishness. 


T he Sidney Hillman Foun- 
dation has alocated $42,- 
500 for scholarships, grants-in- 
aid, merit awards and other 
prizes for 1950, the trustees 
announced last week. 

The foundation honors the 
memory of the late Sidney Hill- 
man, president of the Amal- 
gamated Clothing Workers, and 
seeks to perpetuate his concep- 
tion of labor - management re- 
lations and his other interests in 
the broad field of social welfare. 

The foundation for the first 
time^set up a series of eight prize 
awards of $500 each, to be given 
annually, in general, periodical 
and labor journalism; radio, and 
television, fiction, drama and mo- 
tion pictures. In the field of gen- 
eral journalism there will be sep- 
arate awards for articles or series 
of articles, and editorials. 

“Submissions in these respective 
fields,” said the foundation an- 
nouncement, “may deal Vv^ith the 
general subject of trade-union de- 
velopment, race relations, and 
world peace, including related 
problems. Especially relevant will 
be those submissions ‘dealing with 
a labor or social theme, honestly 
representing the labor struggle 
or the struggle for human better- 


J ACOB S. POTOFSKY, Hillman’s 
successor as ACW president, 
is also president of the foundation. 
He said that the trustees of the 
fund set aside $1000 for the an- 
nual Hillman Award for Meritor- 
ious Achievement, last year pre- 
sented to Sen. Frank P. Graham 
(D., N.C.), former president of 
the TJniv. of North Carolina. 

The foundation voted $10,000 to 
the Univ. of Chicago social science 
department, covering a two-year 
period, to analyze school and col- 
lege textbooks for the purpose of 
rooting out prejudice and discrim- 
ination. 


Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt has been 
awarded the Irving Geist Founda- 
tion’s first prize for the most 
distinguished contribution to in- 
terfaith and interracial under- 
standing appearing in a New 
York newspaper in 1949. 

The award, which is adminis- 
tered by the Newspaper Guild of 
New York, was based on her col- 
umn, My Day, in the New York 
W or Id-Telegram. 

Second prize of $400 went joint- 
ly to Ted Poston and Oliver Pilat, 
both of the New York Post, for 


Scholarships were awarded as 
follows: Brandeis Univ., Waltham, 
Mass,. $2000; Howard Univ., Wash- 
ington, $2000; New School for So- 
cial Research, New York City, 
^2000; New York State School of 
Industrial Labor Relations, Cor- 
nell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y., $2000; 
Roosevelt College, Chicago, $5000; 
and the Chaim Weizmann Insti- 
tute, Rehovoth, Israel, $5000. 

The Sidney Hillman Tool Fund, 
which assists rehabilitation of 
refugees in Israel and traihs them 
as artisans, received $5000. A simi- 
lar amount was set aside for the 
annual Hillman lecture series. 


outstanding reporting on group 
frictions. The award to Poston 
was based on a series on anti- 
Negro rioting at Groveland, Fla., 
and the framing of three young 
Negroes on rape charges. Pilat 
was honored for a series on the 
background of the Peekskill, N. 
Y., riots of last summer. 

Seymour Marks, of the Long 
Island Press, received third award 
of $100 for a series olv the “Red- 
fern Rookery,” a Negro slum area 
in Rockaway, which assisted in 
getting a new low-cost housing 
project for the area. 


Mrs. FDR Wins Geist Award 


llllllllllllllllltllMIHIIIMIIIIMIIIMMMHilllllMliniHIHIilllltllilllMIIIMlillllllHIlilHIIMIIIHIIMIIIMMIIHMIllMilllllMIN* 



Congress of Industrial Organizations 


Philip Murray, President James B. Carey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vice Presidents: Joseph A. Beirne, L S. Buckmaster, Joseph Curran, 
John Green, Allan S. Haywood, O, A. Knight, Walter P, 
Reuther, Emil Rieve, Frank Rosenblum. 

Allan L Swim, Edit^ and Publicity Director 

Assistant Publicity Director: Henry C. Fleisher 
Assistant Editors: Holiace Ransdell, Fred Ross, Arthur Riordan, (On Leave), 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark, William Weiss, Gervase Ni Love 

Editorial Office, 718 Jackson Place, N. Washington 6, D* C» 

Entered as Second Class Matter, Post Office, Washington, D. CX 
Under the Act of Aug. 24. 1912 and Feb. 28. I92S. 

Vol. XIII January 30, 1950 No. 5 

^ THE CIO NEWS, JANCAB¥ 30, 1960 


ment.’ ” 

s 

Keyserling Urges 
Keeping Prices Down 

Business and industry must ad- 
just prices so the consumer can 
buy their products and a high 
level of employment *can be 
maintained, Leon H. Keyserling, 
acting chairman of the Presi- 
dent’s Council of Economic Ad- 
visers, told the Scrap Iron & 
Steel Institute in Washington 
last week. 

“You can have all the demand 
in the world but if the price is 
not right you won’t have the 
sales,” said Keyserling, reflecting 
a position the CIO took a long 
time ago. 

In order to retain “reasonably” 
full employment, the economist 
said, * the production level five 
years from now must be $50 to 
$60 billions above 1948 and 1949. 
With a constantly expanding pop- 
ulation and labor force, he 
warned, the U. S., by either stand- 
ing still or failing to expand its 
production “actually is going 
backward.” 



'‘Nurse! What do these two want here?’^ 













:.WE..eiO -.NEWS; JANflABfr^O.jl^SO 


Jghts Went 
kt And So 
layor Won 


Our Position Remains Unchanged 


T his iS a story about a mayor 
who “won” re-election to office be- 
cause the lights went out while the 
ballots were being counted. 

His opponents charged the “power fail- 
ure” was a fraud, but he served another 
term, anyhow. 

Then the CIO came to town. 

This resulted in a series of events — in- 
cluding a curious “torchlight” parade — 
which hrought an end to the mayor’s 
^career as head of the city government. 

T he IMAYOR was “a quite disreputable 
old man.’ according to a veteran CIO 
representative who related the story. 

He served many terms before the “more 
respectaole” elements of the town decided 
to put up an opposition candidate. 

This candidate bucked a well-oiled local 
political machine and knew the odds were 
against him, but he agreed to make the 
race. 

The campaign ended, the voters went to 
the polls — and then election officials 
gathered at City Hall to count the ballots. 

As the tally was being made the lights 
"Went out suddenly. After they finally came 
back on, anti-administration watchers 
charged the ballot boxes had been 
switched. 

Despite the protest, the incumbent was 
declared elected. 

S OME MONTHS later CIO organizers 
moved into town and undertook the 
task of signing up several hundred women 
at a garment factory, the town’s only in- 
dustry. 

The mayor worked hand-in-glove with 
the plant owners in an effort to defeat the 
unionization drive. 

“He used every trick in the bag in an 
effort to drive the organizers out of town,” 
said the veteran who related the story. 

“He even encouraged mob attacks, with 
the police standing by and doing nothing 
to prevent violence.” 

And many of the town’s people approved 
of the mayor’s opposition to the union al- 
though they disliked his methods. 

A S THE NEXT city election approached 
a curious situation developed — as a di- 
rect result of the CIO. 

Many of the citizens were anxious to get 
rid of the mayor but didn’t want to give 
support to the GIO. 

Some of them considered that defeat of 
“His Honor” would be construed as in- 
dorsement of the union drive. 

Eventually a second candidate entered 
the race and a heated campaign followed. 

It was one of those political battles 
which stir a small town to its very founda- 
tion. 

Shortly before election day it appeared — 
on the surface at least — that the anti-ad- 
ministration man could win if he got an 
honest ballot count. 

His supporters, including CIO members, 
recalled that the lights had gone out at 
the crucial moment two years earlier. 

T he voters went to the polls, marked 
their ballots and returned to their jobs 
or homes to wonder what the outcome 
would be. 

Shortly before the counting of ballots 
was to start, the husbands of CIO mem- 
bers started a “torchlight” parade through 
town and toward City Hall. 

The “torches” were flashlights, which 
they waved and blinked as they paraded 
along Main Street. 

They marched- into City Hall’, with their 
flashlights very much in eyiderice. 

The crowd ^ cheered .and laughed. The ' 
people -knew /another “power failure”' 
wouldn’t help the mayor. v 

And when the ballots were counted the 
town had a new Chief executive. 


POR THC 


O tiEWS 


HST Ties In Excise Tax Cut With Boosting Revenue 


pRESIDENT TRUMAN asked Congress 
^ Jan. 23 not to cut federal excise taxes 
without at the same time raising ravenue 
by plugging loop-holes and increasing cor- 
porate taxes — but Congress seems cool, to 
any change in the tax laws except cuts.. 

The President warned Congress that he 
would not approve legislation cutting the 
excise taxes unless it made up the revenue 
somewhere else. This plain threat of a 
veto was designed to head-off a move in 
Congress to rush through a bill cutting 
the taxes on a long line of commodities 
from toilet preparations to luggage. 

■■■HE PRESIDENT'S message hit hard at 
■ some of the long existing loop-holes in 
the tax laws which he said “undermine 
public confidence in the tax .system.” He 
aimed first at the depletion allowances for 
oil and mining companies, which for many 
years have permitted these companies to 


Vacation Pay W'on 
For 3600 Members 

Some 3600 members of the Textile 
Workers Union won $265,000 in vacation 
pay in 16 arbitration cases in 1949, a 
recent compilation showed. 

The decisions served to bolster 
TWUA’s contention that vacation pay is 
an earned right, not a management hand- 
out, because in almost every case the 
yorkers involved had been laid off and in 
sipme cases had been employed by firms 
/hp longer in existence at the time of the 
^■bitration hearings. Without the union 
‘ to; take up their claims, the workers would 
\:hajve lost, virtually all the money, and 
without the arbitration clauses in their 
contracts they would have lost at least 
part of it, the TWUA pointed out. 


escape hundreds of millions of dollars in 
taxes. 

' The present laws on taxation of oil 
companies, the President said, “are allow- 
ing individuals to build up vast fortunes 
with little more than token contributions 
to tax revenues.” 

“For example,” he added, “during the 
five years, 1943 to 1947, during which it 
was necessary to collect . income tax from 
people earning less than $20 a week, one 
oil operator was able, because of these 
loopholes, to develop properties yielding 
nearly $5 million in a single year without 
payment of any income tax. 

“In addition to escaping the payment of 
tax on his large income from oil opera- 
tions, he was also able through the use of 
his oil tax exemptions to escape payment 
of tax on most of his income from other 
sources. For the five years, his income 
taxes totalled less than $100,000 although 
his income from non-oil sources alone 
averaged almost $1 million each year. 

“This is a shocking example of how pres- 
ent tax loopholes permit a few to gain 
enormous wealth without paying their fair 
share of taxes.” 

T he PRESIDENT also asked Congress 
to plug loopholes which permit educa- 
tional and charitable organizations to en- 
gage in business and industry without 
paying taxes that such activities would 
pay if privately owned. He also asked for 
taxes on life insurance companies and on 
the income of movie stars now using a 
device to escape much of their taxes. 

Plugging these loopholes, the President 
said, “would be a substantial step toward 
increasing the fairness of our taix system, 
and should add several hundred million 


dollars to its yield — sufficient revenue to 
permit substantial excise tax reduction 
where it is most urgently needed.” 

The only specific figure used by the 
President in outlining the scope of his 
proposals was a request for “one billion 
dollars in additional revenue by revising 
and improving the estate and gift tax and 
the corporation tax laws.” 

Excessive exemptions and unduly low 
rates on estates, the chief executive told 
Congress, are permitting, large fortunes 
to be transmitted from one generation to 
another free of taxes. 

As a means of fostering small business, 
the President asked Congress to confine 
the increase in corporate taxation to those 
companies making more than $50,000 a 
year. This would confine the increase to 
one-tenth of all corporations — but would 
apply to all the big ones. (LPA).*^' 


FTC Looks At Shoes 
As Well As Skates 

Just because the roller skating outfit 
Junior got for Christmas has “Made in 
America’^ stamped on the bottom of the 
skates themselves is no assurance that the 
shoes to which they are attached haven’t 
been “Made in Mexico.” 

So says the Federal Trade Commission 
in a complaint issued against Sport Shoes 
Inc. of Chicago, 111. FTC charges that the 
legend “Made in Mexico” on the sole of 
the shoes was effectiyly covered, up when 
the skates were attached. 

Sport Sho^ Inc. has been given 20 
days to answer the complaint. 



Fair Deal Majorities CAN 
Be Elected To Congress 


By D. ROCKWELL CLARK 

T hirty-six out of the 96 
seats in the U. S. Senate 
become vacant in January, 
1951. 

A switch of three votes in the 
Senate in the first session of 
the 81s\ Congress would have 
passed most of the Fair Deal. 

All 435 seats in the Hause be- 
come vacant in January, too. 

A switch of 20 votes in the 
House in the .first session of the 
81st would have passed most of 
the Fair Deal. 

This is why the 1950 Congres- 
sional elections are important to 
labor. 

At present, the 36 Senate 
seats are held by 23 Democrats 
and 13 Republicans. 

The 435 House seats are held 
by 263 Democrats, 171 Republi- 
cans, and one ALP member. 

The elections this fall may 
change the balance. 

There’ll be a chance to change 
governors in 34 states, and leg- 
islatures in 46 states, too. 

In short, except for the offices 
of President and Vice President 
and a little less than two-thirds 


O’ 


FAC Candidates 
Do Quite Well 

The first 1950 political re- 
turns from the South came in 
on Jan. 24 and showed just 
what a determined fight by 
labor and liberal groups can 
do. 

Mayor Delesseps S. Morrison 
of New Orleans, foe of reac- 
tionary Gqv. Earl Long, was as- 
sured of re-election when he 
won the Democratic nomina- 
tion by a two-to-one majority 
over four opponents. 

In the same race, PAC-sup- 
ported candidates won 24 cut 
of 29 contests for ci|y posi- 
tons, including a majority of 
the city Council, and two more 
were so close as to call for run- 
offs. 

The total votes cast, 185,- 
165, represented nearly 90% 
of registered voters. Of these, 
about 26,000 were Negroes, the 
largest number to go to the 
polls since Reconstruction days. 

All of this bodes ill for re- 
actionary Congressman Edward. 
F. Hebert, since New Orleans 
is in his district. 


"THIS BIRP IS ALWAV5 WOROCP 
ABOUT THINGS — BUT WHEN 
IT^ TIME TO REGISTER AND 
VOTE . HE ALWAYS OETS LOST. 

POMT M A LOST^RICH I 


Cive <1 BUCK to PAC 


of the Senate, almost the whole 
political fabric of the nation 
undergoes the scrutiny of the 
voters this November. 

T hey call it an off-year elec- 
tion. Off-year for whom? 
1946 was an off-year for labor 
unions and liberals all over the 
country. Only 34,410,000 people 
bothered to vote — far less than 
half^he eligibles. The 80th Con- 
gress, elected by those few vot- 
ers, was one that labor and lib- 
erals will long remember — with 
distaste. 

In 1948, 48,883,000 people voted. 
Harry Truman was re-elected, to 
‘^everybody’s” surprise — every- 
body who had enough to eat, a 
decent house to live in, a good 
school fbr his children, and 
enough security on his job, that 
Is. 

The same 48,883,000 people 
who voted in the Presidential 
elections also put into office a 
fairly liberal House and Senate. 
They swept the 80th “Worst” 
Congress out. Yet only 52% of 
the eligibles voted. 

W HAT will happen in 1950, 
the off-year? 

If CIO-PAC has anything to 
do with it, a Fair Deal majority 


of such committees have been 
set up on a city or county basis. 

Because of their state-wide 
field and national importance, 
the Senate races attract the 
most attention, though the out- 
come of all 1950 races is vital. 

The Southern Senate races are 
mentioned in a separate story. 

Elsewhere in the nation, in- 
terest centers primarily on: 

The June 6 Democratic pri- 
maries in California, where Rep. 
Helen Gahagan Douglas will 
seek the Senatorial nomination 
against incumbent Sheridan 
Downey. 

The Illinois situation, where 
Senate Majority Leader Scott 
Lucas will face strong opposi- 
tion from former Rep. Everett 
Dirksen (R). 

Utah, where incumbent Elbert 
Thomas (D), chairman of the 
Senate Labor Committee, will 
run in the Democratic primaries 
against former Governor Maw, 
and the victor will probably face 
Wallace Bennett (R), former 
president of the National Asso- 
ciation of Manufacturers. 

Pennsylvania, where Senate 


sKip-mm 


will be returned to both houses 
of Congress. 

In the House, a minimum of 
157 districts in 37 states will 
need close attention. In about 
half of these districts, there , is 
an opportunity to replace the 
reactionary incumbent: in the 
other half, the PAC-supported 
incumbent must be re-elected. 

In the Northeast and Midwest 
the job is to hold liberal gains. 
Many of these districts have 
long histories of going liberal 
in Presidential years and . reac- 
tionary in off-years. A total of 
107 districts in these regions are 
clawed as marginal, which means 
that a slight shift either way 
from the 1948 record would prob- 
ably change the results. 

In the Western states, labor 
and liberals have^ the greatest 
chance of actually picking up 
new seats in the House. There 
are 22 crucial districts out of 
the 35 in the eight Western 
states; there is an opportunity 
to defeat 15 reactionary Con- 
gressmen and, on the other 
hand, seven liberals face tough 
opposition. 

P OLITICAL yeast is at work 
in the South. In the last 
election, 39 Southern reaction- 
aries were elected without op- 
position. 

But this year labor and liberal 
groups are making strenuous 
efforts to get effective opposi- 
tion for all Southern reaction- 
aries. Registration fi g u r e s , 
though still low in most South- 
ern states because of bad laws, 
are on the upgrade. 

The situation on candidates is 
still fluid, and local PAC’s have 
made very few endorsements as 
yet, but everywhere there is 
activity. 

A SIGNIFICANT development 
is the increasing cooperation 
between CIO and the AFL 
League for Political Education. 
In Connecticut, New York, Ohio, 
and Utah there are excellent, 
functioning United Labor Com- 
mittees working state-wide. 

In other states,^ such as Ore- 
gon, California, Mississippi, Ala- 
bama, Texas, similar groups are 
operating informally. Thousands 




r 


How Many Wil 


Your Senator Up For 
tie-election in 1950 is: 


In The Total 
Vote Was: 


Your Sen. 
Won by: 


Ariz,. Carl Hayden, 
Ark., J. W. Fulbrigh 


Conn., Brien McMahon, D.... 
William Benton, D 


Henry C. Dworshak, R.. 


Iowa, B. Hickenlooper, R 
Kan., Harry M. Darby, R 
Ky., Garrett Withers, D .. 

La., Russell Long, D 

Md., Millard Tydings, D .. 
Mo., Forrest Donnell, R .. 


N. Y., Herbert Lehman, D ...., 

N. C., Clyde R. Hoey, D 

Frank P. Graham, D 

N. D., Milton Young, R 

Ohio, Robert A. Taft, R 


R. L, Edward L. Leahy, D 

S. C., Olin Johnston, D 

S. D., Chan Gurney, R 

Utah, Elbert Thomas, D .... 

Vt., George Aiken, R 

Wash., W. G. Magnuson, D 


. 247,7^9 

160,621 

. 130,226 

50,444 

. m,ui 

150,557 

.3,805,23^ 

151,602 

. 494,888 

63,075 

,. 828,497 

38,968 

* 


,. 470,943 

200,537 

. 272,569 

unopposed 

,. 209,469 

4,723 

.3.913,926 ' 

217,230 

,.1,651,385 

21,723 

..1,021,687 

* 

29,734 

.. 558,430 

131,020 

..1,559,103 

1,988 

.. 52,411 

8,779 

.. 217,057 

<K- 

4,041 

.. 759,850 

307,776 

.. 210,422 

25,572 

..2,983,219 

17,999 

.. 102,391, 

81,629 

.. 443,235 

94,955 

..3,130,211 

23,724 

.. 101,736 

91,322 

.. 227,447 

63,049 

.. 248,280 

49,216 

.. 123,248- 

38,958 

.. 819,819 

87,657 

..1,256,480 

97,369 


• 


This Senator appointed or elected since 1944. 


A SVCIP-MUNR IS A GUY WHO'S 
NEVER THERE WHEN YOU WANT 
HIM TO REGtSTER SO HE CAN 
VOTt. 

VOfi*r BC A SKIP-MUNK I 


Qive a BUCK to PAC 

psff/srsp/ vors/ 


Majority Whip Francis J. Myers 
will have a tough fight against 
strong Republican opposition. 
Gov. Duff (R) and Rep. John C. 
Kunkel have announced they 
will seek the Republican nomi- 
nation against Myers. 

Wisconsin, where there will be 
opposition to Senator Alexander 
Wiley (R). 

Connecticut, where two Dem- 
ocratic senators, Brian McMahon 
and William Benton, both are up 
for re-election and will be stren- 
uously opposed. 

Ohio, where Robert A. Taft 
(R), leader of the Dixiegop coali- 
tion, will face the winner of the 
Democratic primaries on May 2. 

All Senate contests will be 
dramatic as the candidates 
emerge. 


Eighteen States Will Al 


T his year, in critically im- 
portant races, 34 governors 
will be up for election, and all 
or part of 46 state legislatures 
will be changed by the voters. 

The state contests are of more 
than usual importance in 1950, 
because upon tWese legislatures 
and governors will fall the task 
of carving up the states in line 
with the finding of the 1950 cen- 
sus. They may, if they choose, 
set up all new Congressional dis- 
tricts. 

The way it looks now, 18 
states will show enough of a 
population difference to warrant 
re-districting. Depending on 
what the voters do this year, 
this may take the form of an 
honest reapportionment of Con- 
gressional districts or it may 
lead to some of the sorriest ger- 
rymandering ever seen. 

<Funk and WagnalTs Collegiate 
Dictionary: “Gerrymander (N). An 
nnnatural or arbitrary redistrict- 
ing of a state or county.”) 

Eleven of these states will lose 
a total of 14 Congressmen and. 
seven will pick up an equal num- 


ber, according to a survey based 
on the 1948 estimated census 
and compiled by the staff direc- 
tor of the House Post Office and 
Civil Service. Committee. 

The 11 which stand to lose are 
Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Ken- 
tucky, Mississippi, Missouri, New 
York, North Carolina, Okla- 
^homa, Pennsylvania and Tennes- 
see. 

The five southern states and 
Illinois, Missouri and Oklahoma 
each will lose one Congressman 
apiece, it appears. Pennsylvania 
will lose two and New York will 
drop three. 

The population shift which has 
brought this about has been 
westward. California stands to 
gain the amazing total of eight 
new Representatives. Oregon 
and Washington pick up one 
each, as do Florida, Indiana and 
Michigan. 

T he only two states not 
electing a portion of their 
legislatures this year are New 
Jersey and Virginia, which, ac- 


cording to thi 
tain the sam 
gressmen. 

The gov^ 
be hard-foug 
with 18 Deit4 
publicans i^v 
Gov. Thonic 
of New York',' 
tial candidate 
is running ag' 
cratic candf 
may be Rep^ 
velt Jr. 

And Gov. 
ning mate," 
(R.) of Cal 
ably will seek 
the Democint 
Roosevelt, 
PAC-indors< 
(D.), formel? 
be opposed hi 
non (R.) in 
Gov. “ifui 
(D), son of^ 
may tangle 
Ellis Arnall X 
since the st 


Here Is The CIO- 


CIO-PAC EXECiUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS (1. to r.): Frank Rosenblum, ACW Murray, CIO President, Steelworker 

Secretary-Treasurer; Jacob Potofsky, ACW President; Emil Mazey, UAW Jack Kroll, PAC director; David f. 

Secretary-Treasurer; Walter Reuther, UAW Resident; James B. Carey, CIO urer and also Secretary-Treasurer 

Secretary-Treasurer, and administative committee chairman, lUE; Philip C. W. Werkau, CWA Secretary-Treas 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 30, 1950 


N 





Vote This Year? 


Or a 

margin of: 


But only this many 
eligibles voted: 


In 1950 this many 
can vote: 


How many 
will vote? 


64.8% 

15% 

1,564,000 

38.7% 

82% 

404,000 

70.2% 

20% 

1 , 100,000 

4.6% 

50% 

7,385,000 

12.7% 

68% 

721,000 

4.7% 

65% 

1 , 445,000 

42.6% 

28% 

1,538,000 

— 

13% 

1,917,000 

2.3% 

67% 

318,000 

5.6% 

76% 

6 , 014,000 

1.3% 

70% . 

2,659,000 

2.9% 

66% 

1.735.000 

1.333.000 

1.618.000 
1,525,000 

23.5% 

87% 

1,418,000 

.1% 

. 62% 

2 , 649,000 

16.8% 

44% 

95,000 

1.9% 

68% 

376,000 

10,236,000 

40.5% 

14% 

2,090,000 

12.2% 

68% 

332,000 

.6% 

63% 

5 , 345,000 

11.6% 

53% 

1,452,000 

21.4% 

50% 

1 , 242,000 

.6% 

60% 

7 , 324,000 

513,000 

89.8% 

20% 

1,039,000 

27.7% 

62% 

387,000 

19.8% 

61% 

386,000 

31.6% 

61% 

240,000 

10.7%, 

54% 

l,814fi00 

7.7% 

62% 

2,190,000 


Congressional Districts 


Istimatei will re- 
lumber of Con- 

plyp races will 
aAd colorful, 
la^s and 16 Re- 

lE. Dewey (R.) 
If^ated Presiden- 
1944 and 1948, 
and, the Demo- 
against him 
InJ'lin D. Roose- 

pVsf former run- 
Earl Warren 
i^a, very prob- 
eloction against 
laKdidate, James 
h FDR. 

■Chester Bowles 
Ia" director, will 
l^uer Gov Shan- 
pa«ticut. 

Talmadge 
Ifi-Gallus Gene,” 
|,h former Gov. 
> D.) in Georgia, 
Ltorney general 


has declared them both eligible 
to run. 

Gov. William S. Beardsley (R.) 
of Iowa, who was elected with 
PAG support, is running again; 
his opposition is not settled. 

Gov. Paul A. Dever (D.) of 
Massachusetts, also elected with 
PAG support, will face tough 
Republican opposition, as yet un- 
named. 

PAG-indorsed G. Mennen Wil- 
liams (D.) of Michigan also 
faces a fight; his opposition is 
still smarting from his “sur- 
prise” election. 

The Ohio voters, who will de- 
cide whether to retire Sen. Rob- 
ert A. Taft (R.); will also decide 
whether to keep Gov. Frank 
Lausche (D.). 

In Oregon, State Senator Rich- 
ard Neuberger (D.), well-known 
liberal author, may run against 
Gov. Douglas McKay (R.). 

The Pennsylvania situation is 
wide open. At least a half-dozen 
candidates have announced they 
will be in the Republican race 


for governor. On the Democratic 
slate two have announced. Gov. 
James H. Duff and Rep. John G. 
Kunkel are seeking the Re- 
publican nomination for Senate. 
Senate Majority Whip Francis 
J. Myers has announced his can- 
didacy for re-election. 

Gov. John O. Pastore of Rhode 
Island, the first state governor 
publicly to go on record against 
the Taft-Hartley law, is up for 
re-election. 

Gov. J. Strom Thurmond of 
South Carolina, Dixiecrat candi- 
date for President in 1948, will 
run against Sen. Olin Johnston 
(D.); former Secretary of State 
James F. Byrnes has announced 
his candidacy for the governor- 
ship on an anti-Fair Deal plat- 
form. 

PAG-indorsed Gordon Brown- 
ing (D.) of Tennessee faces a 
fight from the remains of the 
Grump machine. 

These are only a few of the 
governorship contests of impor- 
tance. 


iC Executive Board 


Liberals Face Dixiecrats 
In Early South Fights 


T he first decisions in 
1950’s Congressional and 
state elections will be made 
in the Southern states, since 
the South has early primar- 
ies, as a rule, and the primar- 
ies, for all practical purposes, 
determine the outcome of the 
elections. 

The primary fights this year 
will be intense, because the 
South’s traditional “one-party” 
political operation is charging, 
through the activity of liberal 
groups, into a “two-party” pri- 
mary race in state after state. 

It all takes place on the 
“Democratic” ticket, but the 
shadings of Southern “Demo- 
cratic” opinion go all the way 
from J. Strom Thurmond, gov- 
ernor of South Garolina, who 
ran for President on the States’ 
Rights (Dixiecrat) • ticket, to 
Frank Graham, newly appointed 
Senator from North Garolina, a 
staunch Fair Dealer and a for- 
mer public member of the War 
Labor Board. 

T he PARADE starts off May 
2, when Alabama and Flo- 
rida have their primaries. 

In Alabama, there are nine 
Gongressional districts, of which 
five currently are held by 
active members of the Dixie- 
gop coalition. Sen. Lister Hill, 
who was supported by labor in 
1944, faces a tough •fight. PAG- 
indorsed Gov. James E. Folsom 
cannot, by state law, succeed 
himself, which leaves the field 
wide open. 

Liberal groups working to 
^find and elect candidates in 
Alabama are up against a poll 
tax which not only requires 
payment of $1.50 a year but says 
that any and all delinquent poll 
taxes, up to a total of $36.00, 
must be paid. 

All poll taxes are due a full 
three months before the pri- 
mary. Would-be voters also 
must register, and to register 
they must be accompanied by 
two qualified voters. Under 
this system, only 14% of Ala- 
bama’s potential 1,564,000 vot- 
ers cast their ballots in 1948, a 
Presidential year. 

In Florida, PAG-supported 
Sen. Glaude Pepper faces heavy 
opposition from conservative 
Rep. George Smathers. The six- 
man Florida delegation to the 
House probably will be in- 
creased to seven by the 1950 
census. Florida has no poll tax; 
registration for the primary 
runs to April 1. There is no 
gubernatorial election this year. 
In 1948, 39% of eligibles voted. 

North Carolina's primaries 
come on May 27. 

The two North Garo-lina Sena- 
tors, of opposite opinions on 


Usident and chairman of PAG Board; 
|cl5onald. Steelworkers Secretary-Treas- 
^^0; Joseph Beirne, GWA President; 
I; l^mil Rieve, TWUA Resident; William 


S. Pollock, TWUA Secretary-Treasurer; and L. S. Buckmaster, Rubber Workers 
-President. Not shown: Desmond Walker, Rubber Workers Secretary-Treasurer. 
(No picture available.) The PAG Board will have a dinner meeting on Feb. 14, 
same day as the CIO Executive Board convenes. 


almost every issue, are both up 
for re-election this year. One 
is Frank Graham, mentioned 
above; the other, reactionary 
Clyde R. Hoey. Graham was 
appointed to fill an unexpired 
term. Hoey was elected in 
1944 by a wide margin, but with 
only 14% of eligibles voting. 

All 12 North Carolina repre- 
sentatives are seeking re-elec 
tion. 

There is no poll tax in North 
Carolina, but the state’s regis- 
tration laws are tough. The 
law permits counties to call for 
new registration at intervals, 
and this year approximately 
three out of every four counties 
have done so. North Carolina 
citizens may register only on 
three days of , the year — the 
three Saturdays^ within the two- 
week period April 29-May 13. 

A rkansas’ primaries are on 
July 25, but in order to 
vote on that day, the registrant 
must have paid his poll tax by 
Oct. 1, 1949, nearly a year earli- 
er. Sen. J. W. Fulbright is up 
for re-election. He has a fair- 
ly spotty record. All seven Ar- 
kansas Representatives are can- 
didates for re-election. Only 
'22% of the state’s potential 
1,100,000 voters cast a ballot in 
1948; only 20% in 1944. 

On July 11 come the South 
Carolina primaries. 

Sen. Olin Johnston, of South 
Carolina, who was supported by 
labor in 1944, will be opposed 
by Dixiecrat Gov. Thurmond, 
while former Secy, of State 
James F. Byrnes tries to replace 
Thurmond as governor. Of the 
six-man South Carolina House 
delegation, only one has a lib- 
eral record. 

In South Carolina, the only 
primary registration is “enroll- 
ment on the party books,” and 
the poll tax of $1 is payable only 
for voting in the general elec- 
tion, but whatever the apparent 
ease of becoming a voter, only 
about one in every three eligi- 
bles was “enrolled” in 1948. 

Th wide-open Texas primaries 
are on July 22. . 

Gov. Allan Shivers and the 21- 
man Texas House delegation are 
up, including House Speaker 
Sam Rayburn. 

Texas has no registration at 
all. The poll tax must be paid 
by Jan. 31, or six months before 
the primaries, however. In 1948, 
nearly 40% of Texas’ millions 
paid their poll taxes. A refer- 
endum to repeal the tax was 
defeated last fall, by a narrow 
margin, in a light vote. 

T ENNESSEE’S primaries are 
Aug. 3. 

Gov. Gordon Browning, anti- 
Crump and PAG-supported, will 
face opposition. Tennessee’s 
10-man House delegation will be 
in a free-for-all. Three of the 
Representatives have consist- 
ently bad labor records, but the 
caliber of the delegation has 
improved measurably. For in- 
stance, Tennessee was the only 
Southern state where a major- 
ity of the Congressmen voted 
against the proposed power 
grab by the Dixiegop Rules 
Committee. 

There is a poll tax of $1 to $2 
in Tennessee, for the general 
election only; women and veter- 
ans were exempted under a law 
passed by the last (anti-Crump) 
session of the legislature. The 
state elections are particularly 


important this year. The new 
legislature will redistrict, since 
Tennessee stands to lose one 
Congressman after the 1950 
census; it will also be called on 
to approve the first revisions to 
the outmoded State constitu- 
tion since it was written in the 
1870’s. 

On Aug. 8 come the primaries 
in Mississippi and Virginia. Five 
of Mississippi’s six Congressmen 
are up for re-election. Included 
is the infamous John F. Rankin, 

A poll tax of $2 must be 
paid in Mississippi for two con- 
secutive years before the would- 
be voter may cast his ballot, 
and these payments must be 
made on the due date each year 
and cannot be combined. The 
due date t^his year is Feb. 1. 
Under this set-up, Rankin was 
elected by 16,800 votes, with no 
opposition, in 1948, although 
there were 2,183,796 people in 
the state in 1940 and nearly 
312,000 in Rankin’s district. 

Virginia’s nine-man House 
delegation, including only one 
liberal, is up for re-election. 

A VIRGINIA voter has to pay 
a poll tax of $1.50 a year, 
before May 1, and delinquent 
taxes up to $4.99 also must be 
paid. In addition, the would-be 
voter must go before the regis- 
trar and write correctly the 
answers to a list of questions 
set forth in the state constitu- 
tion. Until two years ago the 
voter could ^ at least take the 
list of questions with him; now, 
the Attorney General has ruled 
that the voter must remember 
the questions as well as the an- 
swers. 

In 1949, only 35.3% of poten- 
tial Virginia voters were able 
to register. 

Louisiana’s primaries are 
Aug. 29. 

Sen. Russell Long and the 
eight Louisiana Representatives 
will provide a political slug-fest 
unmatched in recent years. 
(See story elsewhere on this 
page.) 

Louisiana has no poll tax, but 
registration must be renewed 
every eight years, and this is the 
year. Hours of registration, ex- 
cept in the 30 days prior to July 
30, the final date, are from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m., and there is no 
provisions for mobile registrars. 
In 1948, only 35.3% of the 
state’s potential voters regis- 
tered and only 28% voted. 

(As a result of the Intensive ef- 
forts being put on by labor-liberal 
groups, however, ^ registration im 
New Orleans Parish in less thaa 
one year has come within 2000 of 
the 209,000 registered in the entire 
eight years previous.) 

Finally, Georgia’s primary is 
Sept. 13, although registration 
in Fulton Co. (Atlanta) must be 
completed by May 6. 

Sen. Walter F. George, anti- 
Fair Deal chairman of the Sen- 
ate Finance Committee, is up 
for re-election, as are nine out 
of the 10 Representatives, most 
of whom are reactionary. Gov. 
“Hummon” Talmadge’s term 
also expires this year. 

Georgia has no poll tax, and 
the effective date of its stran- 
gling new registration law has 
been postponed for two years, 
so the outlook for voter regis- 
tration is good. In 1948, 67% of 
the potential voters were regis- 
tered, though only 22% voted. 


N 


THE GIO NEWS, JANUARY 30, 1950 


7 










‘Chamber Of Horrors’ Warns Of Miracle Cures 


By WILLIAM WEISS 

A NUMBER of unethical 
businessmen and self- 
styled inventors have operated 
successfully for years on 
Barnum’s theory that “there’s 
a sucker born every minute.” 

They have offered — and sold — 
“miracle” cures for rheumatism, 
cancer, arthritis and fallen 
arches. 

They have marketed fantastic 
mechanical contrivances “guar- 
anteed” to eliminate nearly every 
human ailment. 

They not only have cheated the., 
public out of money but have 
also impaired the health and even 
caused the death of gullible cus- 
tomers. 

High on their “sucker list” are 
the working men and women of 
the nation. Persons with annual 
incomes of $3000 and less are re- 
garded by many of the gyps as 
the best prospects for many of 
their worthless gadgets. 

Nobody knows just how much 
Americans spend annually on 
phony “health improving” me- 
chanical and electrical contrap- 
tions but the figure must run 
into the millions of dollars. 

Some of the gadgets are simple 
and inexpensive. Others resem- 
ble -Rube Goldberg creations and 
are costly. 

T HERE’S A governmental 
agency which cracks down 
whenever possible on the han- 
dlers of the “cure-alls.” It’s the 
Food and Drug Administration, 
which maintains a fantastic 
“Chamber of Horrors” in Wash- 
ington. 

I went over to the “Chamber” 
recently to find out what the 
“sucker list boys” try to palm 
off on the public. 

One of the most amazing fakes 
shown me was the “spectro- 
chrome,” a worthless machine 
which enjoyed wide popularity 
until FDA inspectors caught up 
with the “inventor,” “Doctor” 
Dinshah Ghadiali of Bombay, 
India. 

His mysterious outfit consisted 
of a metal box mounted on an 
adjustable stand. Inside the box 
were a 1000-watt lamp and a fan 
to keep it cool. Light from the 
lamp shows through an aperture 
into which various coloreid panes 
of glass are inserted. 


Poor Ad! 

When the “inventor” of a 
“high frequency” machine to 
cure arthritis was summoned to 
court to answer FDA charges of 
fraud, he himself was so crip- 
pled with arthritis that he had 
to testify from a wheel chair. He 
was unable even to raise his 
arm to take the oath! 


Suppose a prospective “patient” 
had diabetes. The “Doctor” would 
instruct him to expose his body 
to alternate yellow and magenta 
rays at certain specific times of 
day or night. An elaborate chart 
furnished with each machine 
points out the time at which the 
rays are “most effective.” For 
example, if the time table called 
for a yellow ray at 4 p.m. and 
the user jumped the gun and 
used it at 3 p.m. he could expect 
little or no benefit, the chart said. 

In addition the diabetic was ad- 
vised by “Dr.” Ghadiali 'to give 
up insulin if it -had been pre- 
scribed by an authentic physician 
and to eat foods with a heavy 
starch content. 

Purple light was supposed 
to decrease sexual activity, 

Sy 


THE “SPECTRO-CHROME” (above) is on exhibit at the Food 
and Drug Administration’s “Chamber of Horrors” in Wash- 
ington, D. C. The maker claimed it cured any disease by shining 
colored lights on the patient. Over 9000 of these worthless 
machines were leased to ailing individuals for $90 a year before 
the “inventor” was finally convicted, fined $20,000 and sentenced 
to three years in jail. 


white light to increase it. Ve- 
nereal diseases could be cured in 
early stages by green light but 
advanced cases required a series 
of. yellow light flashes, the “Doc- 
tor” claimed. 

■I^R.” Ghadiali, possessor of self- 

' ^ bestowed M.E., D. C., and ph. 
D. degrees in addition to his 
M.D., claimed his machine would 
cure any human ailment, includ- 
ing cancer and tuberculosis. “You 
don’t need a diagnosis,” he told 
his victims, “just tell me where 
you hurt. The machine will do 
the rest.” 

As fantastic as it may seem, 
more than 9000 of these contrap- 
tions were leased to individuals 
at $90 a year before FDA secured 
a conviction. The “doctor” was 
fined $20,000 and sentenced to 
three years in jail. 

According to FDA “Chamber of 
Horror” attendants, an incident 
occurred during the spectro^ 
chrome trial which indicates how 
honest but gullible persons are 
sometimes willing to testify how 
they have been benefitted by use 
of such phony gadgets. 

A former “patient” took the 
stand and solemnly stated, “I 
had fits all my life until Dr. 
Ghadiali cured me. His spectro- 
chrome stopped my fits. I feel 
fine.” 

Whereupon the witness stiff- 
ened, collapsed on the floor and 
began frothing at the mouth! 

■■^HAMBEB” attendants 
pointed out another “mirac- 
ulous” gadget which, according to 
the attached label, “would abso- 
lutely cure bronchial troubles, 
sinus conditions, burns, injuries 
and illnesses in general.” 

It, was a small glass tube com . 
taining barium chloride in a 
metal container about the size 
of a. 5 cent lead pencil. While 
an ordinary pencil would have 
just as much curative powers, this 
little item was more expensive. 

It cost $300! 


THE “MECHANICAL HEARX” for which this FDA employe 
is an attractive backdrop was supposed to cure toothache, 
nervousness, burns, fallen arches, broken noses, but it did none 
of these things. It consisted of a dry cell battery, a small buzzer 
coil and attachments to apply electrical currents to various 
parts of the body. Hundreds of these gadgets were sQld at 
about $300 each. 


No need even to point this de- 
vice at any part of the anatomy 
to benefit from its claimed heal- 
ing powers. It was designed to 
be hung around the neck and, 
in some cases, likely remained 
there until the patient was dead! 

Over in one corner of the 
“Chamber” ^was what appeared 
at first glance to be a poor man’s 
Turkish bath. This, I was told, 
came complete with plumbing 
connections, a portable generator 
and cabinet in which the person 
seeking to be cured of arthritis, 
diabetes, lung abscess or jaw 
decay, seated himself. 

Fumes from drugs heated on 
the generator circulated through 
the cabinet and were positively 
guaranteed “to cure all or any 
of the above ailments.” 

It was designed, the accom- 
panying booklet stated, “espe- 
cially for hopeless cases” or for 
“whatever is wrong.” The in- 
ventor said it was worth much 
more tlfhn the “modest price,” 
$ 2200 . 

^^ICTIMS OF colds, bronchitis, 
* asthma, neuritis and kidney 
disorders who preferred to be 
shaken and jolted back to health 
had their choice of various elabo- 
rate “chamber” exhibits. 

One of these, a large box-like 
affair costing $6500 featured a 
mattress with concealed heavy 
springs. When the springs re- 
leased the occupant would be 
tossed up toward the roof of the 
box. Corrugated vibrating rub- 
ber side pads massaged him on ' 
the way down. 

Another exerciser “guaranteed” 
success and cure by the use of 
“dancing atoms.” A third, a com- 
bination oscillator and roller, sold 
for $1840. 

In the event a “quick cure” ap- 
plicant showed a preference for 
electrical devices, he had a choice 
of several contraptions, aU 
equally worthless. One of these, 
which cost $1500*, consisted of an 
inverted induction coil installed 


in a second-hand cabinet./ The 
coil produced an electric shock 
to the patient by means of 
terminal pads and was particu- 
larly effective, according to the 
circular, in treatment of cancer. 

^JNE OF THE most primitive 
of the exhibits is a round 
“patty-cake” like ordinary con- 
crete disk, termed by its modest 
inventor, “Farmer Brown’s Mas- 
ter Cell.” 

Immersed in drinking water for 
72 hours, it was supposed to im- 
part the secret of life. Cows 
which drank this water would 
become calves on the spot, and 
old chickens, after two or three 
gargles, became pullets again, the 
inventor said. 


Taith!' 


FDA enforcement agents fre- 
quently come in contact with 
pathetic cases when they at- 
tempt to seize fraudulent devices 
from people who believe they 
have benefited from their use. 
One woman, protesting a seizure 
said, “You must not take it 
away. It helped me. It helped 
my husband. It helped my 
mother. She just died last week.” 


Crops such as corn, sprinkled . 
with the water would have a 
phenomenal yield, “Farmer 
Brown” claimied. It was leased, 
not sold, for- $10 a year. 

Although even the most gullible 
individual might have been ex- 
pected to gag on this one, 
strangely enough interstate dis- 
tribution soon followed news- 
paper publicity concerning . the 
“cell” and the elixir of youth . it 
was claimed to produce. 

A Federal Court Judge was um 
convinced however, and issued an 
injunction forbidding Brown to 
ship the “cell” in interstate com- 
merce. ^ - - r. , 


I^ANY OTHER exhibits of fake 
devices are on display at 
Food and Drug Administration 
headquarters, most of them de- 
signed to victimize innocent peo- 
ple searching frantically for a 
“short cut” cure for bodily ills. 

The number and scope of the 
unscrupulous men who prey on 
the gullibility of these unfortu- 
nates would be greatly increased 
were it not for the constant vigil- 
ance of the Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration, which is part of the 
Federal Security Agency, 

Almost 43 years ago, the first, 
comprehensive national food arid 
drug law was enacted by Con- 
gress. The law, and its succes- 
sor, the Federal Food, Drug and 
Cosmetic Act of 1938 have been 
of inestimable value in protect- 
ing American consumers and con- 
scientious manufacturers. In addi- 
tion, the laws have contributed 
immeasurably to the improvement 
oi the quality and honest labeling 
of the nation’s food, drug and 
cosmetics. 

Americans owe a debt of grati- 
tude to FDA law enforcement 
officers. These men are highly 
tfained specialists, experts in de- 
tecting cases of attempted fraud — 
whether it be in the misbranding 
of a product, the tracing of a 
disguised shipment of contami- 
nated food or the investigation 
of a suspicious appearing mechan- 
ical “cure all” contraption. 

Vets Warned Of Gyps 

As the first of the $2800 million' 
insurance dividend money goes 
out to 16 million World War vet- 
erans, they have been warned by 
the Better Business Bureaus of 
all major cities to look out for 
gyps. The warning is designed, 
to protect the veterans from buy- 
ing^ particularly, dubious oil and 
mining, stocks, unseen real estate, 
partnerships in nebulous : busi-: . 
nesses, agencies for merchandise: . 
that won't sell, wildcat insurance, • 
and qours'es) in “gypf'; schools. 




FEPC Foes In House Act 
Like Reds In Unions 


By GERVASE N. LOVE 

C ONGRESSIONAL backing 
and filing over the Fair- 
Employment Practices Com- 
mission bill last week was for 
all the world like a union 
meeting or convention with the 
Communists on the losing side. 

With the Dixiegops replacing 
the lefties, foes of FEPC forced 
a broad battle of technicalities 
that set House parliamentarians 
to working overtime, in quest of 
tactics to keep alive a viciouft 
circle. The foes wanted to stall 
and the friends wanted action, 
and the parliamentarians, being 
impartial, served both sides to 
the point of desperation. 

The only accomplishments dur- 
ing the week— and they were both 
minor and clouded — were the ap- 
pearance of discharge petitions 
and a tentatively scheduled show- 
down vote in the House Rules 
Committee for Jan. 31. 

The Rules Committee provided 
a major share of the frustration 
during the week. On Tuesday it 
refused by a five to five tie vote 
to bring up the FEPC legislation 
for House action, the Dixiegop 
majority scoring a victory. Then 
Rep. Clarence J. Brown (R., O.) 
moved for reconsideration on Jan. 
26 because two GOP committee 
members, Rep. , James W. Wads- 
worth (N. Y.) and Rep. Leo E. 
Allen (111.), were not present. 

Came Jan. 26 and Wadsworth 
was still out sick. But he hoped 
to be back by Jan. 31, so the 
committee delayed final action 
and tentatively set a vote for that 
date. Neither Wadsworth nor 
Allen has said how he will vote 
on FEPC, but polls have listed 
them in opposition to the bill. 
Many observers believe that 
when the vote is finally taken, 
it may end in another tie, this 
time six to six instead of five to 
five. 

T he appearance of the pe- 
titions, under which the Ru^^es 
Committee may be forced to dis- 
charge a pending bill for House 
action if 218 signatures are ob- 
tained, touched off a tussle be- 
tween Rep. Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
Jr. (D.-L., N. Y.) and Rep. Adam 
Clayton Powell, Jr. (D., N. Y.). 

Roosevelt filed his discharge pe- 
tition Jan. 23. Two days later 
Powell, author of the bill, filed a 
second petition, a rarety in House 
history. 

The same day Powell took the 
floor and in effect accused Roose- 
velt of filing his petition to fur- 
ther his chances of becoming 
Governor of New York. Repub- 


C IO SECY.-TREAS. James, B. 

Carey, in a statement read to 
the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee, urged American rati- 
fication of the United Nations 
Genocide Convention, which would 
outlaw the systematic elimination 
of races and peoples by ruthless 
governments. 

Carey charged that more than 
11 million prisoners are contained 
in Soviet Russia slave labor 
camps at the present time. 

‘‘Both Hitler and Stalin organ- 
ized the greatest machinery for 
literally squeezing the blood out 
of human beings^^for two pur- 
poses,” Carey said. “First, to get 
human energy without pay, and 
secondly to kill, through over- 


licans favoring FEPC were refus- 
ing to sign the Roosevelt petition, 
he asserted. Roosevelt’s action, 
he said, was ‘ill-timed.” 

The late President’s son vigor- 
ously denied that either personal 
or political motives prompted him 
to file the petition. He offered 
to withdraw it if Powell would 
give him a list of Republicans 
who would not sign the Roosevelt 
petition, but would sign the 
Powell petition in sufficient num- 
bers to make it operative. Pow- 
ell, he observed, seemed “to have 
a closer connection with the 
American Labor Party and the 
Republican Party than I.” 

“If that does not prove to you, 
Mr. Powell,” he said, “that I have 
no personal motives in this but to 
bring FEPC to the floor, then I 
do not kr^ow whatever will prove 
it to you. Now let’s see who 
really wants FEPC.” 

Powell said that 64 Republicans 
joined with Democrats the pre- 
vious week to block a change in 
House rules under which the 
Rules Committee could bottle up 
legislation at will. Only two of 
them, he explained, had signed 
the Roosevelt petition. 

W HEN THE rules change was 
blocked, one of the pre- 
liminary parliamentary moves 
was a motion by Minority Leader 
Joseph Martin (Mass.) to adjourn. 
Powell was one of four non- 
Republicans who voted for the 
motion, which was defeated. Had 
it passed, a showdown on the 
change would have been delayed, 
and as a result action of FEPC 
would have been delayed and pos- 
sibly stalled off until Congress 
adjourns. 

Last Wednesday was “Calendar 
Wednesday” in the House for the 
first time in five months. On 
“Calendar Wednesday” the chair- 
man of any committee can bring 
to the floor a bill which his group 
has approved, regardless of its 
status in the Rules Committee, if 
it’s on the calendar. FEPC ad- 
herents forced its revival in their 
quest for a showdown vote. 

So what happened? The com- 
mittees are called alphabetically. 
First up was the Armed Services 
Committee, of which Rep. Carl 
Vinson (D., Ga.) is chairman. He 
brought out a bill giving World 
War II veterans another chance 
to apply for terminal leave pay, 
and pushed it through after ap- 
propriate debate. Chairman John 
Lesinski (D., Mich.) of the Labor 
Committee, was all set, but was 
still waiting at adjournment. As 
things stand now he’ll probably 
wait until the middle of March, 
if not later, before the alphabet 
gets down to the letter “L.” 


work, the undesirable people.” 

“The population -of slave labor 
camps in Germany reached almost 
11 million,” he continued. “The 
number of inmates, including 
those from the Baltic nations in 
the Siberian slave labor camps, 
including the salt mines, is cer- 
tainly higher,” he stated. 

The Senate Committee is hold- 
ing hearings on the UN proposal 
to outlaw genocide, which UN has 
defined as “a denial of the right 
of existence to entire human 
groups and which is the same as 
the denial of the right to live of 
individual human beings.” 

The Carey statement was read 
by Stanley Ruttenberg, CIO Edu- 
cation and Research Director, 


T he second and fourth Mon- 
days of each month are “dis- 
charge days,” on which the chair* 
man of a committee can call for 
House action on a bill his com- 
mittee has approved, after the 
Rules Committee has hung on to 
it for 21 days> Monday of last 
week was the fourth Monday of 
January, and FEPC forces were 
hopeful. 

But Speaker Sam Rayburn, a 
Texan, had nine such bills up. 
So he ruled in favor of measures 
giving statehood to Alaska and 
Hawaii. They held the floor while 
quorums were called for five 
times. On each occasion half an 
hour was devoted to hunting up 
all the Representatives in the 
Capitol and getting them on deck. 
Another half-hour was devoted to 
a formal roll call. On top of that 
there was a teller vote, in which 
members are tallied as they pass 
between counters. More than 
three of the five hours the House 
was in session was spent on the 
roll calls. Nobody did much talk- 
ing about Alaska or Hawaii and 
they’ll be taken up again in the 
future. Seven hours of “discharge 
day” remained when adjournment 
was forced over objections of the 
FEPC forces. 

On Jan. 26 another delay was 
created when the House voted 
unanimously to bypass the next 
discharge day, Feb. 13. The Re- 
publicans asked for it because so 
many of them will be out of town 
in connection with Lincoln’s 
birthday. 

GMj W^Jiouse 
First Rounds 
To WE CIO 

T he CIO International Union 
of Electrical Workers 
scored smashing victories in its 
first election fights with the 
Communist - dominated United 
Electrical, Radio and Machine 
Workers in plants of the in- 
dustry's largest manufactur- 
ers. 

In the Newark, O., plant of the 
Westinghoiise Corp., which be- 
gan operations only recently, the 
lUE-CIO won collective bargain- 
ing rights by a 10 to 1 margin in 
balloting conducted by the Na- 
tional Labor Relations Board. The 
UE was unable to drum up 
enough signed membership cards 
to demonstrate an “interest” and 
couldn’t even get on the ballot. 
The votes not captured by the 
lUE-CIO all went for no union. 

lUE-ClO then drew first blood 
in General Electric Co. contests 
with UE by notching an impres- 
sive 3 to 1 victory at the com- 
pany’s Cobourg, Ont., Canada, 
plant. The election was conducted 
under Canadian government aus- 
pices and represented a clear-cut 
victory for the CIO alfiliate. 

“This just shows,” said James 
B. Carey, CIO secretary-treasurer 
and chairman of the lUE-CIO Ad- 
ministrative Committee, “that the 
workers in General Electric and 
Westinghouse are sick and dis- 
gusted with the UE and are flock- 
ing to the lUE-CIO in increas- 
ingly large numbers.” 

In another Canadian election, 
also conducted by the govern- 
ment, the lUE-CIO won bargain- 
ing rights from the UE at the Le- 
land Electric Co., Guelph, Ont., by 
a substantial 4 to 1 margin. 


Carey Asks U. S. Approval 
Of Genocide Convention 


Senate Alters, Passes 


‘Equality’ Amendment 


T BE senate last week ad- 
opted the Equal Rights 
amendment to the U. S. Con- 
stitution, but a couple of days 
later friends and foes were still 
trying to figure out who won. 

The amendment, which pur- 
ports to give equal rights to 
women, has long been opposed by 
the CIO because it would mean, 
in the words of Pres. Philip Mur- 
ray, “abandoning the great body 
of laws that protect women work- 
ers from exploitation.” These in- 
clude legislation limiting women’s 
working hours, regulating health 
and other working conditions, 
securing minimum wages, and so- 
cial legislation that applies only 
to women such as maternity aid, 
widow’s pensions and air for de- 
pendent children. 

But the Senate tacked on a 
clause that appears to safeguard 
special legislation protecting 
women and assuring them of fair 
treatment. This appeared in effect 
to nullify the amendment and 
turn it into an equal status bill — 
which the Senate rejected shortly 
before acting on the amendment. 

T he amendment itself, spon- 
sored by Sen. Guy M. Gillette 
(D., la.) and 32 other Senators, 
has been sought by its proponents 
for 27 years. It reads: 

“Equality under the law shall 
not be denied or abridged by the 
United States or any state on 
account of sex. Congress and the 
several states shall have power. 


within their respective jurisdic- 
tions, to enforce this article by 
appropriate legislation.” 

The rider, presented by Sen. 
Carl Hayden (D. Ariz.), added: 

“The provisions of this article 
shall not be construed to impair 
any rights, benefits, or exemp- 
tions, now or here after conferred 
by law upon persons of the fe- 
male sex.” 

The vote on the amendment 
was 63 to 19, or eight votes more 
than the required two-thirds ma- 
jority. The vote on Hayden’s rider 
was 51 to 31. The measure now 
goes to the House, where it must 
win by another two-thirds ma- 
jority. If approved there it must 
be ratified by three-foi^rths of the 
states within seven years before 
it becomes part of the Constitu- 
tion. 

Earlier the Senate defeated an 
equal status bill introduced by 
Sen. Estes Kefauver (D. Tenn.) 
which had the support of CIO. 
This measure would have estab- 
lished a 15-member commission, 
to be appointed by the President, 
to review legal discriminations 
against women and recommend 
legislation to correct them. 

In discussing his bill on the 
floor, Kefauver maintained that 
the Equal Rights amendment 
would eliminate not only such 
things as minimum wage and 
maximum hour laws protecting 
women, but even laws against 
rape and white slavery. His pro- 
posal was defeated by a vote of 
18 to 65. 


Steel Union Gets MMSW 


Canadian Jurisdiction 


yHE EXECUTIVE Council of 
■ the Canadian Congress of La- 
bour at its January meeting in 
Ottawa granted the jurisdiction in 
Canada formerly held by the 
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers 
to the United Steelworkers of 
America, CCL Pres. A. R. Mosher 
announced. 

The Mine-Mill union was ex- 
pelled by CCL last October. The 
CCL temporarily retained juris- 
diction for itself pending the re- 
cent Executive Council determi- 
nation. The council decision is 
subject to confirmation by the 
membership of the locals affected. 

At Washington, D. C., the Mine- 
Mill union has received a hearing 
before a committee named by 
CIO Pres. Murray on charges of 
following the Communist Party 
line and failing to follow CIO 
policy. The committee will report 
to the CIO Executive Board at 
a meeting in Washington Feb. 
14-15. 

“As part of the USA, the work- 
ers will continue to have the full 
support of the CCL as well as the 
support of the 950,000 members of 
the USA in Canada and the 
United States,” said Mosher. 

“The CCL is confident that the 
USA, as one of Canada’s fore- 
most unions, will provide strong 
and efficient service to the men 
in the mines, smelters and plants 
which were at one time under the 
jurisdiction of the Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Workers.” 

M osher ..said the decision 
was particularly important 
to gold miners in the Timmins 
area, who formerly enjoyed col- 
lective bargaining agreements 
since lost under the old jurisdic- 
tion. The CCL reorganized them 
and is now negotiating for con- 
tracts, a task the Steelworkers 
will take over. 

C. H. Millard, Steelworkers na- 


tional director for Canada, wel- 
comed the new members on be- 
half of the 50,060 USA members 
in Canada. 

“Our union has already organ- 
ized completely the iron ore mines 
in Canada and the United States,” 
he said. “The full resources of our 
international union will be placed 
behind the campaign to organize 
the base metal and gold miners. 

“Arrangements will be made to 
set up a Mine and Smelter Work- 
ers division to handle the affairs 
of the new jurisdiction we have 
asked to accept. A staff will be 
recruited from among the miners 
and smelter workers themselves, 
to organize this relatively unor- 
ganized field. Their objective will 
be to establish union standards 
in the industry.” 

yHE EXECUTIVE Council also 
■ took recognition of increas- 
ing unemployment in Canada by 
voting to establish^ an organiza- 
tion of the jobless, having direct 
affiliation with the trader union 
movement. The step is said by the 
CCL to be the first of its kind by 
an established labor organization 
in any country. 

A committee to set up the new 
group consists of Sam Baron, 
Montreal, Canadian director of the 
Textile Workers Union, chairman; 
Alex McAuslane, Vancouver, Oil 
Workers; Murray Cotterill, Steel- 
workers; Joseph Mackenzie, On- 
tario Federation of Labour, and 
Donald MacDonald, CCL. The 
Trades and Labour Congress of 
Canada, the Canadian Catholic 
Confederation of Labour and “any 
other legitimate agency sincerely 
interested in the welfare of the 
unemployed” will be asked to co- 
operate, the council said. 

More than 300,000 Canadian 
workers are now jobless and the 
number is increasing. 


THfe CIO NEWS, JANUARY 30, 19M 


N 


9 





Court Rule state Dept, Pamphlet Shows; 

Aids 150,000 Point Four Will Not Only Help Two-Thirds 

Of Humanity But Will Provide Jobs in U. S. 

thp Ohio SiinrpTYiP Poiirt haic 


■ the Ohio Supreme Court has 
sustained the contention of the 
Ohio CIO Council in an important 
unemployment compensation case. 

The court, in refusing to grant 
a writ of prohibition sought by 
employers’ groups, batted down a 
Big Business attack on jobless 
workers which the Ohio CIO had 
labeled as “morally reprehensible 
and legally unsound.” 

George D. Geyer of Osborn, 
Ohio, a restaurant owner and 
vice president of the Ohio Res- 
taurant Association, had asked 
the court for a writ of prohibi- . 
tion, which would have compelled 
the Bureau of Unemployment 
Compensation to refuse payment 
of benefits, at the new rate, to 
those who were unemployed prior 
to last Aug. 22. 

That was the effective date of 
the new unemployment compen- 
sation act, passed by the Legisla- 
ture, which increased benefits $4 
a week and extended the benefit 
period for an additional four 
weeks. 

Geyer’s attorneys, who repre- 
sent the Ohio Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Ohio Association 
of Manufacturers, took the posi- 
tion that the increases should 
only go to those who filed claims 
after Aug. 22. 

Such a position, the Ohio CIO 
Council said in a friend-of-the- 
court brief, “would not only dis- 
criminate against a class of work- 
ing men, but it would discrimi- 
nate against and penalize those 
working people who most sorely 
need the -additional benefits. It 
needs no demonstration to estab- 
lish that by and large the longer 
an employe is out of remunera- 
tive work, the more he needs ad- 
ditional benefits.” 

Atty-Gen. Herbert S. Duffy, who 
carried the brunt of the battle, 
estimated that 150,000 workers 
would be affected. These 150,000 
had been forced to go without 
additional compensation, granted 
them by the Legislature, for the 
several months the employers* 
case had been before the courts. 
Now barring appeals of individ- 
ual cascrs, they will receive the 
increased benefits. 

Bucks For PAC Are 
Knockout Drops 
To Lick Labor-Hating 
Dixiegops 


Per Capita 



A merican exports aver- 
age $5.80 per person a 
year to developed nations such 
as Canada, the British Isles, 
Western Europe, the Scanda- 
navian countries, Australia 
and New Zealand. 

To nations in the intermediate 
stage of development, like Spain, 
Italy, Eastern Europe, the Soviet 
Union, South Africa and some of 
our South American neighbors, 
they average $1.25. 

But to the underdeveloped areas 
that make up the rest of the, 
world — most of Central and South 
America, Africa and Asia — they 
average but 70c. 

Thus the State Dept, drama- 
tizes, with charts and sketches, 
the cold profit potentialities for 
this country in makipg effective 
Point Four of President Truman’s 
inaugural address in a new pam- 
phlet, “The Point Four Program.” 

I T WAS NOT dollars and jobs 
alone or even primarily that led 
the President to plan on helping 
economically backward nations to 
help themselves. The humanitar- 
ian motive, the simple hope that 
the people who live in such coun- 




FCC’s Denial Of Radio 
Licenses To 2 Papers Upheld 


■|FHE U. S. Circuit Court of Ap- 
■ peals ^last week upheld the 
right of the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission to deny radio 
licenses to newspaper companies 
it found indulged in monopolistic 
practices. 

The appeals were taken by the 
Mansfield (O.) Journal Co. and 
the Lorain (O.) Journal Co., 
which are owned and controlled 
by the same stockholders. Both 
applied for the right to operate 
radio stations. 

The FCC refused a radio sta- 
tion license to the owners because 
it found that the Mansfield Jour- 
nal, only paper in its community, 
“coerced” advertisers by forcing 
them to accept exclusive adver- 
tising contracts with it and not- 
to advertise through the city’s 
only radio station, WMAN. In 
addition, the FCC found, the 
newspaper refused to publish 


WMAN’s programs and made no 
comment about the station unless 
it was unfavorable. 

The conclusion the FCC drew 
from its findings was that this 
conduct was aimed at suppressing 
competition and monopolizing 
mass advertising and news dis- 
semination. Such practices, the 
FFC held, were “likely to con- 
tinue and be reinforced” by op- 
eration of a radio station and 
would be against the public in- 
terest. 

The newspapers in their ap- 
peals maintained the FCC in- 
fringed upon the freedom of the 
press, went beyond its powers by 
studying their competitive activi- 
ties, and in effect found them 
guilty of a crime without trial. 

In an opinion by Judge George 
T. Washington, however, the ap- 
pellate court held that the FCC 
acted fully within its jurisdiction. 


• ^ 


tries might have some of the com- 
forts and conveniences that are 
commonplace to the American 
worker, was at least an equally 
important factor — as it was in the 
thinking of delegates to the 1949 
CIO National Convention who in- 
dorsed Point Four. . 

“Only by helping the least for- 
tunate of its members to help 
themselves,” said the President in 
summarizing Point Four, “can the 
human family achieve the decent, 
satisfying life that is the right 
of all people.” 

The convention resolution as- 
serted that the mechanical mod- 
ernization of industry in the 
undeveloped countries must be 
matched by the modernization of 
workers’ rights. The techniques 
and “know-hows” that we must 
export, it added, have to include 
the minimum wage, collective 
bargaining and the joint settle- 
ment of grievances, for without 
them “the program will not 
achieve the human as well as ma- 
terial gains which are its objec- 
tive.” 

C ONGRESS was asked in June, 
1949, to breath life into Point 
Four by legislation ‘Ho authorize 
an expanded program of technical 
assistance for such areas, and an 
experimental program for en- 
couraging the outflow of private 
investment beneficial to their 
economic development.” 

The original Administration bill 
was unacceptable to Republicans 
on the House Foreign Affairs 
Committee, and a compromise 
drafted by Chairman John Kee 
(D., W. Va.) has been given bi- 
partisan approval. It was intro- 
duced earlier this month. 

“The aid needed falls roughly 
into two categories,” says the 
pamphlet. “Technical, to improve 
food production, health, education 
and productive skills; and finan- 
cial, to develop transportation, 
communications, water control 
and productive industries. 

“Millions of people in Africa, 
the Near and Far East, Central 
and South America, and the is- 
lands of the Caribbean and South 
Pacific have in recent years awak- 
ened to the possibility of a better 
life, and are looking to the United 
States and other democratic na- 
tions, both directly and through 
the United Nations, to help them 
start on the upward climb. 


“The President’s leadership as- 
sures them that they are not look- 
ing in vain. The first year of Point 
Four will prepare the foundation 
and set in motion a vast human 
enterprise extending far into the 
future.” 

T he state Dept, brochure 
shows how the two-thirds of 
the human race occupying under- 
developed areas actually live — “ill- 
clothed, ill-housed, and enfeebled 
by disease and hunger,” and 
illiterate. 

“With modern technical instruc- 
tion and capital investment work- 
ing hand-in-hand, the transition 
from a primitive agricultural 
economy can be made gradually 
to a more productive ec^momy,” 
the State Dept, pointed out on 
the basis of experience. 

“The necessary steps are the 
training of a labor force and the 
modernization of farming, fol- 
lowed by the establishment of in- 
dustries that can use small fac- 
to r i e s economically, such as 


cement plants, textile factories 
and hand tool factories. 

“Accompanying the gradual pro- 
cess, it may be necessary to un- 
dertake the development of roads, 
railroads and waterways, power 
plants, irrigation projects, extrac- 
tive plants to assure a flow of raw 
materials, and establishment of 
channels of distribution. Only 
then will a country be ready to 
undertake industrialization, a goal 
which must be reckoned in terms 
of many preparatory years.” 

The l/.S. and UN technical co- 
operatio.i programs will cost 
about $35,000,000 the first year. 
The U.B. hopes to promote a 
heavy flow of private investment 
funds abroad. 

(Ed. Note: If the underdeveloped 
areas could be developed only to 
half the point already reached by the 
United States, the demand for Amer- 
ican goods produced by American 
workers would be limited only by 
this country’s productive facilities — 
and jobs should be plentiful for an 
indefinite period.) 



10 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 30, 1950 


N 




Potofsky, 
Rieve Hail 
75c Minimum 

T he 75c minimum wage 
which became effective 
Jan. 25 is a token of “economic 
liberation and advancement 
for millions of Americans,” 
Jacob S. Potofsky, chairman of 
the CIO Minimum Wage Com- 
mittee, said in welcoming the 
increase from 40 cents an 
hour. 

While the new rate is “a se- 
vere blow against any renewal 
of sweatshop practices,” the CIO 
will continue to work for event- 
ual advance to $1.00 an hour with 
universal coverage under the law, 
he added. 

“We in the CIO express our 
gratitude,” said Potofsky, who is 
president of the Amalgamated 
Clothing Wofkers, “to President 
Truman, to Labor Secy. Maurice 
Tobin and to that large group of 
forward-looking Senators and 
Representatives who fought a 
valiant legislative campaign in be- 
half of the improved wage law. 

“The Administration, through 
this action, has clearly shown its 
adherence to the platform of the 
1948 campaign; that great liberal 
document attracted the support 
of millions' of wage-earners 
throi^hout the nation. 

“It is, in fact, a tribute to the 
effectiveness of American union- 
ism that only 11 ^ million workers 
in interstate commerce will have 
their wages increased through the 
application of the new minimum 
wage. Through the collective bar- 
gaining process, unions have won 
basic wages far in advance of 75 
cents an hour for the great ma- 
jority of American workers. 

“Were it not for the effective- 
ness of the collective bargaining 
process, our wage level today 
would be far lower and the degree 
of exploitation in American in- 
dustry far more serious. 

“In behalf of the CIO, with its 
millions of members, I pledge con- 
tinuing activity to constantly 
achieve a better balance between 
the wages of American workers 
and increasing productive effi- 
ciency of our great industrial ma- 
chinery. 

“I also pledge to the millions 
of workers in the lowest income 
brackets that we in the CIO will 
work unceasingly for further im- 
provement and extension of the 
coverage of the Federal Wage 
Hour Law. We will not give up 
the struggle until poverty is 
banished from the American 
scene.” 

Pres. Emil Rieve of the Textile 
Workers Union described the leg- 
islation as “the greatest single 
safeguard against depression 
erected since the end of the war” 
but like Potofsky claimed the min- 
imum should be set at $1. 

President Truman hailed the 
law as “a measure dictated by 
justice . . . founded on the belief 
that full human dignity requires 
at least a minimum level of eco- 
nomic sufficiency and security.” 

Probe Of Segregation 

Rep. Jacob K. Javits (Rep.-L. 
N. Y.) has introduced a resolution 
calling for an investigation of 
segregation and discrimination in 
the armed services as the basis 
of race, creed, color or nationeil 
origin. Javits asked for a special 
committee of 19, to report by 
June 1. In support of his request, 
Javits said “nothing could be 
more useful as propaganda ma- 
terial to the Communists than 
the persistent charges of segrega- 
tion and discrimination.” 


Story of Store’s Labor Dispute Eight Jailed 

^ F or Striko 

Costs Paper Heavy Ad Loss Action In ’48 


T he PORTLAND Oregonian, 
one of the Northwest’s 
largest newspapers, is learning 
the hard way that not every- 
body agrees a newspaper’s job 
is to print the news as it 
comes. 

It printed a detailed account of 
the intermediate report of Thomas 
Wilson, NLRB examiner, finding 
the Meier & Frank Co., a large 
department store and the news- 
paper’s heaviest advertising space 
purchaser, guilty of unfair labor 
practices in a dispute involving 
an AFL clerk’s union. 

The store promptly pulled out 
the bulk of its advertising, includ- 
ing about pages already in 
type. 

The Portland Journal, which 
printed a less detailed account of 
Wilson’s findings, just as promptly 
found its columns bulging with 
Meier & Frank ads it had pre- 
viously sought in vain. 

Labor and liberal organizations 
promptly leaped to the Ore- 
gonian’s defense and accused the 
store of an attack on the free 
press. 

■|PHE CIO Portland Newspaper 
■ Guild, representing editorial 
employes of both papers and also 
Journal circulation workers, hit 
at the “use of economic pressure” 
by Meier & Frank and warned 
that “news suppressed or warped 
to please an advertiser is not 
news.” 

“A threat of economic power by 
an advertiser against a newspa- 
per,” said the Guild in a resolu- 
tion, “is a danger not only to the 
newspaper directly affected but 


also to all others in the area be- 
yond.” 

The store has long resisted the 
clerks’ union efforts to organize 
its employes. Following the loss 
of an NLRB election the union 
filed charges of unfair labor prac- 
tices, including intimidation of 
employes. 

Wilson in his intermediate re- 
port found the firm has acted un- 
fairly by questioning employes in 
regard to their union membership 
or sentiment and iij forbidding 
solicitation of membership in a 
discriminatory fashion. 

The trial examiner recom- 
mended that the store be required 
to cease interfering with efforts 
of the employes to organize, that 
interrogation be prohibited and 
that the ban on solicitation bq 
ended until a reasonable and non- 
discriminatory regulation, aimed 
at preventing interference with 
store operation, be set up. 

The first stories carried were 
in effect a preview of Wilson’s 
findings. The Journal printed a 
brief summary, the Oregonian a 
more detailed account which in- 
cluded the background and state- 
ments by the principals. The next 
day Meier & Frank cancelled sev- 
eral Oregonian advertisements al- 
ready in type. 

A COUPLE of days later the 
text of the trial examiner’s 
report was made public and the 
Oregonian published an account. 
More ads were cancelled the same 
day. The Journal bypassed the 
story in its city edition and then 
ran a follow-up on its original 
story to the effect that some 
charges would be dropped. This 
was based on Wilson’s finding 


that Aaron M. Frank, president of 
the company, was within his 
rights in making a speech oppos- 
ing the union. 

The Oregonian published a Page 
1 statement briefly outlining the 
situation in which it stated that 
Meier & Frank had not informed 
the newspaper of the reason for 
“this sudden and drastic curtail- 
ment of space.” 

“As a matter of traditional pol- 
icy,” the statement said, “the Ore- 
gonian strives to report the news 
completely, impartially and with- 
out fear or favor. The Oregonian 
9will continue to do so. We invite 
the patronage of those who ap- 
prove this policy.” 

F rank floundered badly in 
his attempts togustify his posi- 
tion. At first he told the United 
_ Press that the space cut was due 
to snow. The next day, when re- 
minded that the store's Journal 
advertising had jumped remark- 
ably, he withdrew that statement 
and replaced it with one saying 
that the placing of ads had noth- 
ing to do with the publication of 
news. 

He also spoke vaguely about ex- 
periments with “new techniques” 
in advertising, then relapsed into 
silence when asked to reconcile 
his statement with the cancella- 
tion of many columns of adver- 
tising already in type. 

Editor & Publisher, weekly pub- 
lication of the newspaper indus- 
try, rose to the situation nobly 
and with enviable finesse. It suc- 
ceeded in staunchly defending the 
Oregonian and at the same time 
raising not the faintest shadow 
of condemnation against the 
Journal. 


Organizationally Speakini 


By ALLAN S. HAYWOOD 

The California State CIO Council charter has 
been revoked. The committee designated to hear 
charges^ made its report to Pres. Murray, citing 
flagrant abuses of authority and violation of CIO 
policy by the officers of the Council. 

Pres. Murray ordered the revocation of the Cali- 
fornia State CIO Council charter 
Jan. 25, 1950. Richard Leonard 
was appointed coordinator of the 
^gaffairs of the Council in the inter- 
Ifest of the CIO membership in Cali- 
. fornia and in conformity with CIO 
policy. Brother Leonard will have 
ijthe assistance of an advisory com- 
Imittee of 20 leaders and members 
jof CIO affiliates within the State. 

The ex-officers of the Council re- 
sorted to various means of subter- 
fuge in an attempt to delay the hearings, but these 
attempts did not work. In the findings of the com- 
mittee, the Council’s own record, taken from the 
letters, statements and publications, was the basis 
of conviction. These ex-officers had used the Coun- 
cil to achieve their own ends, they supported the 
third party, and went so far as to support the 
communist paper, “Peoples’ World.” They defied 
CIO policy consistently, following the Communist 
Party line, this being consistent with the actions 
of all slaves of the Soviet Union. These ex-officers 
have been given the opportunity to comply with 
the decision handed down or to appeal to the 
CIO Executive Board. True to form they have re- 
sorted to their usual tactics to prevent CIO mem- 
bers from taking over the Council and institutions 
by creating a phony set-up to take possession of 
the “Labor Herald.” The National CIO will en- 
deavor to restore to the workers that which prop- 
erly belongs to them. 

By the time this is published, the writer will be 
in Puerto Rico, attending a big meeting of the 
workers there, at which time he will present a 
charter from the CIO to the workers of Puerto 
Rico. The CIO will extend every assistance possible 
to establish a strong trade-union movement in 
Puerto Rico, one that will be of great benefit to all 


the workers. This charter is being granted at the 
request of Pres. Thomas Mendes, of the General 
Confederation of Labor, Inc. The writer will re- 
port later the happenings there and his observa- 
tions. 

The Communications Workers of America-CIO 
(telephone workers) are preparing for strike action. 
True to form, the AT&T and its subsidiaries are 
resisting proper collective bargaining for the work- 
ers in this industry. Pres. Beirne, CWA-CIO, spoke 
oyer the radio on the ABC network explaining the 
just and reasonable demands of the telephone 
workers. Pres. Murray will deliver an important 
radio broadcast on Wednesday, Feb. 1, over the 
ABC network. His speech will be heard at 9:30 
p.m.. Eastern time; 8:30 p.m.. Central time; 8:30 
p.m.. Mountain time, and 9 p.m., Pacific time. 
Pres. Murray’s speech will be well worth hearing 
and should prove of very considerable assistance 
to the CIO telephone workers. I suggest that you 
tune in. To Pres. Beirne and associates everywhere, 
the CIO will be with you and will render every 
possible assistance to bring abput the realization 
of your just demands. 

The United Automobile Workers-CIO were forced 
to call a strike at the CTirysler Corporation, because 
the company failed to meet the union’s proper de- 
mands and objectives. The UAW-CIO has the full 
and complete support of the National CIO in 
this action to realize their just demands. 

CIO reg. Dir. Ben Henry reports that the UAW- 
CIO was victorious in a representation election at 
the Lattner Manufacturing Co., Cedar Rapids, la., 
by a vote of 25 to 2. 

CIO Sub-Reg. Dir. John J. Maurillo reports that 
in a representation election at the Railway Bearing 
Co., Syracuse, N. Y., the UAW-CIO was victorious 
by a vote of 1J5 to 83. Francis X. O’Mealia, UAW 
Sub-Regional Director, conducted the drive. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Irwin DeShetler reports that in a 
union security election held at the North American 
Aviation plant, Los Angeles, Calif., the workers 
voted in favor of the UAW-CIO by 6800 yes, 1508 no. 

CIO State Dir. William Smith reports that the 
United Transport Service Employes won a 3 to 1 
victory in a NLRB election at the Piedmont Leaf 
Tobacco Co., Winston Salem, N. C. • ^ * / 


T he wheels of Georgia 
justice sometimes take pe- 
culiar turns. 

Last week they went off on 
a tangent. As a result of a 
ruling by the Georgia Su- 
preme Court, eight CIO Tex- 
tile Worker members were 
jailed for an offense they did 
not commit and for which they 
had never been tried, TWUA 
attorneys said. 

To support their contention, the 
lawyers quote U. S. Supreme 
Court Justice Hugo Black, who 
said the eight were “denied due 
process of law.” 

Black commented on the case 
when the union sought unsuccess- 
fully Jan. 19 to have the Supreme 
Court consider an appeal from 
the action of the Georgia Su- 
preme Court. 

The case arose from a 1948 dis- 
pute between TWUA and the 
Celanese Corp. of America, mak- 
ers of synthetic yarn. That year 
the union negotiated a 15-cent 
hourly increase for the industry. 
Celanese agreed to the raise at its 
Cumberland, Md., plant and said 
that when the Rome, Ga., con- 
tract expired later in the year, 
it would put the raise into effect 
there. 

When the contract expired, how- 
ever, the company offered 10 
cents and refused to submit the 
issue to arbitration, union attor- 
neys said. 

The workers struck and stayed 
out until December, 1948, when 
the company agreed to pay the 
15 cents. 

During the strike, the company 
got an injunction limiting pickets 
to two and forbidding “intimida- 
tion and coercion.” The workers 
ignored the order and scores were 
arrested. When the strike was 
settled, the eight men now in 
jail had been found guilty, fined 
and given sentences of from 10 
to 20 days. 

As is customary, the terms of 
the strike settlement included an 
agreement by the company to 
drop court action and to rein- 
state all workers without preju- 
dice. 

Since the charge was “civil con- 
tempt,” the action became mean- 
ingless when the injunction was 
removed, the union claimed. The 
judge, however, refused to mod- v 
ify the penalties he had imposed. **-■/ 

TWUA attorneys believed the 
case looked like an easy, one to 
win on appeal because the men 
had been found “guilty of civil 
contempt.” The Georgia Su- 
preme Court ruled, however, that 
the men were guilty of “criminal 
contempt.” The men had never 
been accused or tried for criminal 
contempt. 

Although the jail sentences are 
brief, the company says it won’t 
take the men back when they are 
released. 

TWUA Pres. Emil Rieve, in a 
letter to all members of Con- 
gress, reviewed the case and 
pointed out that the Celanese 
instance is by no means unique, 
especially in the South. 

He said the only remedy is to 
remove from state courts the 
power to issue injunctions in 
labor disputes affecting inter- 
state commerce. 


Bucks For PAC Are 
Knockout Drops 
To Lick Labor-Hating 
i < I .Dixiogops , 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 30, 1930 


11 


Union To Congressioiial Committee: 


Steel Must Bear Responsibility For Price Rise 


By HENRY C. FLEISHER 

T he NATION’S big steel in- 
dustry showed a “public 
be hanged” attitude when it 
jacked up prices by more than 
$4 a ton last December. 

• Those steel price increases 
were “unwarranted,” “indefen- 
sible” and “far in excess of 
any demonstrable cost In- 
creases” from pensions or any- 
thing else. 

• The CIO United Steel- 
workers of America is getting 
mighty “tired of being a public 
whipping boy for this industry 
— especially when we are 
charged with responsibility for 
things which we have not 
done.” 

These were some of the points 
heard by the Congressional Joint 
Committee on the Economic Re- 
port last week from Otis Bru- 
baker, USA-CIO research director, 
who represented Pres. Philip Mur- 
ray at a Washington investigation 
of the steel price hike. 

The pension - and - welfare pro- 
gram won by the United Steel- 
workers, Brubaker pointed out — 


with facts and figures — was not 
responsible for the industry’s lat- 
est jab at steel consumers. 

“The cost of pensions and social 
insurance will not approach the 
additional revenues which will be 
derived from the price increases 

Newsprint 
Probe Soon 

T he steel and newsprint 
industries will undergo 
<he scrutiny of Rep. Emanuel 
Celler’s monopoly investigating 
subcommittee later this month, 
and meanwhile Celler’s group 
will consider three specific 
bills to strengthen federal 
anti-monopoly measures. 

As a result of earlier hearings 
on the nature of concentration in 
U. S. industry, the subcommittee 
will meet and act on proposals: 

To increase criminal penalties 
under the anti-trust laws from 
$5,000 to $50,000 and lengthen pos- 
sible imprisonment penalties. 

To require the Justice Dept, to 
report to Congress periodically on 
what is happening to consent de- 
crees entered into to settle anti- 
trust cases, which Celler said may 
be “of highest importance to our 
economy.” 

And to put teeth into the Webb- 
Pomerene act so that it can’t be 
used by combinations of exporters 
to make trade agreements effec- 
tive here as well as abroad. 

The monopoly subcommittee has 
asked the House for $75,000 to 
carry on its studies, and Celler 
expressed hope that it would get 
“some” of the money. 

Celler, disclosing his plans Jan. 
24, said that the newsprint situ- 
ation is serious. ANG-CIO asked 
for the investigation. 

12 


and from demonstrable cost sav- 
ings,” Brubaker fiatly charged. 

Some facts offered to the com- 
mittee about the business of mak- 
ing and selling steel: 

1 The latest $4-plus price in- 

* crease will bring the industry 
an additional $264 million. 

2 A drop in the price of scrap 

* steel — a big factor in the mak- 
ing of steel — saves the industry 
about $400 million a year. Drops 
in the prices of non-ferrous met- 
als and fuel oil save the steelmak- 
ers an additional $80 million — 
these more than offset slight rises 
in transportation and other minor 
costs. 

2 Higher productivity and other 

* savings — together with the 
savings on scrap, etc. — would 
permit the industry easily to ab- 
sorb the cost of pensions and wel- 
fare, while lowering the price of 
steel. 

B rubaker appeared before the 
joint group of Senators and 
Representatives in a crowded 
hearing room at the House Office 
Building in Washington. He was 
followed to the stand by Don 
Montgomery, Washington repre- 
sentative of the CIO Auto Work- 

CIO Council Is 
Set Up For D.C. 

John Brophy, CIO Councils Di- 
rector, has announced that his 
office is setting up a separate Dis- 
trict of Columbia Council. Pre- 
viously the Maryland and D. C. 
Councils had been combined. 

Brophy said the change was 
made because of the dissimilarity 
of political and legislative prob- 
lems in the District and Mary- 
land. 

The new body will be known as 
the District of Columbia Indus- 
trial Union Council and will fight 
for the vote in D. C. 


ers, who also criticized the steel 
price increase. 

The CIO union witnesses offered 
sharp and effective rebuttal to 
Ben Fairless of U. S. S^eel and a 
string of other industry execu- 
tives. The corporation men tried, 
without too much success, to 
blame the union’s pension-welfare 
program for the rise in steel 
prices. 

Big Steel’s Fairless estimated 
that the pension-welfare program 
would cost the corporation someu. 
$64 million a year — though it was 
not altogether clear how that fig- 
ure had been arrived at. 

Flanked by some 20 corporation 
top-level executives, Fairless tried 
to give the impression that poor 
old U. S. Steel was getting by on 
a shoe string. 

U NDER SOME sharp question- 
ing by Sen. Joseph O’Mahoney 
(D. Wyo.), Fairless said that “in 
my opinion U. S. Steel has not 
made a fair return on its sales or 
investment at any time during 
the last 20 years.” 

This picture of the giant cor- 
poration struggling to make both 
ends meet was challenged in fig- 
ures presented by the USA-CIO. 

Brubaker said that the com- 
pany’s accounting practices tend 
to hide about $30 million in prof- 
its each year. Even so, the com- 
pany reported $129 million after 
taxes in 1948, and its return on 
investment has averaged about a 
solid 7% during the post-war 
years. 

He recalled that the Fact-Find- 
ing Board appointed last summer 
by Pres. Truman had found that 
steel industry could meet the 
union’s demands without price in- 
creases, while still maintaining a 
high level of profits. 

“The steel companies must bear 
the sole responsibility for their 
price actions,” the union official 
said, for the union made no deal 
“covertly beneath the bargaining 
table” concerning price problems. 
Now, he said, the company “has 


tried again to blame the SteeK 
workers for this latest unwar- 
ranted increase in its prices.” 

A LOOK at the record during 
the past several years, Bru- 
baker went on, will show that the 
union’s wage increases and other 
gains were merely a handy excuse 
for the company to raise prices. 

Since December 1944, the steel 
industry has jacked up the price 
of steel between 58.3% and 60.1% 
— in seven “clearly defined” ac- 
tions. 

“Usually,” he pointed out, “the 
pattern has been two price in- 
creases for .each wage increase — 
one price increase before the wage 
incl-ease and one after.” 

And the biggest wage increase 
was followed by the smallest price 
increase. 

-A curious thing about prices in 
the steel industry, Brubaker re- 
marked, is the way everybody 
follows the lead of U. S. Steel — 
a “policy which leaves the Amer- 
ican people at the mercy of U. S. 
Steel Corp. so far as steel prices 
go.^ 

“This may well not be |hon- 
opoly as defined^ in our anti-trust 
laws, but it certainly produces the 
same offspring. 

“We are convinced that the 
price system now used is not the 
product of competition, and that 
it does not produce' prices which 
bear a'ny necessary relation to 
costs. This is not a healthy situa- 
tion for our economy.” 



Board Meets 
Feb. 14-15 


The CIO Executive Board, 
comprising 50 members, will 
meet in Washington on Feb. 
14-15. 

The Board meeting will be 
preceded by a session of the 
CIO vice-presidents on Feb. 13. 


I F THE VARIOUS steel compan- 
ies wanted real competition, the 
union economist added, there have 
been many opportunities for them 
to start competing — but they 
haven’t. 

“If Youngstown Sheet & Tube, 
and other companies in this in- 
dustry, were directly interested in 
price competition, here was a 
beautiful opportunity to take 
business away from ‘competitors’ 
by refusing to raise prices — or by 
raising them by a lower amount. 

“As you know, however, those 
companies weren’t interested. 

“They literally fell all over 
themselves trying to get their 
prices increased to the identical 
prices quoted by U. S. Steel, with- 
out a moment’s delay.” 

(As a matter of fact, some steel 
makers want even higher prices. 
Ben M'orreel of Jones & Laugh- 
lin told reporters he^d like to 
to raise prices again as soon as 
‘Hhe competitive situation*^ per- 
mits it. Usually, competition 
means lower prices.) 

T he CIO steelworkers have 
fought a “mainly defensive” 
battle against infiation since the 
war, Brubaker added. 

“It has been an effort to keep 
industry from .throwing us into 
a depression by siphoning off 
more profit than the system would 
bear. We want, and we must have, 
lower prices. 

“We sincerely regret the action 
taken by this industry. It may 
well mean higher prices for many 
steel products and may endanger 
economic stability. 

“We challenge the industry to 
lay the full facts on the table be- 
fore you and the American peo- 
ple. We urge you to continue this 
investigation until you find an 
answer. 

“Bui you, and we, must find an 
answer — or resign ourselves to 
‘boom and bust’ and the eventual 
physical and moral bankruptcy 
of our system of free enterprise.” 

Greetings 
To Histadrut 

Fraternal greetings were sent 
last week by the CIO to His- 
tadrut, the General Federation of 
Jewish Labor in Palestine, on the 
29th anniversary of its organiza- 
tion. 

“These 29 years have shown 
tremendous progress not only for 
labor in Israel but for your en- 
tire nation,” said the message 
signed by Jacob S. Potofsky, 
chairman of the CIO-Israel-Ameri- 
can Committee and president of 
the Amalgamated Clothing Work- 
ers. “Today, with more than a 
quarter-million members who 
with their ffimilies represent 
more than half the population of 
Israel, you represent a positive 
force for democracy not only in 
Israel but throughout the entire 
Middle East. 

“The CIO, which has always 
looked with brotherly pride on 
your accomplishments, hopes that 
in your 30th year, Histadrut will 
continue its magnificent accom- 
plishment on behalf of the eco- 
nomic and social welfare of your 
membership.” 

Bucks For PAG Are 
Knockout Drops 
To Lick Labor-Hating 
Dixiegops 



1 1*1# 



BILL 

r f vui cy 

WHAT IT DOES 

WHERE IT IS 

WHAT TO DO 

Fair Employment 
Practices Commission 
S. 1728 

HR 4453 

Bars discrimination in 
industry based on race, 
creed or color; provides 
penalties for job bias. 

Senate bill on calendar, 
may come -.up next 
month. House support- 
ers seeking to get bill 
on floor for debate. 

Write, wire Senators, 
Congressmen to sup- 
port and seek earliest 
possible vote. 

Middle-Income 

Housing Bill 

S. 2246 

HR 6618 

Provides for long-term, 
low-interest U. S. loans 
to co-ops for building 
moderate - cost housing 
projects, etc. 

Senate Banking Com- 
mittee has completed 
hearings; House hear- 
ings started Jan. 30. 

Ask Senators, Congress- 
men to give bill full 
support. 

Social Security 
Improvements 

HR 6000 

Extends, improves old 
age, survivors benefits, 
etc., under social se- 
curity. Lifts benefits, 
ups coverage by 11 
million. 

Passed House last ses- 
sion. Senate Finance 
Comm, now holding 
hearings. CIO to ask 
further improvements 
in House bill. 

Ask Senators to try to 
strengthen HR 6 0 0 0 
over present provisions. 

Federal Aid 

To Education 

S. 248 

Provides over $300 mil- 
lion aid to states for 
schools ; gives states 
broad power to super- 
vise use of funds. 

Bill, approved by CIO, 
has passed Senate. Has 
been stuck in House La- 
bor Comm, for months. 

Ask members of House 
Labor Comm, to ok 
Senate bill. 

Labor Extension 

Service Bill 

S. 110 

HR 1380 

Provides workers’ edu- 
cation program in coop- 
eration with schools, 
unions, Labor Dept. 

Approved b y Senfite 
Labor Comm. House 
Labor Comm, is still 
studying bill. 

Ask Senators, Congress- 
^men to seek early pas- 
sage. 

Mundt-Ferguson 

Bill 

S. 2311 

Bill endangers civil lib- 
. erties, union rights — 
under guise of fighting 
subversive activities. 

CIO opposed bill at 
hearings last year. Sen- 
ate Judiciary Comm, 
may bring out revised 
bill. 

.^sk Senators to oppose 
bill as dangerous to 
civil rights. 

(Address all Senators at Senate Office Building, Washington 25, D. C, 

Address all Representatives at House Office Building, Washington 25, D. C.) 


THE CIO NEWS, JANUARY 30, 1950 


N 


PUBtisAmH; 

Al fbs 

com^^REss Of 
i || D U $ T R i A L 
Q^GANiZAflOHS 


A tt*R 

Sc a ikpMt-S8 i Ksif Jn t^iato 





iVol. XIII 


WASHINGTON. D. C.. FEBRUARY 6. 1950 


No. 6 



PICKETLESS STRIKE: Two policemen maintain a lonely vigil few locals in other parts of the country maintained token 

outside a gate of the Chrysler plant in Detroit. CIO Auto pickets. Eighty-nine thousand UAW members walked out Jan, 

Worker pickets were conspicuous by their absence as the union 27 when the company refused union pension demands. (For, 

adopted a new walkout technique — “picketless striking.” A story and another picture please turn to page 3.) - - 






A NATION-WIDE campaign 
Ui behalf of fair employ- 
mernt practices in industry was 
launched in Pittsburgh Jan. 29 
in the first of a series of meet- 
ings by the Civil Rights Com- 
mittee of the United Steel- 
workers of America, CIO. 

Highlighted by an address by 
CIO and USA Pres. Philip Mur- 
ray, the meeting was attended by 
490 delegates from local unions in 
Wyr^tern Pennsylvania, Ohio, West 
Vkig^inia and eastern New York. 

Petitions were circulated with 
the object of securing a half-mil- 
lion signatures demanding imme- 
diate enactment by Congress of a 
Fair Employment Practice Law. 
Similar petitions will be given 
delegates attending meetings in 
Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadel- 
phia and Birmingham. 

**1*4 this great era of progress 
in thfc/ arts and sciences, it doesn't 
make sense that we are pleading 
with Congress for fair play, for 
equality of treatment for all men,” 
Murray said. 

OF THE great obstacles 
our country faces today is 
the •olution of this problem. It 
has been partially solved in most 
of !lie organized industries 
throUirh the labor movement and 
partkrtilarly by CIO. It is the duty 
and obligation of our organiza- 
tion, the United Steelworkers, and 
oil other right-thinking people to 
promote a constructive campaign 
that has for its ultimate goal the 
rumination of all evils of discrim- 
Inatinn. 

•KInt of this meeting we hope to 
fftmetmie a greater interest so 

Paul Styles 
Is Named 
To NLRB 

AUL STYLES of Atlanta, 
Ga., was named last week 
to oerve a five-year term as 
a member of the five-man Na- 
ticmal Labor Relations Board. 

A one-time AFL local official, 
Sti^s was appointed by Pres. Tru- 
irvm to succeed J. Copeland Gray, 
wbgv had completed a two-year 
mt/Aafsership on the NLRB. Gray 
hart been under heavy attack from 
unions for his consistently anti- 
labor decisions. 

Styles had served as Atlanta re- 
gional director of the Board for 
the past four years. He first went 
to work with the agency in 1937, 
and served for two years with the 
War Labor 'Board. 

The new appointee is 42 years 
old. He has had a variety of jobs 
as a printer, cottchi mill worker, 
newspaperman and union official. 

A MEMBER of the typographi- 
cal union, he is a former 
president of the AFL Trades & 
Labor Council in Huntsville, Ala., 
his home town. He was also a 
co-chairman of the Chamber of 
Commerce Industrial Commission 
in that city. 

At other times he worked in the 
cotton mills and as reporter-edi- 
tor - and - typesetter of a weekly 
paper. 

Washington observers believe 
that Styles' appointment . may 
bring about a more liberal tone 
in NLRB decisions. Gray fre- 
quently voted with two other 
conservative members of the 
Board to produce a long string of 
3-2 decisions against labor. 


STEELWORKERS (above) at 
Pittsburgh launch a campaign 
to arouse sentiment for the 
FEPC Bill. (Right) some of 
the speakers at the meeting: 
1. to r., Rep. Eberharter, Judge 
Hower S. Brown, and Reps. 
Davenport and Buchanan. The 
three Congressmen are Penn- 
sylvania Democrats. 

that necessary Congressional ac- 
tion, will be taken.” 

He cautioned the delegates that 
it is not sufficient to attend meet- 
ings and then go home and forget 
it. 

“Sometimes we express sympa- 
thy to these Godly objectives but 
do little or nothing about them,” 
Murray continued. “There are 
many enemies to be met. Witness 
the debacle in Congress where a 
diabolical attempt is made to pre- 
vent the subject, .even being dis- 
cussed on the floor, by a coalition 
of evil forces. , 

“The proposed legislation hits 
at the evils of discrimination in 
industry, but there is even a 
larger issue and that is civil 
rights — the^ God-given right of 
every man to eiijoy equality of 
treatment. The most crucial strug- 
gle ahead of us is this rnatter of 
a man not being afforded equality 


of treatment because his skin is 
dark. 

“Every man, woman and child 
is a child of God and no matter 
what a man’s creed he ^Jiould 
join forces to eliminate these 
evils. 

“We cannot let the 81st Con- 
gress adjourn without a declara- 
tion against discrimination. The 
people of the United States are 
all right but there is a great deal 
of ignorance about this question. 
This, organization can do more to 
educate the people in the next 
few months than all the lobbying 
through the ages.” 

I^URBAY SAID the Steelwork- 
ers might go on the radio 
Feb. 12 in connection with the 
campaign. He noted that day was 
Lincoln’s birthday and remarked: 

“Do you think that Abraham 
Lincoln, a Republican, would team 


up with the Dixiecrats if he were 
here today?” 

He praised President Truman 
for his courageous fight and de- 
clared the President will keep 
up the battle “until the day when 
we no longer have this problem.” 

Other speakers at me one-day 
conference were Judge Homer S. 
Brown, Reps. H. J. Davenport, 
Frank Buchanan and Herman P. 
Eberharter. In the morning ses- 
sion James G. Thimmes, USA 
vice-president, and James J. 
Thomas, Homestead district di- 
rector of the union, and Roy Wil- 
kins, secretary of the National 
Association for Advancement of 
Colored People, addressed the 
delegates. 

Thomas Shane, union director 
in Detroit, is chairman of the 
Civil Rights Committee of the 
United Steelworkers. 


Dixie Demos 
‘W alkaround^ 

FEPC Bill 

F ebruary l was Calendar 
Wednesday in the House. 
Calendar Wednesday is a 
day on \vhidh the chairman of 
any House committee can caU 
for action on a bill approved 
by his group, providing it is 
on the House calendar, regard- 
less of whether the powerful 
Rules Committee has acted on 
it. 

It is likewise one of the avenues 
down which backers of legislation 
for a Fair Employment Practices 
Commission hope to drive their 
bill to a showdown vote. Last 
Wednesday, as on the previous 
Wednesday, they got caught in a 
traffic jam caused by Southern 
Congressmen bent on giving the 
FEPC the walkaround. 

(The walkaround is a dignified 
slow motion version of the runaround. 
The Southern Congressmen who op- 
pose FEPC leave their seats, walk 
slowjy off the floor and stand in the 
door counting noses. When the noses 
are few enough, one of their number 
left behind demands a quorum call. 
That takes up half an hour. Enodgk 
quorum calls and the first tbin|^ 
you know Calendar W’cdnesday has 
become just a plain, old Thursday, 
with a different set of rules.) 

The House committees are 
called alphabetically, so that each 
chairman can call for any bill 
on the calendar. There wasn’t 
much possibility of getting down 
to the Labor Committee on Feb. 
1, but Chairman Lesinski (D. 
Mich.) — whose committee has re- 
ported the FEPC bill to the Rules 
committee — wasn’t taking any 
chances. He was there bright 
and early, 

^HE ANTI-FEPC block likewise 
■ wasn’t taking any chances. It 
went into its pedestrian filibuster 
right off the bat. First Rep. 
Davis (D., of Ga.) took a look 
around and forced a roll call. The 
required 218 members eventually 
answered up, and half an hour 
was gone. . Rep. Marcantonip 
(ALP, N. Y.) demanded action 
on Calendar Wednesday and in- 
sisted nothing else was in order. 
Rep. Williams (D., Miss.) there- 
upon hit the jackpot. 

First he moved to disregard 
Calendar Wednesday. He lost by 
a voice vote. Then he called for 
a standing, or counted, vote. He 
lost again, 138 to 28, but the tally 
revealed lack of a quorum. A 
quorum became automatic under 
House rules. More than enough 
Congressmen showed up to an- 
swer, and Williams’ motion lost 
again, 271 to 104. But a lot of 
time had lurched on. 

The House got off to a fre^h 
start. Chairman Spence (D., Ky.) 
of the Banking and Currency 
Committee, first on the list, called 
up a minor amendment to the 
housing laws. He asked for 
unanimous consent to dispense 
with reading it, a normal pro- 
cedure usually adopted to save 
time. But not on Calendar 
Wednesday. Davis objected and 
it was read. Another 20 minutes 
gone. 

Spence began to discuss the 
bill. The Southern members, one 
by one, in pairs and in groups, 
walked off the floor until Rep, 
Rivers (D., S. C.) was practically 
the only one left from below the 
Maspn-Dixon -Line. While they 
ppeked. jn from the cloakroomSf 
Riversr— 

You guessed right. He said 
there wasn’t a quorum on the 
floor. 

' And so It went, right up until 
adjournment. 


Steel Union, Aided By CIO News, 
Gets Action In Safety Campaign 


By AL ZACK 

■UlILITANT ACTION by the Steelworkers and 
exposure by the CIO News of shocking disre- 
gard for human life on the part of Wheeling Steel 
Co. officials led to almost instant action by the 
company. 

The CIO News, on Jan. 2, 1950, detailed an almost 
incredible story of management’s refusal to heed 
repeated warnings by Steelworkers Local 1190 at 
the Mingo Junction (Ohio) plant of the company. 

As a result of the* disregarded warnings, one man 
was killed and another seriously injured when 160 
square feet of steel roofing, weighted down by 14 
inches of flue dust, collapsed. 

I OCAL UNION OFFICIALS, with the cooperation 
" of Steelworker District Dir. Paul Rusen, de- 
manded instant action and concrete assurance that 
such a disaster would never recur. 

When . top management met with union officials, 
Local 1190 officers pulled out a copy of the CIO 
News containing the Mingo Junction story. 

As red-faced management representatives squirmed 
in their chairs, the union spokesmen read the CIO 
News story, word for word. 

Hard on the heels of this meeting came top man- 
agement action — ^too late to save the life of John 
Stoddard or the suffering of Ralph DeBacco. 

Jess Sivard, safety director for the Mingo Junction 
and Steubenville plants of the. company for the last 
39 years, was fired. 

John Tapman, general superintendent of the South 
Division — the plant where the disaster occured— :^also 
was fired. He had been superintendent for the last 
half dozen years. 



The new safety director, promising a program of 
complete cooperation with the union’s safety com- 
mittee, instituted mass meetings where union officials 
spoke, bluntly detailing the safety needs demanded 
by the workers. 

I^EANWHILE the Ohio CIO Council, in a radio 
”■ script used widely throughout the state, laid 
part of the blame for accidents of this nature on the 
shoulders of the State of Ohio. 

Pointing out that adequate inspections by state 
factory and building inspectors could have averted 
the tragedy, the State CIO charged that there were 
only 30 men on the state’s payroll to handle such 
inspections 

Of these 30, three inspect nothing but scaffolding 
and two inspect nothing but pressure piping. 

The other 25 are charged with inspecting all the 
factories in the state, as well as the public buildings, 
schools, hospitals, etc. 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 6, 1960 


N 



2 


Only Ghosts of Past Picket in Chrysler Strike 


O LD-TIME CIO Auto work- 
ers, veterans of rough 
and tumble organizing drives 
in the auto industry, must rub 
their eyes and take a second 
look when they wander around 
strike-bound Chrysler plants 
these days. 

The plants are still there, the 
fences remain, clerical help comes 
and goes, but one factor always 
associated with strikes is missing. 
There are no pickets! 

Instead of picketing, UAW mem- 
bers are spending their time 
helping their wives with house 
cleaning, doing needed repair 
jobs around the house, and in 
general following a course of 
watchful waiting. 

So far there has been no break 
in the strike picture. Federal Con- 
ciliators are in Detroit but there 
has been .no demand for their 
services. 

I DCAL 844 in San Leandro, 
" Calif., reports that on the 
first day of the strike there was 
"one character who had an idea 
that he was going to work. He 
changed his mind when a com- 
pany foreman ordered him to 
scram!’' 

One day before the strike was 


$1 Assessment 
Voted For 
Strike 

The CIO Auto Workers’ Ex- 
ecutive Board has voted to^ levy 
an emergency strike assessment 
of $1 a week for up to 12 weeks 
on all employed members of the 
union. 

The assessment will become 
effective if the strike in progress 
at the Chrysler Corp. plants 
continues for more than two 
weeks. 

The strike support vote by 
the board was made possible 
by action of the UAW-CIO con- 
vention last July. At that time, 
the convention by a near-unani- 
mous vote gave authority to 
the International Board to levy 
such assessments when 50,000 
or more workers are on strike or 
are affected by a strike. 


called UAW officials offered the 
company a final four-point pro- 
posal. 

I That the Chrysler Corp. agree 
to the 1949 pattern of 10 cents 
an hour established in the auto 
industry at the Ford Motor Co. 
and recommended to the Presi- 
dent’s Steel Fact-Finding Board. 


2 That this 10 cents an hour be 
paid in one of the following 
ways: 

A. Six cents an hour for a pen- 
sion program and 4 cents for 
a hospital-medical program; 
or 

B. Some other combination upon 
which the corporation and 
the union could agree that 
would provide an adequate 
pension program and an ac- 
ceptable hospital-medical pro- 
gram for Chrysler workers 
and their families; or 

C. A flat IQ-cent an hour in- 
crease. 

^ That upon the corporati(m’s 
acceptance of this proposal, 
the strike would be called off and 
negotiations would continue on 
the technical details of the pen- 
sion and hospital-medical pro- 
gram for which the 10 cents an 
hour would be allocated. 

^ That if the corporation and 
the union were unable to 
agree within 30 days on the tech- 
nical details of the allocation of 
the 10 cents any unresolved ques- 
tions would be submitted to ar- 
bitration for a final decision 
which would be binding on the 
parties. 



CHESTER KWIATKOWSKI, striking UAW Chrysler worker, 
helps his two sons with a toy construction job on his living room 
floor. Kwiatkowski spends his time helping his wife around 
their Detroit home. UAW members reporting for picket duty 
on the second day of the strike were sent home by strike 
committeemen. Strike began Jan. 27, involves 24 plants. 


CWA Is All Set To Strike Bell Phone System 


T he CIO Communications Work- 
ers were scheduled to strike 
the giant Bell Telephone System 
on a. nation-wide front Wednes- 
day, Feb. 8, barring a last-minute 
agreement by the company to ar- 
bitrate the issues involved. 

CWA Pres. Joseph A. Beirne 
said the first strike call would 
affect about 100,000 workers in 
eight union divisions. He added 
that 220,000 other CWA members 
who would not be called upon to 
walk out until March 1 would 
likely refuse to go through the 
picket lines set up by the strikers. 

Declaring that the union had 
offered to arbitrate all its de- 
mands but that the Bell System 
companies had refused, Beirne 
said the walkout would take place 
"unless some change comes into 
the situation” before the hour set 
for the walkout. 

B eirne accused the Bell Tele- 
phone monopoly of "exploit- 
ing half a million workers by 
causing a decline in real wages 
for telephone workers, resulting 
in a falling standard of living for 
these workers and their families.” 

He called wage negotiations with 
the telephone industry "a sham.” 

"We’ve been bargaining with 
the telephone monopoly for sev- 
eral months; in one instance, as 
far back as last May,” Beirne said. 
“Absolutely no progress has been 
made. Despite the deplorable 
wages and working conditions in 
the industry, not one company 
has made a single proposal which 
would up wages one penny. On 
the contrary, they have made 
proposals which would decimate 
the contracts.” 

B eirne said the union has 
proposed arbitration with in- 
dividual companies or for all 
groups involved. "In every in- 
stance,” he declared, "we have re- 
ceived a flat ‘no’ from the com- 
pany.” 

He cited the case of Southwest^ 
ern Div. 20 when the governors 
of six states proposed arbitration 
as a solution. ^*The union promptly 
accepted the offer but the com- 
pany rejected it.** 

"What is to be done with a 
company which adopts such an 
arbitrary attitude,” Beirne asked, 


"trying to break or weaken the 
union, refusing to bargain across 
the table and refusing to let im- 
partial arbitrators decide the is- 
sues? What else can CWA do 
except strike the industry?” 

Beirne stated that the union 
was in a much better position to 
win a strike than it was in 1947 
when telephone workers failed to 
achieve their objectives in a six- 
week strike which upset commu- 
nications on a national scale. 

The telephone workers are ask- 
ing for an unspecified increase in 
the basic wage rates, a reduction 
of the work week from 40 to 35 
hours, shorter apprenticeship pe- 
riods, narrowing of geographical 
wage differentials, improved pen- 
sions, better vacations and a stip- 
ulation that workers be paid for 
time lost while they vote in elec- 
tions. 

The union has appealed to other 
CIO unions and the general public 
to help it "jam” the switchboards 
and the dial systems by making 
repeated calls in the event the 
strike is called. 


Ohio Goes CWA 

The CIO Communications 
Workers added another sizeable 
group of telephone workers to 
its ranks when the Ohio Fed- 
eration of Telephone Workers 
voted for CWA in an NLRB 
election. The final tally showed: 
CWA-CIO, 7535; IBEW-AFL, 
4064; no union, 1128. 



C WA has been assured the sup- 
port of the CIO by Pres. 
Philip Murray. In a nation-wide 
radio address last week Murmy 
said the Communications Work- 
ers "have deep grievances — griev- 
ances which they have sought for 
years to remedy. The time is fast 
approaching when these griev- 
ances of the people who staff your 
telephone system must be settled. 
If a strike must occur, it will be 
the last resort of a patient and 
responsible CIO union.” 

The CIO president said the pub- 
lic may hold the mistaken idea 


that the Bell System is an ^‘ideal 
place to work. It has that false 
impression because the Bell Sys- 
tem has spent millions of dollars 
to give just that idea.** 

But "behind that bright front 
window which the Bell company 
displays to the public” lie the 
facts that the great majority of 
Bell employes are "disgracefully 
underpaid”; that they have "little 
real security”; that thousands of 
them face technological unemploy- 
ment in the next few years; and 
that older employes can look for- 
ward only to "meager pensions 
in their old age.” 

"Telephone workers are under- 
paid and they are getting more 
underpaid every year,” Murray as- 
serted. "There is no economic 
basis for this cold-blooded wage 
policy adopted by the big teier- 
phone monopoly. But the tele- 
phone workers see no reason why 
they should be the sacrificial goat 
in the Bell System’s drive for ex- 
orbitant profits.” 

CWA bases its wage demands 
on the fact that wage levels in 


This Week 

the telephone industry — both in 
relation to prices and in relation 
to wages of other workers — have 
grown progressively worse for the 
past ten years. Phone workers 
today are almost at the bottom of 
the industrial wage scale, the 
union says. 

I N 1939 only petroleum refining, 
electric light and power, con- 
struction, coal mining, steel, autos 
and printing trades received high- 
er average weekly earnings than 
telephone workers. All these in- 
dustries have maintained general- 
ly their top position in weekly 
earnings while telephone wages 
have dropped far behind. 

In 1939, for example, auto work- 
ers earned 10c an hour more than 
telephone workers. Today they 
earn 37c an hour more. In 1939 
construction workers made 11c an 
hour more on the average than 
telephone workers. Today they 
earn 59c an hour more. Rubber 
workers in 1939 earned 7c an hour 
less than telephone workers. To- 
day they earn 17c an hour more. 

Workers in electrical manutac- 
turing in 1939 earned 10c an hour 
less than telephone workers. 
Today they earn 14c more. Steel- 
workers in 1939 earned 2c an hour 
more than telephone workers. 
Today they earn 30c an hour more. 

Commenting on the wage situ- 
ation in the telephone industry, 
Beirne said: 

"President Truman’s Steel Fact- 
Finding Committee found that 
telephone workers received the 
lowest wage increase treatment 
of all workers between 1939 and 
1949. The National Association of 
Manufacturers has even comment- 
ed on the decline in telephon® 
worker wage levels” 

Rate Rise Asked! 

The Chesapeake & Potomauj 
Telephone Co. of Virginia has 
been trying to get the State 
Corporation Commission to allow 
it to increase its rates. 

During a recent hearing, the 
telephone company’s attorney 
pointed out that the cost of every- 
thing else has gone up since the 
war and he said telephone rates 
can be expected to follow suit. 

(Should someone have asked him 
about telephone workers’ wages?) 

3 


History, $9 AT&T Dividend March On! 


1923— French and Belgian troops began occupa- 
tion of the Ruhr ... 76 burned to death in Cam- 
den, S. C., school fire. . . . Hitler wounded in 
Bavarian revolution. . . . Yankes beat Giants in 
World Series. . . . 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co. declared $9 
dividend. 

And AT&T did the same thing in 192It, 1925, 192^ 
and 1921. 

1928 — ^Trotsky and four others exiled from Russia. 
. . . Los Angeles dam collapsed, 450 lives lost. 
. . . First all-talking picture shown in New York 
City. . . . New smaller sized paper money first 
printed. . . . Raleigh Count won Kentucky Derby. 
. . . Arnold Rothstein shot to death in N. Y. . . . 
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. declared $9 
dividend. 

And AT&T did the same thing in 1928, 1929, 1930 
and 1931. 

1932 — 168, (KX) telephone workers were laid off by 
Bell Telephone. . . . Lindbergh baby kidnapped, 
later found dead. . . . Bruno Hauptmann arrested, 
tried, convicted, electrocuted for crime. . . . Swed- 
ish "Match King” Kreuger committed suicide in 
Paris. . . . Sino-Japanese war began, Japanese ma- 
rines land in China. . . . 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co. declared $9 
dividend. 


And AT&T did the same thing in 1933, 193 Jf, 1935^ 
and 1936. ■' 

1937 — Italy withdrew from League of Nations. 

. . . Gas explosion in Texas school killed 294. . . . 
Dirigible Hindenburg exploded and burned at 
Lakehurst. . . . Paris Exposition opened. . . . 
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. declared $9 
dividend. 

And AT&T did the same thing in 1938, 1939, 19ItO 
and 19Jfl. 

1942 — Coral Sea naval battle fought. . . . U. S. 
Air Force made first attack on Italy. . . . 491 
kiled in Cocoanut Grove night club fire in Boston. 

. . . WPA liquidated by Roosevelt. 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co. declared $9 
dividend. 

And AT&T did the same thing in 19Jtf3, 19U^ 19If5 
and 1946. 

1947 — ^3(30, 090 Bell Telephone workers walked off 
the job on strike. . . . Selective Service Act ex- 
pired. . . . Atomic Energy (Commission formed. 

. . . A1 Capone died. ... So did Mississippi’s Sen- 
ator Bilbo. ... 

American Telephone A Telegraph Co. declared $9 
dividend. 

And AT&T did the same thing in 1948, 1949 and 
1950 — and will keep on doing the same thing as 
long as possible. 


N 


THE CIO NEWS. FEBRUARY 6, 19i 




Hate Peddlers JIre Busy Hgain 

Exploit Race and Religious Prejudice, Fight Unions and Get Finances From Business and Suckers 


By ALLAN L. SWIM 

S OME OF the characters who go 
around beating their chests and 
shouting “down with the Communists” 
ai*e as bad as the Commies themselves. 

They— the extremists of the right— 
peddle a brand of totalitarianism no less 
vicious than the type which prevails in 
Russia. 

They do their darndest to undermine 
the theory that all U. S. citizens should 
enjoy equal rights and equal opportunities 
regardless of race, color or creed. 

Some of their “front” organizations are 
as crumby as anything in that line ever 
dreamed up by the Reds. 

The more rabid of these characters 
would send all Negroes to Africa, all Jews 
to Israel, all Catholics to Italy or all 
Orientals lo the Far East. 

And in one manner or another they’d 
get rid of or subjugate other racial and 
religious groups of which they disapprove. 

|T CAN BE argued successfully, of course, 
■ that the U. S. has no close-knit, over- 
all fascist organization. 


Because this is so, some persons con- 
tend that we can afford to ignore the 
fasci.st-minded groups and concentrate all 
our efforts on the Communists. 

This IS poor reasoning. 

We can’t afford to ignore any organiza- 
tion which seeks to undermine democracy, 
regardless of its size or power. 

It would be a mistake to assume that 
groups which are weak today will not 
become strong in the future. 

And it would be folly to go on the 
assumption that the poisonous seeds these 
outfits are sowing today Won’t produce 
some bitter fruit tomorrow. 

M ost persons are familiar with the 
Ku Klux Klan and recall that the 
Columbians “made” the headline not so 
long ago. 

But there are few who know that 
literally millions of “hate” leaflets and 
pamphlets are printed and distributed each 
year by organizations which seldom get 
into the news spotlight. 

One of the leading hate peddlers is 
Joseph Kamp, leader of the Constitutional 


Educational League. Another is Gerald 
L K. Smith, who is much better known 
than Kamp. 

In nearly every section of the country 
there are one or more “crackpot” outfits 
which exist solely to exploit race and 
religious prejudice. 

And almost without exception these 
groups seek to undermine the trade union 
movement. 

O VER A PERIOD of years 1 investigated 
and wrote newspaper stories about 
the hate mongers. 

Among the organizations into which i 
poked my nose were the Klan, Christian 
American, Fight for Free Enterprise, Com- 
mander Party, Independent Order of Min- 
ute Men and the Gerald Smith outfit. 

During the latter years of the war most 
of these organizations put on a patriotic 
front, and continued to he low imme- 
diately after the end of the conflict 

Then they began stirring again — and in 
recent months new outfits of the same 
type have been popping up here and 
there. 


Almost all of them sing the same theme 
song — “Americanism.” And to put their 
brand of “Americanism” into operation 
they would destroy some of our racial 
or religious groups and do away with the 
unions. 

T he hate peddlers, for the most part, 
are smooth operators who obtain their 
funds from two groups — corporations 
which fight unions and “suckers” who fall 
for their drivel about Americanism 

Among the leading “peddlers” are a 
couple of men who once faced sedition 
charges, a man who formerly worked as 
a race track tout and some crackpots who 
have lived comfortably for years by sell- 
ing the idea that the U. S. is likely to 
fall victim at any minute to the “great 
Jewish conspiracy” or the “great Catholic 
plot.” 

Unions should investigate and expose 
these groups whenever possible — not only 
for the benefit of their own^ members but 
for the public at large. 

And Congress could perform a valuable 
service if it would have a committee or 
two look into this situation. 


An Adamant ^No’ 

It’s getting monotonous! 

It wasn’t so long ago that the giants of the steel industry 
were saying “no, no, no, no” to the CIO Steelworkers. A strike 
followed. 

Then the biggest of all business operations — AT&T — took 
up the same refrain with the CIO Communications Workers. 

It said “no” to the union’s bargaining demands and then 
‘^no” to its request for arbitration. 

Finally CWA announced it intended to go on strike Feb. 8 
unless AT&T changed its position. 

At this point AT&T feigned shocked and horrified surprise 
that the union was fed up with its behavior and intended to hit 
the bricks. 

If AT&T had taken an honest look at its own books and at 
a few other statistics it would have known that it had pushed 
’phone workers to the limit of their patience. 

Back in 1939 ’phone workers were reasonably well paid. 
They aren’t any more. 

Eleven years ago auto workers earned 10c an hour more, 
on an average, than ’phone workers. Today they earn 37c 
an hour more. In 1939 rubber workers earned 7c less. Now 
they earn 17c more. Steel wages have increased 28c an hour 
more than ’phone workers’ have in 11 years. 

That’s only part of the story. Technical developments 
have been making heavy inroads on ’phone workers’ jobs. 

And the Bell System sought to withdraw recognition from 
the union because it voted to affiliate with the CIO. 

Nobody wants a telephone strike. But AT&T’s position 
has been such that workers in the industry considered a strike 
offered the only method of adjusting its grievances. 

And the CIO has pledged its full support to CWA. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


WeH/s 


Congress of Industrial Organizations 

Philip Murray, President James B. Carey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vice Presidents: Joseph A. Beirne, L. S. Buckmaster, Joseph Curran, 
John Green, Allan S. Haywood, O. A. Knight, Walter P. 
Reuther, Emil Rieve, Frank Rosenblum. 


Allan L Swim, Editor and Publicity Director 


Assistant Publicity Director: Henry C. Fleisher 
Assistant Editors: Holiace Ransdell, Fred Ross, Arthur Riordan, (On Leave)", 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark, William Weiss, Gervase N. Love 


Editorial Office, 718 Jackson Place, N. W., Washington 6 , D. Ci 


Entered as Second Class Matter. Post Office, Washington, 
Under the Act of Aug. 2A, 1912 and Feb 28 1925. 


D. a 


Amii-Uiiioxiism Equals ^Frustration' 


Vol. XIII 

4.. 


February 6, 1950 

pip 19^. 


No. 


By BOB SENSER 

For Labor Press Association 

T he anti-union guy with a 
chip on his shoulder is that 
way because he’s frustrated. Usu- 
ally he’s a boss coming up against 
a union for the first time. 

He’s bad enough, but a more 
dangerous type of anti-unionist 
is the “neutral” who has no con- 
nection with management, and is 
thus “impartial.” He’s frustrated, 
too, and has to do something 
about it, so he lets it out on the 
unions. 

Ihat’s-^what many psychologists 
believe, and one of them explained 
it all to 72 labor editors and union 
education directors who attended 
a public relations conference at 
Chicago sponsored by the Univ. 
of Illinois. He is Ross Stagner, 
professor of psychology in Labor 
and Industrial Relations at Illi- 
nois U. 

“The person who is aggressively 
opposed to unions is someone who 


Maybe AMA Journal 
Doesn’t Tell It AH 

Not more than 10% of U. S. 
doctors know what President 
Truman proposes in his national 
health program and less than 
that know what’s in the British 
program, Federal Security Ad- 
ministrator Oscar R. Ewing told 
the National Press Club in 
Washington. 

Ewing just returned from a 
six-weeks study of health and 
education in Europe. The na- 
tional health programs of Great 
Britain and Sweden, he ex- 
plained, “are part of a plan in 
both countries to nationalize 
everything that they can na- 
tionalize.” The only object in the 
President’s plan, he said, is to 
improve the national health. 

He also predicted that the 
U. S. will be forced soon to fol- 
low Great Britain’s example and 
provide aid to higher education 
before “some universities” be- 
come bankrupt. 


IS frustrated, someone who is 
angry and who builds up a lot of 
tension inside him,” said Stagner. 
“There’s the businessman who 
wants to boss his establishment 
and. wants to run everything his 
own way. 

“A union comes along and says 
he can’t do everything the way 
he wants to, that he has to follow 
certain rules on wages, hours and 
working conditions. For some 
employers this means an extreme 
case of frustration. 

“Another specimen of the frus- 
trated anti-unionist is the one 
who has no outward connection 
with management and thus is 
often regarded as ‘neutral and 
impartial.’ This type, too, has a 
certain amount of aggressiveness 
built up in him which he needs 
to let out. The fighting spirit 
may come from any of a number 
of reasons. Maybe his wife hen- 
pecks him and he can’t talk back 
to her. 

“Anyway, because of some ex- 
perience of his, he builds up 
steam, and is looking for some 
outlet for it. He hears somebody 


talking about ‘nasty, feather-bed- 
ding unionists,’ So he relaxes his 
frustrations by hating unices. In 
many cases this belligerent anti- 
unionism is caused by such inner 
tensions which the person him- 
self doesn’t understand.” 

For most anti - union people, 
Stagner pointed out, it is not a 
case of being aggressively, but 
rather one of being coolly 
“against.” He said that this lat- 
ter fault was caused by “stereo- 
typed” mental pictures of unions 
and union leaders. 

“I know,” he added, “because I 
come from Texas, and it was a 
long time before I stopped pictur- 
ing union organizers as persons 
with horns and tails.” 

Stagner urged that unions pay 
particular attention to schools, 
“because that’s where the first im- 
pressions, the first pictures are 
built up in the minds of people.** 

Stagner’s remarks came as a 
part of an all-day conference to 
discuss union public relations — 
or, in .Stagner’s terms, ways of 
building better “pictures” . of 
unions in the minds of the gen- 
eral public. 


]ft< 




Fj 




'3 


“So, remember, a vote for me helps you . . . and if anybody 
knows of an empty apartment, please let me know.” 





V 


Boss Made Mistake 
He Fired 
Sally Ann 

V ETERAN organizers know that it 
frequently takes months — and 

sometimes years — to establish unions 
in anti-union towns. 

When they get together to swap stories 
about their experiences they usually talk 
about the tough ones. 

“I practically became an old settler be- 
fore I wound that one up" is a phrase they 
frequently use. 

But occasionally somebody spins a yarn 
like the story of Sally Ann, the factory 
worker who got fired. 

S ALrLY ANN (which isn’t her real name) 
and her co-workers suddenly found 
they couldn’t meet a production schedule 
which provided them with 4()c ah hour. 

The material on which they were work- 
ing was extremely difficult to handle — and 
the girls soon became desperate under the 
prodding and criticism of. their foreladies. 

Sally Ann began circulating a petition- 
one of those ‘‘Please, Mr. Boss" things 
which humbly requested an increase in 
piece rates. 

A short time later Sally Ann was called 
into the office. “Go home and we’ll call you 
back when we need you," she was told. 

That was the company’s usual firing 
procedure and Sally Ann knew it. She went 
home. 

A SECOND PETITION, about which the 
company had no knowledge, made the 
rounds during the afternoon and by quit- 
ting time every employe of the department 
.. had signed it. 

The next morning it was sent to the 
ofidce — and early in the afternoon every 
worker in the department was fired! 

Soon Sally Ann's home was filled with 
excited workers. They talked for hours 
about what they should do. 

Somebody said there was an organization 
^ called the CIO which helped out workers 
who were in trouble. It was a union “or 
something,” the worker said. 

Sally Ann and a friend were asked to go 
^ to the “big city" some 60 miles away and 
learn what they could about the CIO. They 
went by bus the next day. 

■^EITHER SALLY ANN nor her friend 
had the slightest idea where to locate 
representatives, so they asked a policeman. 

He directed them to a tall building in 
the center of town and they headed in that 
direction. 

The building directory contained several 
hundred names— mostly of lawyers, real- 
tors, finance companies and manufacturers’ 
represen tati ves. 

The first union they found listed was the 
Furniture Workers. They decided that 
wasn’t the proper one. They reached the 
same decision regarding the Steelworkers. 

Then came Textile Workers Union of 
America. This, they figured, might be the 
right union, inasmuch as they were shirt- 
makers. 

They visited the TWUA office, told their 
story and were soon on the telephone talk- 
ing with the union’s regional director. 

#^N THE FOLLOWING evening several 
organizers arrived in Sally Ann’s town 
and within two days 90% of the workers 
in her department and another unit of the 
plant had signed union membership cards. 

At about the same time the company’s 
president flew in from a distant city, told 
local management it had made a bad error, 
asked all discharged employes to return to 
work and increased wages 5c an hour. 

If the mere threat of a union could do 
this, the workers told themselves, a union 
might work wonders. 

The company turned down a request for 
union recognition. The case went before 
the NLRB. The townspeople really turned 
on the anti-union pressure. 

But the union won a smashing victory 
when the votes were cast— largely because 
of Sally Ann. A.. L. S. 


A BAD CONNECTION! 



Reds Plot To Block Arms Aid, Through Bridges Group 


By ELMER COPE 

CIO European Representative 

IJAVING FAILED, in their efforts to 
■■ wreck the European Recovery Pro- 
gram, supporters and stooges of the Com- 
inform in some European trade unions 
have just launched an intensive campaign 
to sabotage implementation of the Atlan- 
tic Pact and the Military Aid Program. 

Basic objective of the campaign is to 
persuade European longshoremen not to 
uhload arms shipments made under MAP 
agreements. In some areas, the campaign 
is being accompanied by calling strikes 
in domestic industries. In French ports, 
the object is also to prevent loading and 
sailing of vessels carrying arms and troops 
to Indo-China. 

The great danger of the campaign lies 
in its threat to the whole free trade union 
movement and to the realization of the 
legitimate demands of the workers, parti- 
cularly in crucial countries like France 
and Italy. For, as governmental authori- 
ties and the public react to Communist 
threats, the inevitable effect will be to 
distract attention away from pressing so- 
cial and economic problems. 

Even worse, repressive measures aimed 
at Communist sabotage might very well 
catch in their net the free trade unions 
pursuing their legitimate activities in de- 
fense of the workers’ interests. 

As in the Communist-inspired strikes of 
1947 and 1948, designed to serve the ends 
of Soviet foreign policy, current Commu- 
nist political objectives are being cleverly 
linked to fully justified workers’ griev- 
ances and trade union demands. The gen- 
eral failure of governmental authorities 
in France and Italy to recognize the valid- 


Action Is Asked 
On D. C. Home Rule 

The CIO last week appealed for House 
action on a bill to give home rule to the 
District of Columbia. 

Nathan* Cowan, CIO legislative director, 
asked all members of the House to sign 
Discharge Petition 19 which would per- 
mit a Senate-passed bill to by-pass pigeon- 
holing in the House District Committee. 

The bill — S. 1527 — passed the Senate 
last year by a heavy majority, but has 
been kept under wraps in the House com- 
mittee ever since that time. 

“There is no valid reason why residents 
of the District should be relegated to the 
status of second class citizens," Cowan 
wrote. . . We believe the present sys- 
tem is fair neither to the nation nor to 
the District itself." 


ity of these demands has thus played into 
the hands of the Communists. 

^HE CURRENT campaign has apparently 
■ been extended to all key ports of 
Western Europe. So far, the greatest suc- 
cesses have been achieved in Italy. In 
France, the Communist impact appears to 
be strongest in the ports of Le Havre, Bor- 
deaux and St. Nazaire less in Marseilles 

where the Communist CGT, though in the 
majority, is confronted by an active, mili- 
tant Force Ouvriere local. 

In Cherbourg, longshoremen members of 
CGT have voted overwhelmingly in secret 
ballot to reject the party line, and the sec- 
retary of the CGT local has resigned in 
protest against CGT policy. Top figures 
of both the CGT and the Communist Party 


have been sent to all key ports to direct 
operations. 

With the President of the French Re- 
public, Vincent Auriol, intervening per- 
sonnally in the situation— an unusual step 
under French constitutional procedure — 
the French Cabinet has determined to take 
strong measures against what it describes 
as “sabotage" and “attacks on the national 
sovereignty." Communist reaction to 
threatened governmental action has been 
defiant. 

Although the actual call to action was 
only issued in November at the WFTU— 
i.e., Cominform— Asiatic Conference in Pei- 
ping, China, the first step in the present 
campaign was the formation last July of 
the WFTU-directed International Union of 
Seamen and Dockers. 

^HE INTL. Longshoremen’s and Ware- 
■ housemen’s Union was represented at 
the founding congress in Marseilles. Al- 
though ILWU Pres. Harry Bridges was re- 
fused permission to leave the U.S. to at- 
tend the congress, he was elected president 
of the organization. 

Real head of the present campaign, how- 
ever, is probably Bill Gebert, a Polish citi- 
zen who is the assistant general-secretary 
of the WFTU in charge of Trade Depart- 
ments. After the first World War, Gebert 
spent over 20 years in the U.S., where he 
was a member of the Central Committee 
of the U.S. Communist Party and for a 
time directed Communist work among 
Slavic-Americans in U.S. industrial areas. 

There is no doubt but that this intensi- 
fied Communist action in European ports, 
along with WFTU-Cominform activities in 
Asia, constitute the most serious immedi- 
ate problems confronting the newly formed 
International Confederation of Free Trade 
Unions. 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 4 , 19^* 


Steel Welfare 


M ajor welfare benefits — 
a direct product of last 
fall’s victorious steel strike — 
have been worked out for 
nearly 250,000 steel Workers. 

Other workers will win similar 
coverage and protection as de- 
tailed agreements are completed 
between the CIO Steelworkers 
and the rest of the steel industry. 

The benefits, to be financed by 
basic 2^^-cent an hour contribu- 
tions from both employers and 
workers, take the form of tre- 
mendous improvements for every 
steel working family. 

Philip Murray, USA-CIO presi- 
dent, hailed the agreements al- 
ready worked out at Bethlehem 
smaller companies, in these words: 

“The over-all protection for the . 
worker and his family in life in- 
surance, hospitalization and sick- 
ness benefits is a history-making 
advance in labor-management re- 
lations in American industry.” 


D etails of the five agree- 
ments already worked out 
were contained in the February 
issue of Steel Labor, the USA- 
CIO’s official paper. It described 
the computation of benefit plans 
as an “enormous mathematical 
task” which had consumed 
“countless hours of negotiations” 
by representatives of the union, 
the companies and their staffs of 
insurance experts. 

Here is a picture of what work- 
ers at Bethlehem and U. S. Steel 
will get (the benefits vary slightly 
between the two companies be- 
cause of adjustments for plans 
already in effect, special condi- 
tions, financial problems, etc.): 

1. LIFE INSURANCE. The 
worker is protected with life in- 
surance while he is on the job— 
and after he retires. Face value 
of the worker’s on-the-job policy 
will range from $2CK)0 to $4(X)0, de- 
pending on his wage rates, After 
he retires, he will have a policy 
worth $1250- 


Benefits Negotiated 


2. ACCIDENTS AND SICK- 
NESS. Each worker is guaran- 
teed $26 a week for 26 weeks in 
cases of accidents or sickness not 
covered by workmen’s compen- 
sation laws. 

3. HOSPITAL SERVICE. Hos- 
pital service will be provided up 
to 70 days for each period of hos- 
pital confinement. This coverage 
goes not only to the worker but 
to his wife and dependents, and 
unmarried children until they are 
19 years old. 

The hosiptal service gives to 
each person covered the benefits 
of bed, board and general nurs- 
ing service; use of operating and 
delivery rooms; anesthesia and 
dressings ; dr^igs, laboratory 
exams and special tests. 

4. MATERNITY SERVICE. 
Women steelworkers and wives of 
steel workers get 10 days of hos- 
pital care for themselves and 
their infants. 


5. EMERGENCY SERVICE 
Emergency , out-patient service is 
provided in case of accidental in- 
jury. The worker is protected if 
he requires emergency hospital 
treatment, and also if he requires 
medical care at home. 

(The hospitalization service at 
both U. S. Steel and Bethlehem 
are being handled through na- 
tional agreements with the Blue 
Cross agency.) 

S TEEL LABOR reported that 
“because of the extra bene- 
fits which accrue to those with 
dependents and because of the 
graduated life insurance policy, a 
scale of contributions has been 
worked out. These begin at a 
basic $2)90 a month for those 
with no dependents and a basic 
$4.15 a month for those with de- 
pendents. 

“The scale increases 30 cents 
a month to a maximum $4.40 for 
those with no dependents and 
there is a similar 30-cent increase 


in employe contributions up to 
$5.65 for those employes of Beth- 
lehem with dependents.” 

Complete arrangements have 
been worked out with Allegheny- 
Ludlum, Great Lakes Steel and 
Superior Steel, the union paper 
reported. 

Detailed agreements with the 
rest of the industry are expected 
to be speeded up because of the 
spade work completed with the 
two biggest companies, U. S. Steel 
and Bethlehem. Contributions to 
the insurance fund have been 
made since the first of the year. 

Murray Latimer, who heads the 
union’s special staff of insurance 
experts, estimates that $800,0(30 
has already been paid into the 
fund under this arrangement. . 

The Great Lakes and Superior 
plans went into effect Jan. 1 
Bethlehem’s took effect Feb. 1; 
Allegheny-Ludlum’s starts Feb. 15, 
and both the union and U. S. 
Steel are aiming for a March 1 
inauguration date at U. S. Steel. 


NLRB Orders GM Electrical Division Election 


T he CIO’s new International 
Union of Electrical, Radio 
and Mechanical Workers, CIO, 
last week scored on two major 
fronts. 

The fronts: 

I The Natl. Labor Relations 
* Board ordered an election 
among employes of General Mo- 
tors’ electrical division. 

2 U. S. District Judge Irving 
* Kaufman granted a tempo- 
rary restraining order which 
bars General Electric from hand- 
ing any checkoff money ovey to 
the United Electrical, Radio and 
Machine Workers, expelled from 
210 for Communist leadership. 
Argument for a permanent in- 


junction will be heard this week. 

In other fields, lUE-CIO was 
driving ahead. It was getting full 
cooperation from CIO in organiz- 
ing drives in the big GM, General 
Electric and Westinghouse chains 
and also in the independents. 

M ore than 27, (KX) employes 
of GM’s five electrical divi- 
sions will be given an opportunity 
this month to repudiate the 
Communist - controlled UE. The 
NLRB election petitions were 
filed by the lUE, while the UE, 
as the NLRB noted, “urged dis- 
missal of the CIO petitions.” 

UE’s argument that “the cur- 
rent contract of the employer 
barred further proceedings” was 
denied by the government agency 


which ruled unanimously that 
“the contract does not bar a pres- 
ent determination . of representa- 
tives.” 

Specific time of the five differ- 
ent elections will be fixed by 
John A. Penello, NLRB regional 
director in Baltimore. The divi- 
sions will be: Frigidaire Dayton, 
Ohio; Delco Appliance, Rochester, 
N. y.; Delco Products, Dayton, 
Ohio; Delco-Remy, New Bruns- 
wick, N. J.; Packard Electric, 
Warren, Ohio. 

The Board said it had studied 
‘T — the actions at the November, 
1949, convention of the CIO in 
Cleveland, in which the UE dele- 
gates walked out and the CIO 
voted to expel the UE; 2 — the 
special local membership meet- 


ings which voted to disaffiliate 
from the UE and to affiliate with 
lUE; and 3— the chartering of 
locals by the lUE.” 

The NLRB announced that in 
each of the company’s five divi- 
sions the lUE locals will have 
their designated local numbers on 
the ballot. 

“The UE had contended,” the 
Board remarked, “that the use 
of the local numbers violated the 
UE’s property rights.’ On this 
point the Board opinion stated: 
“We do not purport to pass upon 
the property rights of the parties 
in any respect. We find merely 
that the lUE-CIO’s name in con- 
junction with the names of its 
locals will not confuse the voters 
in the elections.” 


The overwhelming preference 
for lUE was officially noted in the 
Board’s decision when it related: 

“The vote at Deled Appliance 
Division and Delco-Remy Division 
was unanimous. At Delco Prod- 
ucts Division the vote was 999 to 
1 against the UE and in favor of 
the lUE-CIO. The meeting at 
Packard Electric Division was 
held in two sections. In one sec- 
tion, where the attendance was 
between 800 and 1000, the vote 
was unanimous. In the second 
section the vote was 58 to 3 
against the UE and in favor of 
the lUE-CIO. At the Frigidaire 
Division, of approximately 2000 
members present, three or four 
voted in favor of UE and the re- 
mainder in favor of the lUE-CIO.” 


In Cornwall, 0iit. 


Commie Attempt To Raid TWUA Is Talk Of Town 


By GERVASE N. LOVE 

C ORNWALL, Ont., is an en- 
terprising and attractive 
city of more than 15,000 popu- 
lation on the north bank of the 
mighty St. Lawrence River. It 
lies 70 miles southwest of Mon- 
treal and just across an inter- 
national bridge from the 
United States. 

Through it runs the Cornwall 
Canal, also known as the Soul- 
anges Canal nearer Montreal. 
Surplus water from it has proved 
a bonanza for industrial develop- 
ment, and the city has become 
a large-scale textile producer. 

The largest plants are Cburt- 
aulds, on the bank of the canal 
at the eastern edge of the city, 
and Canadian Cottons. In them 
are employed some 4000 workers 
whose militancy is a byword in 
the Canadian labor movement. 
Back in 1946 they took a vote 
among themselves and over- 
whelmingly rejected the AFL 
United Textile Workers in favor 
of the CIO Textile Workers Union 
of America. 

T he workers have been paid 
off for that vote in cold cash, 
Improved working conditions and 
other benefits, but the UTW and 
the Communists who dominate it 
north of the border have kept on 
trying. They haven’t got very 
far, but 4000 militant union mem- 
bers in one small city would add 


considerably to the waning pres- 
tige of the Canadian Communists. 

So they have kept at it, crawl- 
ing farther and farther out on a 
limb until it broke, and they 
landed right where the Cornwall 
Textile Joint Board and the three 
locals could (and did) take a 
smashing wallop at them. 

The limb cracked when R Kent 
Rowley, UTW international vice 
president and Canadian director, 
who was interned early in the 
war by the Canadian Government 
and kept out of circulation until 
Soviet Russia joined the conflict, 
issued a challenge. 

“Textile .workers everywhere,” 
he bleated, “should study the rec- 
ord carefully.” 

The Joint Board and the three 
locals did just that. 

The result was an open letter 
that showed the TWUA record 
in Cornwall to be one of supreme 
accomplishment for its members 
when stacked up against the sorry 
local history the UTW and the 
Commies who dominate it have 
written in the last three years. 

For instance: 

Since 1946 Courtauld employes, 
represented by TWUA, have re- 
ceived wage increases averaging 
50^/^ c an hour. 

Since 1946 Canadian Cottons 
employes, represented by TWUA, 
have received 36 V 2 cents in di- 
rect wage increases and another 
10c where there has been reor- 
ganization. 

Since 1946 employes of Domin- 
ion Textiles, kingpin of the Cana- 


Conroy Approves 

“The TWUA-CIO has done 
one of the best trade union jobs 
in Canada and has done a most 
effective job for the textile 
workers of Cornwall,” said Secy.- 
Treas. Pat Conroy of the Can- 
adian Congress of Labour in a 
note accompanying the open let- 
ter of the Cornwall, Ont., Joint 
Board and three locals of the 
CIO Textile Workers. 

“The Communists’ attempts to 
raid the established and effective 
locals of Cornwall is of major 
importance to all Canadian 
workers,” Conroy continued. 


dian cotton industry, represented 
by UTM, have received but 20c 
an hour. 

T hat isn’t all. Here is what 
the open letter has to say: 
“Since 1946 the workers of 
Courtaulds have received in- 
creases averaging 5 OV 2 C per hour; 
reduction of the work week by 
six hours; liberal life, sick end 
accident, hospital, medical and 
surgical insurance paid entirely 
by the company, together with 
greatly improved vacation pay. 

“In Canadian Cottons the work- 
ers have received 36^^c per hour 
in direct wage increases plus an- 
other 10c an hour where reor- 
ganization has been applied; plus 
two weeks’ vacation with pay for 
all with one or more years’ serv- 


ice, with two weeks’ vacation with 
pay based on 4% of earnings for 
those, with less than one year; 
life, sick and accident, hospital 
and surgical insurance for all em- 
ployes and hospital insurance for 
dependents of employes paid by 
the company, and a pension plan 
without equal in Canada, paying 
up to $100 per month.” 

The letter was signed by Archie 
LeBrun, Joint Board president; 
Thomas Duffy, president of Local 
779; Andre Derouin, president of 
Local 805, and Thomas Webster, 
president of Local 806. 

Rowley took it very hard that 
there was no strike to enforce 
demands at Canadian Cottons last 
year. The four TWUA leaders 
rather unkindly pointed out to 
him that “after a lot of fanfare, 
strike votes and bombastic news- 
paper statements, you set the 
wage pattern in cotton for all of 
Canada when you capitulated to 
Dominion Textiles, the largest 
cotton producers in Canada, and 
signed an agreement providing 
for no wage increases and no 
bonus, no 45-hour week, no union 
or closed shop^ — this despite the 
fact that Dominion Textiles 
earned in 1948 the highest figure 
in their history ($5,382,475), which 
was 90% greater than their profits 
of 1947, and despite the fact that 
negotiations were concluded be- 
fore devaluation (of the Canadian 
dollar in relation to- the U. S. 
dollar), and before negotiations 
were started in Canadian Cottons. 


“The demogoguery of yourself 
and your associates is )3est dis- 
played by the demands on Do- 
minion Textiles of 13c an hour 
(reduction of hours with no re- 
duction of take-home pay) 45-hour 
work week, the closed shop, etc., 
etc., etc., and then all you could 
report as a result of negotiations 
was a minimum insurance plan 
the like of which was negotiated 
with Canadian Cottons several 
years ago and since substantially 
improved, and an improved vaca- 
tion plan that affects only a hand- 
ful of the workers involved!” 

The letter went on in the same 
vein for six legal-size pages, all 
comparing what the TWUA and 
the UTW have done for the Cana- 
dian textile worker. The record 
shows conclusively that in addi- 
tion to all other contract improve- 
ments, workers under TWUA 
agreements enjoys a far higher, 
degree of job security than those 
under UTW agreements. 

The Commies’ attempt to take 
over TWUA members under UTW 
has caused more excitement 
among Cornwall textile workers 
than anything since the town be- 
came a city in 1944 (it was 
founded as New Johnstown in 
1784 by United Empire Loyalists 
who fled from the then brand new 
.United States.) The workers in 
Howard Smith’s pulp mill, along 
the canal an the opposite side of 
the- city from Courtaulds, in the 
nearby sawmills, on the railroads 
and along the riverfront are 
watching it with interest. 



6 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 6, 1950 

•t:j n : I ' i't i ^ ■ ii 


Labor To Dixie Demos: ^We^re For Fair Deal’ 


A merican unions are sol- 
idly behind the Fair Deal, 
three leaders of labor’s political 
arms told 200 Democrats from 
14 southern states who met at 
Raleigh, N. C., Jan. 27 to re- 
new their party faith at a re- 
gional conference. 

'‘We are for the Fair Deal pro- 
gram and for the spirit of pro- 
gressive and liberal government 
that it expresses,” said CIO-PAC 
Dir. Jack Kroll. 

Kroll was joined in his indorse- 
ment of the Truman program oy 
Joseph Keenan, director of AFL 
Labor’s League for Political Edu- 
cation, and C. T. Anderson, sec- 
retary of Railway Labor Political 
League. 

K ROLLi put particular emphasis 
on the necessity of enactment 
of the Brannan farm plan. 

“The South’s rapid economic 
progress should be a matter of 
pride to the entire nation,” he 
said. “We feel this progress has 
been largely brought about by 
the minimum wage law and by 
the organization of Southern 
workers. The adoption of these 
factors have given Southern 
workers increased purchasing 
power, made them better custom- 
ers and better producers,” 

♦ 

He said the CIO is much con- 
cerned with the decline in farm 


CIO, AFL Support HST’s Program 








JACK KROLL 


JOSEPH KEENAN 


Both Krollj who is CIO-PAC Director j and Keenan, who heads the 
AFUs League for Political Education, told the Democrats’ Southern 
Regional Conference that President Truman’s program has organized 
labors’ unqualified support, spoke out against sectionalism. 


prices during the past year. “We 
are actively aware that in the 
past, depressions have started on 
the farms of the nation,” he de- 
clared. “For this reason, the CIO, 
at its last convention wholly en- 


dorsed the conception 
Brannan plan.” 


of the 


A pledge of 100% support 
for the Truman program also 
came from Keenan. Warning 


against sectionalism, he said “We 
must live as a nation. That's la- 
bor’s principle. That’s what we’ve 
fought for.” 

Said C. T. Anderson, secretary 
of the Railway Labor Political 
League: “You may not like every- 
thing the Democratic party stands 
for, but you at least know what it 
stands for and what the price is. 
The Republican party since 1932 
hasn’t yet told the people what 
it stands for. In my experience, 
they’ve been for nothing since the 
Panama Canal. The people know 
what you stand for and what you 
are proposing.” 

No hint of civil rights discord 
arose during the all-day confer- 
ence, whi'ch was closely shep- 
herded by North Carolina’s Demo- 
cratic National Committeeman, 
Jonathan Daniels, who had charge 
of arrangements. 

V ICE PRES. Alben Barkley was 
the featured speaker at the 
North Carolina Jefferson- Jackson 
Day Dinner, which came at the 
close of the regional conference. 
The dinner, most successful in 
the State’s history, raised more 
than $32,000 for the party’s war 
chest, Barkley said. 

“I express the hope that the 
organization of Democratic forces 
in the nation will not fall apart 
merely because a victory has been 
won in a single election. The bat- 
tle for democracy is like the bat- 


tle for liberty in that it requires 
eternal vigilance. 

“The Democratic party, through 
its long and glorious history, has 
achieved enough for the welfare 
of the American people to justify 
continuous and coordinated labor 
on behalf of all Democrats, in and 
out of office, to keep the light for- 
ever burning which points the 
way to progress and to solid 
achievement in behalf of America 
and everything for which she 
stands.” 

Barkley pictured the Republican 
party as “on its death bed.” “It 
looks to me,” he said, “like the 
Republican party may be on the 
way out frorn now on.” 

O THER SPEAKERS at the con- 
ference included Treasury 
Secy. John Snyder, Agriculture 
Secy. Charles F. Brannan, Na- 
tional Democratic Chairman Wil- 
liam Boyle, Army Secy. Gordon 
Gray, Undersecretary of State 
James Webb, Budget Director 
Frank Pace, and Leon Keyserling, 
acting chairman of President Tru- 
man’s Council of Economic Ad- 
visors, Mrs. Charles W. Ti^lett, 
vice chairman of the Democratic 
National Committee, and Mrs. 
Dorothy Vredenburgh, secretary 
of the Democratic National Com- 
mittee. 

Govs. Kerr ^ott of North Caro- 
lina, Sidney McMath of Arkansas 
and James E. Folsom of Alabama 
took turns presiding. 


Dixieerat Leader McCorvey: 


‘We’ll Let Others Share Glory Of Electing President’ 


By Robert Christoff erson 

■■■F WE THINK we can elect 
■ a better government than the 
people can, we can do it and 
they can’t do anything about it.” 

The statement was said humor- 
ously, but many viewed it seri- 
ously, for it came 
from the man 
who engineered 
the political ma- 
neuver that took 
Alabama’s 11 elec- 
toral votes away 
from Harry S. 

Truman in 1948 
and gave them to 
Dixieerat candi- 
dates Thurmond 
and Wright. 


MoCorvey 


The speaker was portly Demo- 
cratic Party Chairman Gessner T. 
McCorvey of Mobile. The occasion 
was the Jan. 21 meeting of the 


State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee at Montgomery, called to 
set qualifications for the Demo- 
cratic primary on May 2. McCor- 
vey’s blunt remark referred to 
the power the committee has in 
controlling Democratic Party af- 
fairs in Alabama. 

But that was not the only eye- 
opener in the hour-long, 21-page 
speech delivered by the party 
chairman. 

In the 1948 Presidential elec- 
tion McCorvey stood forth as a 
shining knight in the armor of 
states’ rights to defend the South 
against President Truman’s civil 
rights program (“civil strife,” in 
Mr. McCorvey’s book). 

In his speech before the party 
executive committee, he revealed 
himself for what he is: A Dixie- 
gop ' of the first order, fighting 
not only civil rights but the en- 
tire Fair Deal program. 


Dixieerat Loyalty Oath 
Proposal Proves Dud 

The issue of party loyalty did not come to an open showdown at 
the Alabama Democratic Executive Committee meeting. A pre-dawn 
caucus of the Dixieerat members reportedly resulted in rejection of 
a proposal to bar candidates who did not support nominees of the 
Democratic Party of Alabama.’ ” 

This would have meant those who were opposed to giving Ala- 
bama’s electoral votes to Thurmond and Wright, since the Democratic 
electors were nominees of the 1948 Democratic primary. 

The meeting was called to set qualifications for the Democratic 
primary on May 2. 

Gessner T. McCorvey, Executive Committee Chairman, urged the 
committee to “declare that the official name of our party is 'the 
Democratic Party of Alabama.’ ” 

He also recommended that the party emblem on the ballot be 
revised to identify .it with the so-called states’ rights movement. 

The chairman’s proposals went absolutely without response. In- 
stead^ the committee adopted a party loyalty resolution that simply 
required that candidates, must have supported the nominees of the 
“Democratic Party.” The loyalty oath authorized is the same that has 
been in effect for more than 25 years. 

One important change is evident, however, in party rules. Previous 
rules had opened the primary only to “white” Democrats. The adjective 
“white” is omitted in this year’s rules. 


To many the revelation was 
nothing new. Liberals and labor 
have been saying for a long time 
that the Democratic Party chair- 
man was a Democrat in name, a 
Dixieerat in practice and a Re- 
publican in belief — the recipe for 
a Dixiegop. 

l^cCORVEY ATTACKED “exces- 
sive taxation,” deficit spend- 
ing, “socialistic government,” the 
swelling “federal payroll,” “wel- 
fare state” (the state of disinte- 
gration in McCorvey’s book), the 
“federal (government’s) tide- 
lands (oil) grab.” 

An impassioned defense of state 
control of tidelands and oil de- 
posits thereunder took up more 
than a page of the speech. “This 
money (from oil leases) rightfully 
belongs to the states, but the fed- 
eral government is trying to grab 
it,” he cried. McCorvey, a corpo- 
ration lawyer who represents two 
of the largest oil companies, 
Standard and Gulf, denied that 
the fight over the tidelands “is 
a fight between the federal gov- 
ernment and the big oil compa- 
nies.” The fight, he declared, “is 
a fight between the federal gov- 
ernment and the several states.” 

McCorvey gave his listeners a 
’history of the Democratic Party, 
the reasons why the “Solid South” 
remained “solid” for so long, 
some jokes and poetry, the his- 
tory of the States Rights move- 
ment and a “vindication” of the 
1948 campaign of the Dixiecrats 
(a name he objects to because it 
is “too much localized”). 

McCorvey suggests the possibil- 
ity that in 1952 the Dixiecrats 
might “share” wth the Repub- 
licans “in the glory of electing a 
President.” 

"In 1952 the southern states 
should nominate their Presiden- 
tial electors prior to the national 
conventions of the major parties,” 
McCorvey suggested. 

“Let these Presidential electors 
get together and pick out some 


LABOR WAS WELL REPRESENTED when the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee met to set qualifications for the 
Alabama Democratic primary on May 2. Pictured clockwise 
around the table in a Montgomery hotel room are Robert A. 
Kilpatrick, Brotherhood of Railway Qerks; Eugene M. Wells 
of the CIO; Hugh Brown of the AFL and William Mitch of the 
Mine Workers. Ben Blankenship of the Communications Workers 
is shown standing. J. P. Knight of the Railway Brotherhood also 
attended the meeting, but does not appear in this picture. 


outstanding American who stands 
for states ..rights, such as we did 
m 1948, announce that we will 
support him for President, and 
then, if one of the major political 
party comes along later and nom- 
inates the same man we have 
nominated that will be perfectly 
all right, and we will let them 
share with us in the glory of 
electing a President.” 

M CCORVEY suggested that the 
“States Rights” Democrats 
of the South could easily start 
the ball rolling by electing as 
their choice a man of the type of 
General Eisenhower. . . . “Every 
utterance that I have seen from 
General Eisenhower . . . has in- 
dicated that he believes in the 
principle of States Rights. . . 

(Ed. note: Of late. General Eisen- 
hower has been talking more and 
more like an Old Guard Republican.) 

In one astoundingly frank para- 
graph in his speech, McCorvey let 
it be known what he thought of 
most Americans: 


“We of the South are in fact 
the back-bone of the country . . . 
the people of our section are 
really the true Americans. We 
have in the South the purest 
Anglo-Saxon blood in the West- 
ern Hemisphere. In Alabama and 
other Southeastern states the per- 
centage of foreign-born popula- 
tion and native-born population 
with foreign-born parents is less 
than 2%, while in the state of 
New York, taken as a whole, the 
percentage of foreign-born popu- 
lation and native-born population 
with foreign-born parents (like 
Mayor LaGuardia, for example) is 
43%, while in the city .^f New 
York the percentage of foreign- 
born population and native-born 
population with foreign-born par- 
ents is the astounding figure of 
69%, 

“Just think of people from that 
section of the country comparing 
themselves to Alabamans when it 
comes to considering who are the 
real Americans.” 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 6, 1950 



Rubber Union Wins 
Pensions At Goodyear 


T he GOODYEAR Tire & 
Rubber Co. has agreed to 
the pension demands of the 
CIO Rubber Workers for its 
24,000 workers, employed in 10 
plants throughout the country. 

The company will pay pensions 
of at least $100 a month to work- 
ers who have reached the age of 
65 and who have 25 years’ serv- 
ice. 

The new plan differs from ex- 
isting programs in that if 1% of 
a retiring employe’s total earn- 
ings exceeds $1200, the 1% will be 
paid him annually for life. 

Thus, if an employe has worked 
25 years and his total earnings 
amount to $125,000, 1% of this 
figure would be $1250, which 
would be the amount of pension 
received. 

As in the basic steel formula, 
the company will pay the entire 
cost of the pension except for the 
amount paid by social security 
payments. However, if social se- 
curity benefits are increased as 
expected, the company will add 
half of that increase and tack it 
on to the workers’ monthly pen- 
sion. 

This means that if the fed- 
eral benefits should be increased 


$20, $10 would be added to what- 
ever the retiring employe would 
have received before the social se- 
curity increase. 

The new pact also includes a 
new arrangement whereby the 
company will pay the entire cost 
of the present group insurance 
plan, which up until the present 
has been partly financed by em- 
ployes. 

W ORKERS WITH less than 25 
years’ service at age 65 who 
have more than 15 years’ serv- 
ice will receive proportionately 
smaller pensions. Employes per- 
manently and totally disabled 
after 15 years’ work will receive a 
minimum pension of $50 a month. 

Goodyear is the second of the 
“Big Four” in the rubber indus- 
try to agree to a pension plan. 

The plan is subject to approval 
by the URW Executive Board and 
Goodyear stockholders, to become 
effective April 1, 1950. 

Goodyear has 14,000 employes at 
Akron, Ohio. Other plants are 
located at Los Angeles, Calif.; 
Gadsden, Ala.; New Bedford, 
Mass.; Muncie, Ind.; Jackson, 
Mich.; St. Mary’s, Ohio; Topeka, 
Kan.; Windsor, Vt., and Lincoln, 
Neb. 


^There Is No Such Thing As 
Good Monopoly, ’--Bergson 


A TTY. GEN. McGrath and Asst. 

Atty. Gen. Bergson told the 
New York State Bar Association 
that bigness in business is a 
threat to the anti-trust laws be- 
cause big business can impose 
illegal restraints on competition 
“more easily than could a small 
one.” 

Spelling out what they are at- 
tempting to do, the two top pros- 
ecutors of monopoly emphasized 
they are not attacking bigness as 
such, but bigness as a vehicle for 
monoply. Their speeches, largely 
ignored or distorted by the daily 
press, offer the clearest picture 
of the government’s campaign 
against monopoly yet provided. 

The monopoly problem is “next 
to unemployment the most press- 
ing domestic economic problem of 
our time,” McGrath said. 

“%«E RECOGNIZE, of course,” 
he said, “that bigness as 
such is not a crime. We also 
must recognize, as has the Su- 
preme Court, that ‘size carries 
with it an opportunity for abuse’ 
and that therefore we must be 
constantly on the alert for these 
abuses.” 

Tracing the history of the en- 
forcement of the anti-trust laws, 
McGrath told how the Supreme 
Court in 1920 crippled enforce- 
ment by ruling in the U. S. Steel 
Corp. case that steel’s “power to 
monopolize the steel industry did 
not constitute a violation of the 
Sherman Act, in the absence of a 
showing that the corporation was 
exercizing that power.” 

Then, in one of the most potent 
sentences that has come from an 
Attorney General in years, Mc- 
Grath added: “To my way of 
thinking, that is but another way 
of saying that the Sherman Act 
only outlaws bad monopolies. The 
plain language of the Act is to 
the contrary.” 

Bergson, who is directly in 
charge of anti-trust enforcement, 
declared, “Our experience has 
shown that there is no such thing 
as a good monopoly. Whenever 
we have found a monopoly we 


have also found that it was used 
selfishly for private benefit rath- 
er than for public good.” 

“Size in itself is not an anti- 
trust crime,” Bergson said. “Nei- 
ther is the possession of a hunt- 
ing rifle a crime. But just as a 
rifle may be used to perpetrate a 
crime, so may size be an instru- 
ment for violating the anti-trust 
laws. In either situation that 
which was otherwise lawful be- 
comes tainted with the illegal ef- 
fects it caused and becomes an 
appropriate object for judicial ac- 
tion.” 

“I BELIEVE that most of us 
■ would agree that while many 
anti-trust violations may be com- 
mitted regardless of size, bigness 
may facilitate the attainment of 
illegal ends. A big company 
which would do so, may impose 
illegal conditions on an industry 
more readily than could a small 
one. 

“In such a situation, size is not 
the offense. The offense is the 
monopoly power or the restraint 
of trade, the achievement of 
which was aided by the defend- 
ant’s size. To neutralize the 
means by which the offense was 
perpetrated, to us seems not only 
to be logical but also to be re- 
quired by long-established prin- 
ciples of the anti-trust laws.” 

Bergson gave examples of how 
the anti-trust division’s cases 
against big companies have bro- 
ken up monopolistic practices. 
“Some proponents of the ‘good 
monopoly’ theory take the posi- 
tion,” he said, “that efficiency is 
of paramount importance and 
that if the enforcement of the 
anti-trust laws might interfere 
with efficiency, violations of those 
laws should be condoned. 

“The Germans made this mis- 
take.' Through their system of 
cartelization and their much- 
vaunted efficiency they were able 
to ride for a time the crest of 
economic power. Their worship 
of these concepts, however, 
warped their entire philosophy 
and eventually led their country 
to chaos and destruction.” 


Bethlehem 
Ship To Pay 
Pensions 

The “Bethlehem pension for- 
mula” of $100-minimum perf- 
sions has been put into op- 
eration for the company’s 12,- 
000 shipyard employes. 

Eight months of negotiations 
between Bethlehem Shipyard of- 
ficials and the CIO Marine & 
Shipbuilding Workers union were 
climaxed by a 5 a.m. agreement 
on the pension issue. 

The new pact doubles the ship- 
yard’s present $50-a-month pen- 
sions, paid for entirely by the 
corporation. To qualify for that 
amount, *'w o r k e r s must have 
reached the age of 65 afer 25 
years’ service with the corpora- 
tion. 

In addition, the new pact brings 
improvements in the present life 
insurance plan and the inclusion 
of hospitalization benefits. Work- 
ers and the company will each 
pay 2 V 2 cents an hour for the 
welfare coverage. 

Previously the workers had 
paid 3 cents for the insurance 
alone. 

The new agreement was ar- 
ranged to coincide with the simi- 
lar pact held by the CIO Steel- 
workers with the rest of the Beth- 
lehem Steel set-up. The old agree- 
ment would have expired June 23, 
but the new one ends on Dec. 31, 
1951 — the same date as the steel 
union’s current pact. 

Like the steelworkers’ agree- 
ment, it provides a wage reopen- 
ing period at the end of 1950. 

Union Spikes 
Wilson Plan 

C IO PACKINGHOUSE Workers 
recently turned an attempted 
sales promotion scheme by Wil- 
son & Co. into another boost for 
UPWA’s “Don’t Buy Wilson” cam- 
paign. 

The company had planned a 
special sales stunt to push its 
products at a large super-market 
on the outskirts of Denver, Colo. 
The Union has sought unsuccess- 
fully for many months to obtain 
a contract with Wilson & Co. 

While the inside of the market 
displayed elaborate banners and 
special mark-down prices for Wil- 
son meats, outside UPWA repre- 
sentatives and members quietly 
passed out handbills which told 
approaching customers of the 
company’s attempts to smash the 
union. 

Prospective buyers stayed away 
from the Wilson display in large 
groups and some protested to the 
management for even carrying 
the goods, UPWA officials said. 

At the end of the day, the 
shelves remained stocked with 
Wilson meats and the attempted 
promotion had ended as a dismal 
flop for the company and a s-pec- 
tacular gain for UPWA. 

Oil WorkersTo Set 
Goals For 1950 

The National Policy Committee 
of the CIO Oil Workers Union 
will meet at the union’s head- 
quarters in Denver- on Feb. 27 to 
e s t a b 1 i s h collective bargaining 
goals for the coming year, it was 
announced by OWIU Pres. O. A. 
Knight. 

He said the committee would 
consider pensions, a shorter work 
week, wages and all other phases 
of contractual relations in the 
industry. 


Laundry Workers Win 
Sweeping Pact Gains 


QOME 25,000 New York 
^ laundry workers have won 
pensions, a form of guaranteed 
annual wages, and the benefits 
of wage-hour minimum rates. 

The improvements were con- 
tained in a contract sign by the 
Laundry Workers Joint Board of 
the CIO Amalgamated Clothing 
Workers with four major em- 
ployer associations in the New 
York metropolitan area. 

ACW Secy.-Treas. Frank Rosen- 
blum, who announced the new 
two-year agreements, said they 
provide for wage reopening at any 
time upon 60 days’ notice. 

N oting that less than a 
dozen years ago the New 
York laundry industry was widely 
regarded as a sweatshop, Rosen- 
blum hailed the employers’ con- 
cessions and “the steady improve- 
ment in wage and working condi- 
tion, job security, the social wel- 


fare benefits, and now the intro- 
duction of pension benefits.” 

Under the new pact,* employers 
will pay 1% of their weekly pay- 
rolls into the pension fund, and 
a study will be made to determine 
how the pension funds can be 
increased. 

yhe 75c minimum wage was 
also written into the pact, though 
the new wage-hour law exempts 
the laundry industry from paying 
the rate automatically. Weekly 
minimum rates in two divisions 
of the industry were lifted $1.25 
and $2.20, while male employes 
are guaranteed 40 hours of work 
a week. 

Rosenblum said this provision 
is “tantamount” to a guaranteed 
annual wage. 

All workers will receive seven 
holidays with pay, a week’s paid 
vacation, and two week’s paid 
vacation after four years on the 
job. A series of health provisions 
provide sickness, accident, mater- 
nity, hospital and surgery benfits. 


Oklahoma Council Convention 
Votes Strike Support to CWA 


^HE OKLAHOMA CIO Indus- 
trial Union Council passed a 
number of important resolutions 
at its recent convention in Okla- 
homa City. 

Twenty CIO Communications 
Workers delegates were given a 
standing vote of support in their 
coming struggle with the AT&T. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Robert McVay 
addressed his opening remarks 
to these new members of the 
Council and told them he was 
proud to welcome them into the 
CIO. 

The main speaker, Ass’t. Sec. 
of Labor John Gibson, told the 
delegates that “after more than 
two years of operations the rec- 
ord is clear. The emergency pro- 
visions of the Taft-Hartley law 
are a complete failure. It makes 
no contribution toward the ad- 
justment of national emergency 
disputes.” 

Resolutions adopted dealt with 


political action, community serv- 
ices, opposition to legislation pro- 
hibiting sale of intoxicating bev- 
erages, promotion of union labels, 
improving farmer - labor unity, 
support of CIO policy, support of 
American Veterans Committee, 
investigation of the State Indus- 
trial Commission, support of 
CWA-CIO demands and condem- 
nation of AT&T. 

Anthony W. Smith, assistant to 
lUC Dir. John Brophy, pointed 
out the responsibilities of the 
state council to carry out the pro- 
gram of National CIO and said: 
“The responsibility for what goes 
on in the state of Oklahoma is 
yours and yours alone. It will 
be effective exactly to the extent 
that you give your officers and 
representatives in this state and 
the CIO Regional Office support 
in the things they are doing here.” 

Newly elected officers are: Al- 
bert W. Mitchell, Oil Workers, 
president; Paul Copeland, CWA, 
vice president, and John W. Jac-i 
obsen, Brewery Workers, secre- 
tary-treasurer. 


iumes 















“Got something that will enchant my boss into giving me a 
$10 raise 


8 




N, 



I 

k 





Poverty and Poorhouse, or Pensions for Workers 


By D. ROCKWELL CLARK 

T he men in the picture 
below are ‘^retired” mem- 
bers of the CIO Steelworkers, 
‘'preserving their dignity and 
independence” in the Lake 
County, Ind., poorhouse. 

Presumably, 1% of their pay- 
checks was deducted for Social 
Security from Jan. 1, 1937, when 
the law went into effect, until the 
day they “retireA*^ 

But they’re still in the poor- 
house. 

That's what’s wrong with the 
present Social Security law. 

It is supposed to provide a de- 
cent-sized government-paid pen- 
sion for every worker who stays 
on a ‘"covered” job long enough 
to get “fully insured.” It is sup- 
posed to take care of his widow, 
if he dies, and of his dependent 
children whether he dies or re- 
tires. 

The law operates as it was in- 
tended to; it is honestly admin- 
istered. But no worker can retire 
on kis Social Security income 
today and have enough money to 
live. No widow can support herself 
or her family on it. 

T his is part of the reason for 
CIO’s big drive to negotiate 
pensions in industry. And CIO’s 
drive, in turn, spurred Congress 
to action, to bring the Social 
Security law up to date. The re- 
sult was that HR 6000 passed the 
House late last Spring and is now 
under consideration by the Con- 
servative Senate Finance Com- 
mittee. 

HR 6000 made many improve- 
ments but did not, in CIO’s opin- 
ion, go far enough. Starting Feb. 
16, CIO witnesses will present 
two full days of testimony back- 
ing up the findings of the CIO 
Committee on Social Security, 
headed by TWVA Pres. Emil 
Rieve. 

It is tragic that a law so well- 
meant should come so perilously 
close to failure because it has not 
been revised to keep pace with 
changing economic conditions, and 
because it was not well drawn 
in the first place. 


Here are some flaws in the 71.6% of the labor force, the CIO 

present law and in HR 6000: proposal to almost 100%.) 

1. Benefits. The average benefit 3. Wage base. At present, em- 

paid out noWj after 12 years of ployer and employe each contrib- 
accuynulation of funds, is only $2Jt ute 1%% a year on the first $3000 

a month, which would have been of the worker’s income. The 

inadequate in 1939. It is so far theory was that most workers 

•out of sight now that state pay- were at the $3000 level or lower, 

ments for direct relief of the and that therefore, payments fi- 

absolutely destitute average nanced in this manner would ac- 

almost twice as much. Yet Social curately reflect wage losses. Now, 

Security is supposed to keep peo- however, 96% of all covered work- 

pie off the relief rolls! ers are at or below the $4800 

2. Coverage. The law now cov- level. Wages up to $4800 should 

ers only 35 million people-^;8% therefore be taxed, CIO feels. HR 

of the labor force. The rest must 6000 ups the level to only $3600. 
get along without even this 4^ Method of calculation. The 
earned pittance to look forward was so drawn that bene^ts 

are not paid on the basis of aver- 
(HR 6000 would raise benefits age wages actually received. In- 

an average of 70%; the CIO more stead, the “average” is pulled 

than that. For example: a man down by prolonged illness, unem- 

of 65 with a wife of 60 and no ployment, or work in an “un- 

other dependents, whose “average covered” job. A 55-year-old man 

wage” while he worked was $300 whose wages had averaged $500 

a month and who had contributed a month for 10 years would find 
to Social Security steadily for 20 his “average” down to $250 a 
years, would get $48 a month month by the- time he became 

under the present law, $71.50 a eligible for his first payment, if 

month under HR 6000, and $144 he had been unable to work after 

a month under the CIO proposal. 55. Hence his benefits would drop. 

HR 6000 extends coverage to HR 6000 remedies this some- 

Franco Is Accused Of 
Deception Attempt 

j^ICTATOR FRANCO is “at- 4 breakdown recently in Spain’s 

tempting to deceive the out- economic relations with Dictator 

side world when he claims there Peron of Argentina. The workers 

is no opposition to his regime made it impossible for Franco to 

within Spain,” Pres. Trifon Gomez carry out Spain’s end of the 

of the Spanish Confederation of agreement, Gomez said. 

Labor told a press conference at The exiled labor Reader pointed 
Washington. out that an amalgamation of Con- 

Gomez declared that informa- federation leaders with monarch- 

tion “gathered in all circles from ist groups after a 1948 conference 

extreme right to extreme left” in- in France put him in touch* with 

dicated that Spaniards could re- at least 80% of anti-totalitarian 

solve their internal problems labor inside Spain through a well 

peacefully and without fear that organized liaison system. This 

Franco’s Fascism would be re- pooling of resources has greatly 

placed by Communism, provided strengthened and stimulated anti- 

the world's democratic nations Franco activities, he reported, 

maintain the policy embodied in Gomez pointed out that he at- 
the United Nations resolution of tended the London conference at 

1946 under which UN members which the International Confed- 

withdrew their ambassadors from eration of Free Trade Unions 

Madrid. was established, bearing creden- 

Gomez said he thought slow- tials actually signed inside Spain 
downs by Spanish workers forced despite Franco’s police methods. 


what; it retains the same basic 
formula, but says that periods of 
total disability will not drag the 
average down. CIO says the bene- 
fits should simply be calculated 
on the basis of the average in- 
come received by the worker dur- 
ing his “best five years.” Both HR 
6000 and the CIO would provide 
for payments to the worker dur- 
ing periods of total disability; HR 
6000, however, would pay the 
worker only, providing nothing 
for dependents, whereas CIO 
would add dependents’ benefits as 
well. 

5. “Extra work.” The present 
law, as many oldsters have found 
to their sorrow, provides that if 
the retired worker tries to make 
ends meet by going back to work, 
he cannot earn more than $14.99 
a month in ^'covered” employment, 
without losing his entire benefit 
for that month. This has been 
softened somewhat by HR 6000; 
it allows extra earnings of up to 
$50 a month and makes only a 
pro-rata deduction for earnings 
beyond that figure. 

N O OTHER feature of the pres- 
ent law so clearly reveals the 
“them, as has, gits” philosophy 
which crept into it, unnoticed. 
What it amounts to is that only 
the near-destitute are penalized. 

If a worker has an insurance 
annuity to piece out with, if he 
has a savings bond or two matur- 
ing every month, if he has some 
stocks and bonds, he keeps his 
Social Security benefits, too, and 
no questions asked. 

But if he is without extra funds, 
he has two choices; go on relief, 
which in many states means sur- 
rendering title to whatever prop- 
erty he does own; or go back to 
work, if he can, in which case he 
risks losing his benefits, or at best 
is held to a total extra income of 
$50 a month. 

CIO’s pension program, which 
gave rise to, the sudden Congres- 
sional interest in revising Social 
Security, in no way competes with 
the law. It is regarded as a com- 
pletely necessary supplement to 
it. It is true that most pension 
contracts set a total payable pen- 
sion sum and then state that the 
company may subtract from this 
total the amount the retired 


worker receives in Social Secur- 
ity benefits; but at least the total 
the worker receives comes some- 
where near what he needs to 
maintain himself in decency. 

I NDUSTRY witnesses before the 
Senate Committee are putting 
up very little resistance to the 
proposed improvements because 
they flope they foresee a steady 
reduction in the amount they will 
have to put into employer- 
financed pension plans. 

The CIO will continue the fight 
on both fronts. 

4c * 

Meanwhile, in Camden, N. J:, a 
11-year-old moH named Albert E. 
Lobley is still trying to keep him- 
self and his wife alive on $48.81 a 
month. 

Lobley, a former CIO member, 
appeared last April 12 before the 
House Ways and Means Comynit- 
tee to testify in favor of HR 6000. 

At that time, nearly a year ago, 
he had used up all his savings, 
had exactly $h-in the bank, and 
was "'merely existing/^ The $48.81 
a month went entirely for food, 
and at that the Lobleys ate meat 
only once a week. His married 
son was paying the heavy doctor's 
bills for Lobley's crippled wife, 
Mrs. Lobley left the house only to 
go to the doctor's office. Neither 
of them had seen a movie in three 
years. They had no new clothes 
and no prospect of any. 

""Fortunately," Lobley told the 
Committee, ""I owned my own 
home. But immediately after re- 
tiring I was swamped with the ex- 
pense of paying medical bills. I 
therefore had to take out a $1000 
mortgage on my home . . . This 
borrowed money has long ago 
been spent ... It is being repaid 
by my son." 

The CIO News checked up on 
the Lobleys to see what might 
have happened to them while 
Congress stalled. They are just 
two of the 2,500,000 people now 
receiving Social Security benefits. 

""No change," Lobley reported. 
""We managed to take in a board- 
er .. . My son's expenses are in- 
creasing, and next spring I guess 
I'll just have to find a job." 

As we said before, he's 71 years 
old. 

There are now 12,000 unem- 
ployed in Camden. 



^'Because benefits are related to average earnings and hence reflect of right, following cessation of substantial covered employment, the 

the standard of living which an individual has achieved, ambition worker's dignity and independence are preserved." 

and effort are rewarded . . . Because benefits are paid as a matter — Report of the House Ways and Means Committee on HR 6000. 




ALBERT M. GREENFIELD (L), chairman of the fact-finding 
board in the Philadelphia trainsit wage dispute, and CIO Vice 
Pres. Allan S. Haywood shake hands at a hearing before the 
board. Pres. Michael Quill (r.) of the CIO Transport Workers, 
which represents the Philadelphia workers, is a smiling ob- 
server. Acceptance of findings averted a strike. 

Electoral College Revamp 
Amendment Passes Senate 


Help Me Fight NLRB, 
Denham Asks Again 


TWU Wins 
Pact Gains In 
Philadelphia 

T RE fact - FINDING com- 
mission technique was 
used successfully in Philadel- 
phia to win substantial con- 
tract gains for the CIO Trans- 
port Workers and to avert a 
threatened strike that would 
have tied up public transporta- 
tion in the nation's third larg- 
est city. 

The board’s recommendations, 
which will give members of TWU 
Local 234 additional benefits es- 
timated at $1.5 millions a year, 
were accepted by the local execu- 
tive board and the shop stewards, 
and were approved at a general 
membership meeting last week. 
A referendum vote., was being 
taken as this edition of the CIO 
News went to press, but there 
was no oppdsitioh in sight. 

The employes will receive most 
of the benefits in nOn-wage items, 
but the transportation depart- 
ment received a 2-cent per hour 
increase, raising the rate to $1.47 
an hours for operators, and the 
maintenance department got 5 
cents an hour to wipe out part of 
a long-standing inequity. 

P ENSIONS were increased by 
$10 a month to a minimum 
of $100, with most pensioners re- 
ceiving above the minimum. 
Many operators work split shifts 
during the morning and evening 
peak traffic periods. The inter- 
tervening time, known as “spread'' 
time, or “dead” time, has never 
been paid for, although it may 
run to six hours. Under the com- 
mission's recommendation it will 
now be paid for at straight time 
After three hours. 

Sick leave pay was boosted by 
$5 weekly and made effective at 
the beginning of an illness. In 
the past no benefits were paid 
4)r the first seven days. 

Job protection was streng- 
thened by a guaranteed work 
week and by freezing one-man op- 
eration at the present level. If 
the company wants to increase 
one-man operation, it must give 
the union 60 days’ notice and then 
work out a joint agreement. The 
union secured approximately 30 
of its 38 demands. 

I N VOTING reluctant acceptance 
of the recommendations, Phila- 
delphia Transportation Co. direc- 
tors instructed Pres. Charles M. 
Ebert to make the necessary pre- 
liminary moves to win a fare in- 
crease. During the commission 
hearings repeated attempts were 
made to line up union spokesmen 
and witnesses in favor of a boost, 
but with no' success. 

“We’re not financial wizards,” 
TWU Pres. Michael J. Quill 
bluntly told the commission. “It’s 
the bankers’ job to get up the 
money and it’s our job to take it 
away from them.” 

John O'Donnell, TWU general 
cousel, who presented the bulk 
of the union case and testified for 
seven hours on the first day of 
hearings, tartly suggested that a 
rise might be avoided, or at least 
reduced, if the city were to cut 
down the rental it receives for 
properties leased to PTC. 

Allan S. Haywood, CIO Vice 
President and director of organ- 
ization, was one of the witnesses 
for the union. He told the board 
that 100,000 CIO members live 
in the Philadelphia area and that 
there was no desire to inconven- 
ience either them or other citi- 
zens by a strike, but that if one 
were necessary the union would 
have solid CIO backing both lo- 
cally and nationally. 


A PROPOSED constitutional 
amendment revamping 
the system by which Ameri- 
cans have elected their Presi- 
dents over the last 145 years 
was approved last week by the 
U. S. Senate by a 64 to 27 vote. 

The measure was sponsored 
jointly by Sen. . Henry Cabot 
Lodge, Jr. (R., Mass.), and Rep. 
Gossett (D.,' Tex). Some support- 
ers claimed it scrapped the old 
electoral college system, While 
abolishing the college as such, 
however, it retained the basis of 
the system. 

It does not provide for direct 
election of the President by the 
people, which was urged by the 
last CIO Convention. An amend- 
ment to this effect, support of 
which was sought by CIO Legis- 
lative Director Nathan E. Cowan 
in telegrams to Senators, was of- 
fered by Sen. Humphrey (D., 
Minn.) but was defeated. 

The new plan provides for com- 
putation of electoral votes as at 
present — one for each member of 
Congress. 

The high candidate in any 
state, however, would not re- 


ceive all its electoral votes as at 
present. Instead they would be 
divided among all candidates in 
proportion to the number of votes 
cast. The vote in each state would 
be forwarded to a joint session 
of Congress, which would add up 
the totals. Should there be only 
two candidates, the one with the 
higher total would, pf course, 
win. If the top man among three 
or more candidates polled at 
least 40% of the electoral vote, 
he likewise would be declared 
elected. 

H owever, if no one received 
at least 40% of the electoral 
vote in a contest with three or 
) more candidates. Congress would 
pick the winner from the two 
highest at a joint session. Each 
member of the Senate and the 
House would have one vote, and 
a majority of the total member- 
ship would be necessary to elect. 

The amendment now goes to 
the House, where it must win by 
the same two-thirds majority it 
chalked up in the Senate. If ap- 
proved there, it must be ratified 
by two-thirds of the states — 33 — 
before it becomes part of the 
Constitution. 


G eneral counsel Robert 
N. Denham of the NLRB 
was around yelling for help 
again last week. 

Help, that is, in his fight with 
the NLRB members, who some- 
times have the nerve to disagree 
with him. 

This plantive little wail was 
sounded before a meeting of the 
American Trucking Association, 
Inc., in Washington. He hinted 
very broadly that members of 
that organization should haul 
before the courts any NLRB de- 
cisions against them they don't 
happen to like. Under Taft-Hart- 
ley, Denham has to defend these 
decisions when they do get into 
court. Just what kind of a de- 
fense they'd get is a little hard 
to figure. 

Two weeks earlier Denham 
made the same type of plea before 
an employers' group in New 
York. The reaction from union 
men and liberals wais terrific. CIO 
Pres. Philip Murray demanded 
that Pres. Truman oust him. 

Denham^s speech before the 
truckers' association was largely 
devoted to the secondary boycott. 
He found time, in addition to 
everything else, for a gratuitous 
attack on the AFL Teamsters’ 
Union. 

A SECONDARY boycott charge 
against a union is a pretty 
tough one to sustain, Denham 
said. Principally, he indicated, 
because the board members don't 
agree with his conceptions and 
partly, he hinted, because they 
keep changing •'their minds. 

“As I have said on other occa- 
sions,” he said, “the decisions of 
the board are not self-enforcing.” 

“If the board issues an order 
and wants to enforce it, it must 
go to the Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals and petition that court for 
an order of enfocement, at which 


F or two hours last week 
100 merchant ship offi- 
cers and crew members pick- 
eted the office of the Maritime 
Commission in New York in 


time the entire proceedings are 
reviewable for conformity to the 
law, but not as to the facts, if 
the record as a whole discloses 
substantial evidence to support 
the board’s findings. 

“By the same token, if the 
board should dismiss a case, or 
refuse some desired relief to a 
charging party, and that charg- 
ing party wants a review of the 
board’s action, it can only obtain 
such review in the Circuit Court 
of Appeals.” 

D enham referred to a case 
in which the NLRB rejected 
a secondary boycott charge as 
“one of a goodly number that 
seem like secondary boycotts un- 
til they get under the scrutiny of 
the board where we have found 
that our appraisal of the sec- 
ondary boycott feature of the law 
has been too broad.” 

“All things that look like sec- 
ondary boycotts to us of the 
General Counsel’s office and to 
the courts that are called on for 
injunctions,” he pouted a few 
paragraphs farther on, “don’t 
necessarily take on that aspect 
when they get up to the close 
scrutiny of the board ... 

“Until there have been some 
coordinating decisions of the 
courts clarifying th^se varying 
points of view, it is our theory 
in the office of the General Coun- 
sel that we must proceed on a 
case to case basis, and only ap- 
praise any given case after a 
thorough investigation of all the 
facts that has been completed. 

“To what extent the courts 
will have an opportunity to 
finally determine these questions 
will, of course, depend upon the 
extent to which the board goes 
to the court with its petition for 
enforcement, and the extent to 
which dissatisfied charging par- 
ties may go to the courts with 
their petitions for review.” 


protest against that body's 
continued approval of the 
transfer of American ships to 
foreign registries. 

The protest, which will be re- 
peated this week, was sponsored 
by the CIO Marine Engineers 
Beneficial Association through the 
Committee to Combat Ship Trans- 
fers. 

It was touched off by Maritime 
Commission approval for the 
transfer of six T-2 type oil tank- 
ers, built during the war, to Pan- 
amanian registry. The vessels 
are owned by the National Bulk 
Carriers Corp. 

The approval was conditioned 
upon the company's replacing 
them with tankers of equal capa- 
city registered under the Ameri- 
can flag. 

Shifting registry of American 
flag ships to foreign countries has 
become a favorite practice of ship 
owners seeking to avoid the wages 
and working conditions built up 
by American maritime unions. 

Panama, Honduras and Liberia 
are the favorite “runaway” spots. 
They have no laws under which 
seamen can sue operators for com- 
pensation for injuries received 
aboard ship, and in addition have 
wage and tax rates substantially 
lower than in this country. Mean- 
time, American maritime work- 
ers are without jobs because the 
vessels on which they once 
worked now fly the flags of other 
nations. 



FOR THE FIRST TIME in 34 years, Ash- 
tabula, Ohio, City Council is controlled by 
the Democrats. This occurred when three 
CIO-PAC backed candidates were elected to 
the City Council. They in turn elected a 
manager. Pictured are CIO and PAC officials 
together with the newly-elected city officers. 
L. to R., front row, John Thornton, Steelwork- 
ers Dist. 26 PAC Director; Gerald Severino 
and Ed Walsh, councilmen; Dennis Dunlevy, 


city manager; Anthony Jurano, councilman; 
and Fred Saverice, Steelworkers staff mem- 
ber. Back row, L. to R., Dist. 26 radio com- 
mentator Eddie Weygandt; CIO Council Pres. 
Nelson Humphries ; PAC financial-secy. Ed 
Wrisley; CIO Council Vice Chairman Don 
Freeborn ; CIO Council Chairman Walter Ash- 
ley and Dist. 26 Rep. James McPhillips. La- 
verne Halsey, chairman of Ashtabula County 
PAC, was not present when this was taken. 


N 


Picket Maritime Commission 
In Transfer of Six U. S. Ships 


10 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 6, 1»50 


It’s Snowing Requests 
For 75c Exemptions 

IS NOT yet clear sail- 


ing under the amended 
Federal wage-hour law in- 
creasing the minimum wage 
to 75e, which went into effect 
Jan. 25. 

Changes in the law have thrown 
out of kilter many of the regu- 
lations built up since the law was 
passed in 1938. 

This means that stacks of re- 
vised regulations and orders gear- 
ing the 75c minimum and other 
changes into administration of the 
law have to be issued. 

The law authorizes the wage- 
hour administrator to make spe- 
cial regulations interpreting and 
clarifying provisions concerning 
rates for apprentices or learners, 
handicapped workers and others 
barred from the 75c minimum by 
special certification. 

Employers seeking to avoid pay- 
ment of the 75c minimum have 
been quick to use all possible 
loopholes of the law, and have 
snowed the Wage-Hour agency 
under with applications for ex- 
emptions. 

The adfhinistrator has met the 
situation so far by completely 
withdrawing all previous rates 
set for for learners in some in- 
dustries, and issuing temporary 
regulations in others. 

Regulations Involving learners 

UAW, lAM In 
Peace Pact 

T he CIO AUTO workers and 
the International Association 
of' Machinists, independent, have 
signed an agreement to refrain 
from raiding each other’s rhem- 
berships, according to Labor Secy. 
Tobin. 

UAW Pres. Walter Reuther and 
A. J. Hayes of lAM have agreed 
to avoid jurisdiction rivalries 
which in the past have caused 
some serious strikes in organized 
plants. 

Each union, however, retains 
freedom of action to compete in 
the organization of non-union 
pi;*ojects. 

Congratulating both organiza- 
tions, iTobin said, “This pact be- 
tween two great unions has been 
negotiated without intervention 
or pressure by the government in 
any form. I believe this move can 
be a major contribution toward 
industrial peace through the re- 
moval of unnecessary jurisdic- 
tional disputes. Certainly it is 
evidence that organized labor can 
work out its own internal prob- 
lems voluntarily and without 
Government intervention.” 

ILWU Leaders 
Say Sign T-H 

Officers of the CIO Longshore- 
men’s Union have recommended 
to the executive board and locals 
compliance with the Taft-Hartley 
act. The union, headed by Harry 
Bridges, has been bitterly opposed 
to the T-H act, and its officers 
have refused to sign non-Com- 
munist affidavits. Bridges is now 
on trial, accused of perjury in 
swearing he had never been a 
Communist when he applied for 
citizenship in 1945. 

Louis Goldblatt, ILWU secre- 
tary-treasurer, said the decision 
to reverse the union’s position 
was made “to meet any raiding 
attack from AJPL or other CIO 
unions.” 


have been withdrawn in the mil- 
linery, woolen, artificial flower, 
the main part of the apparel, and 
the textile industries. Temporary 
regulations have been granted 
for the hosiery, glove, knitwear, 
and cigar industries, and the cot- 
ton garment segment of the ap- 
parel industry. 

In general, the temporary rates 
for learners bring the former 
rates of 30c and 35c up to 60c 
and 65c. 

Learners rates in the various 
industries will be established per- 
manently in some cases after pub- 
lic hearings are held, and in oth- 
erv.cases upon application from in- 
dividual companies or employers. 

Hearings on learners rates in 
the, shoe industry have already 
started but were adjourned to 
permit further study. Meanwhile 
some individual shoe employers 
have applied for and received 
certification to pay subminimum 
rates for learners. The general 
pattern for the applications acted 
upon has been 65c for the first 
six weeks, and 70c for the rest 
of the 12-week training period. 

The CIO United Shoe Workers 
has protested the granting of 
certification to shoe employers to 
pay subminimum rates to learn- 
ers, pointing out that the indus- 
try previously had never been 
granted exemptions for learners 
on an indukry-wide basis. 



Third 

More 


of U. S. 
Than It 


Spends 

Earns 


42.-gl5DC3-l53 © 1950 


“Miss Reed, your union contract 
says you must give thirty days 
notice before you strike.” 

I 

Ohio CIO Leaves 
Safety Code Parley 

Representatives of manage- 
ment have given conclusive proof 
that they do not honestly want 
factory safety codes that ade- 
quately protect workers, accord- 
ing to the Ohio CIO Council. 

The Council said management 
representatives flatly refused a 
request by labor representatives 
for competent technical advice on 
new codes. 

As a result, Sec.-Treas. Jacob 
dayman of the Ohio CIO Council 
reported, CIO members on the 
safety code committee have pres- 
ently broken off negotiations with 
management. 


A THIRD of all family and 
individual spending units 
spent more than they earned 
in 1948. That dramatic evi- 
dence of the need for better 
distribution of income to pro- 
vide the purchasing power 
needed to avoid a depression 
has been revealed by a Fed- 
eral Reserve survey. 

Those who spent more than 
they earned came to 31%; another 
6% used up all their spending 
power, but did not go into debt 
because in most cSses they had no 
credit. Yet it is among the middle 
and lower income brackets that 
mass purchasing power must orig- 
inate if we are to consume the 
goods and services our mass pro- 
duction industries turn out. 

These figures strongly back up 
the demand of labor and govern- 
ment economists for expanded 
purchasing power in the lower 
and middle income groups. Ever 
since the postwar inflation started 
the President’s Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisers has been warning 
of the need, for such expansion if 
purchasing power is to be suffi- 
cient to buy the goods produced 
by American industry without 
widespread unemployment. 

The Federal Reserve survey 
showed that while corporations 





mmmmmsm 




By ALLAN S. HAYWOOD 

(As Mr. Haywood is in Puerto Rico this week, his 
column is comprised of field reports.) 

The Communications Workers of America-CIQ 
has recorded another notable gain in its march 
toward complete CIO organizing of all telephone 
workers as a result of an election among the 13,000 
workers affiliated with the Ohio Federation of Tele- 
phone Workers. The vote was as follows: Votes 
cast, 12,727; CWA-CIO, 7535; IBEW- 
AFL, 4064; void, 48; challenged, 257; 

: no union, 1128. The victory was 
; especially notable since every type 
; of attack, particularly the “fear 
; technique,” was utilized in opposi- 
I tion to CWA-CIO. 

The Company and IBEW propa- 
ganda laid particular stress on the 
strike vote taken by CWA, attempt- 
ing to frighten the Ohio workers 
out of affiliating with CWA-CIO. 
Pees. Thomas Ryan of the Ohio 
Federation of Telephone Workers was a stalwart 
leader in the campaign for CWA-CIO, participating 
actively in conveying to the workers the advantages 
of affiliation with a great national union that can 
stand up and fight even the gigantic AT&T. CWA 
Pres. Joseph Beirne also actively participated in 
the election. 

CIO Reg. Dir. George DeNucci reports that in an 
NLRB election at the Grossman Co., Columbus, the 
Playthings & Jewelry Workers-CIO were victorious 
by a vote of 45 to 19. Rep. Edward Rosenhahn 
was in charge of the election. 

CIO Reg. Dir. James J. Leary reports that Dir. 
D. R. Stewart of District 5, Oil Workers Interna- 
tional Union, says the following elections were 
won by his union: Union shop election at the Bay 
Petroleum, McPherson, Kans., by a vote of 50 for, 
4 against; representation election at the National 
Cooperative Railway Assn., McPherson, Kans., 133 
for, 28 against. Both elections were directed for 
OWIU-CIO by Rep. Loyd Haskins. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Sylvester Graham reports a union 
shop election at thfe Fruehauf Trailer Co., of Bill- 
ings, Mont., on behalf of United Steelworkers of 
America, Local 3169. Result was 100% in favor of 
the union shop. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Irwin DeShetler reports the Auto 
Workers won a union shop election at Eason Grind- 
ing Co., Los Angeles, Calif., by a vote of 92% in 
favor of UAW. UAW Inti. Rep. Richard Cartwright 
was in charge. 


CIO Reg. Dir. John B. Easton reports the United 
Steelworkers of America won a consent election 
for clerical and office employees at the Houdaille- 
Hershey plant, Huntington, W. Va., by a vote of 
38 to 17. Staff Rep. Frank Cornwell, conducted the 
organizing campaign. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Ldren Houser reports that the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers, who have had a 
plant under contract for the last nine years in 
Portland, Ind., had their representation challenged 
by the UAW-AFL. An NLRB election was held and 
the Clothing Workers won, 2 to 1. The company 
is the Jay Garment Co. The campaign was con- 
ducted by Reps. Harold Wilson and Nelson Joseph. 

CIO Reg. Dir. W. B. Taylor reports that in a 
representation election held at the Mengel Com- 
pany, Louisville, Ky., IWA-CIO won by a vote of 
875 to 185. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Delmond Garst reports the fol- 
lowing victories'. Federal Paper Co., St. Louis, Mo., 
representation election 62 for CIO Textile Workers, 
11 against; Royal Bedding Co., St. Louis, union 
shop election, CIO Textile Workers 48, 11 against. 
TWUA Rep. William A. Doyle was in charge. 

CIO Reg. Dir. George Craig reports the following 
election victories: Union shop election at the Aldan 
Rubber Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 74 for the United 
Rubber Workers, 2 against; Eugene Tormey, URC- 
LPWA Representative, was in charge; United Pa- 
perworkers of America won an election at National 
Waterproof Papers, Inc., Philadelphia, 59 to 6; 
Spence Condiff was in charge; Playthings, Jewelry 
& Novelty Workers won at the Hanassin Products, 
Inc., Philadelphia, by a vote of 14 to 0; Textile 
Workers won an election at Stafford & Company, 
Philadelphia, by a vote of 103 to 31; James Coyle 
and Walter Ellis were in charge; Textile Workers* 
also won an election at the Wilson Yarn Mills, 
Philadelphia, by 24 to 19. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Frank Bonacci reports that the 
United Packinghouse Workers-CIO won a repre- 
sentation election at the Poultry Plant, Provo, 
Utah, and secured a bargaining agency for 11 work- 
ers. The plant is a branch of the Utah Poultry 
Cooperative Association. UPWA-CIO Rep.- Ora 
Owen was in charge. 

CIO Sub-Reg. Dir. John J. Muarillo reports that 
in a representation election at the Sylvania Elec- 
tric Corp., Seneca Falls, N. Y., the USA-CIO de- 
feated the IBEW-AFL by 253 to 204. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Irwin DeShetler reports a union 
shop election victory for Amalgamated Clothing 
Workers Local 55D at Clinton Clothes Co.’s seven 
stores in the Los Angeles area by a vote of 33 yes, 

6 no. 


were making record - breaking 
profits of more than $20 billion 
in 1948, low and middle income 
families were having a harder 
and harder'time making ends meet. 
Thirty-eight per cent of the 
families and individual spending 
units under $1000 a year spent 
more than they took in, while 
another 27% just managed to 
break even. Only a third were 
able ‘to save anything. This was 
far worse than the year before, 
when only 26% spent more than 
they made, 

I N THE INCOME group between 
$1000 and $2000, 34% of the 
spending units spent more than 
they took in, and another 9% just 
broke even. Spending beyond in- 
come was not confined to the 
lower income groups, however, 
but went well up the income scale 
throughout the middle income 
brackets. 

The Federal Reserve research- 
ers reported that the number of 
families spending more than they 
took in had jumped steadily since 
the end of the war, and most 
sharply since 1946, when the in- 
flation began to get out of hand. 
It was most severe among fam- 
ilies in which incomes had been 
rapidly changing, rather than 
those where incomes had been 
stable. 

Most of the families which 
spent more than they took in dur- 
ing 1948 were not going into debt, 
but using up past savings. This 
indicates strongly that spending 
among these groups will drop un- 
less there is a better distribution 
of income in the future. Many of 
these families in 1948 were still 
using up savings accumulated dur- 
ing the war, when the distribution 
of savings was more balanced. 

The number of spending units 
which spent more than they 
earned in 1948 was 15,500,000. Al- 
together, they spent about $12 
billion more than they earned, in- 
dicating the rapidity with which 
they are using up past earnings. 
The rest of the spending units 
, saved a total of $24 billion, but 
' most of it was in the top 5% in- 
come units. (LPA). See Nathan 
Robertson’s story, page 12. 

3 States Try 
To Bar ABC 

A TTY. GEN. FAIRCHILD of 

Wisconsin is the latest state 
law enforcement official to ask 
for an injunction to bar the 
American Bowling Congress on 
charges that it discriminates 
against Negroes and other colored 
persons. The complaint charged 
that ABC and its practices “con- 
stitute a public nuisance.” 

Atty. Gen. Nathaniel L. Gold- 
stein of New York State in Jan, 
has asked an injunction against 
the “whites only” American Bowl- 
ing Congress, to bar it from spon- 
soring tournaments and carrying 
out other activities in the state. 

Goldstein asked the New York 
Supreme Court to enjoin the or- 
ganization because its constitu- 
tion, limiting membership to 
“white males,” is against the pub- 
lic policy of the state. 

“I know that the American peo- 
ple do not tolerate bias in sports,” 
Goldstein said. “Racial standards 
must never be set up as a test of 
athletic ability.” 

Last October, the Illinois At- 
torney general took similar ac- 
tion against the Congress there, 
after the national CIO had an- 
nounced in Washington that it 
was seeking revocation of the 
group’s charter. 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 6, 1950 

lit i ,ii % M .. jii ‘i ' ■ ^ ", !;i - ^ ! a 5' 


11 



Fat Profits Foe of Jobs For All 


By NATHAN ROBERTSON 

For Labor Press Association 

A mericans goal of maxi- 
mum production and em- 
ployment on a sustained basis 
is seriously threatened by the 
demand of big business for 
higher profits than industry 
has ever before enjoyed. 

This has been made clear within 
the last couple of weeks by: 

I The Federal Trade Commis- 
* Sion report showing that most 
big business today is making 
profits of about 20% — or even 
more — on invested capital, after 
payment of all taxes, compared 
with half that before the war. 

2 Testimony before the Joint 
* Congressional Economic Com- 
mittee by sopkesmen for the steel 
industry that it must have higher 
profits than ever before. Few of 
the spokesmen were willing to 
make a figure — but those who 
did, suggested 18 to 24% after 
taxes — indicating that steel’s idea 
of a fair profit is about the same 
as industry’s in general. 

These two developments show 
clearly that big business, which 
in many cases is powerful enough 
to fix its own profit figures with- 
out worrying about competition, 
is demanding a bigger slice of 
national income than it has en- 


serious than the one that almost 
wrecked our economy from 1929-33. 

The reason is this. Even con- 
servative economists have agreed 
that our problem is to maintain 
purchasing power to buy the 
things we know how to make in 
such quantities. That purchasing 
power comes mainly from con- 
sumers who want goods and from 
business which wants new and 
better plants for production. 

The problem is to maintain the 
balance between these two kinds 
of demand. If too much goes into 
business expansion we soon are 


turning out more goods than con- 
sumers can buy. If too little goes 
into business expansion we stop 
growing and become static — our 
goal of a higher living standard 
is gone. 

Most economists believe — on 
the basis of past experiences — 
that we tend in good times such 
as now to put too much purchas- 
ing power in the hands of busi- 
ness through big profits, so that 
business expands too rapidly. 
They think we must find a way 
to maintain steady, but more mod- 
erate expansion, and put- the lesrt: 


of the purchasing power into the 
hands of consumers so they can 
buy the expanding production. 
They do not believe this can be 
done if industry demands a profit 
of 20% on invested capital after 
the payment of all taxes. 

Government economists — in- 
cluding those advising the Presi- 
dent — have felt throughout the 
post-war era that more purchasing 
power than was healthy was going 
into the hands of business, and too 
little into the hands of the con- 
sumers. That is why the Presi- 
dent’s Council of Economic Ad- 


visers has repeatedly pushed for 
high wages and lower prices, to 
lower the profit margir^for busi- 
ness so that consumer buying 
power could keep pace with our 
productive power. See story on 
Third of Nation, Page 11. 

Read It And Weep ... 


U. S. Steel Pays Extra Dividend 
Despite Plea of Low Profits 


U S. STEEL — which had just 
• finished complaining that its 
profits were miserably low — last 
week did a somersault. 

The complaint had been made 
to a Congressional Committee in- 
vestigating recent steel prices. 

The somersault came in the 
form of a special extra dividend 
to company stockholders. At the 
same time the company an- 
nounced its profits had reached 
a 30-year high of nearly $166 
million after taxes. 

Profits in 1949 were about $37 
million higher than in the previous 
year. Irving Olds; U S. Steel 
board chairman, complained that 


the six-weeks st^:ike of CIO Steel- 
workers had chopped an estimated 
$37 million from the company’s 
profit level. 

The strike occurred when the 
company refused union demands 
for welfare and pension pro- 
grams, which a Presidential Fact 
Finding Board last summer said 
could have been paid out of 
profits without an increase in price. 

The Big Steel profit bulletin 
confirmed that 1949 had been a 
pretty good year indeed for the 
industry. Bethlehem earlier had 
reported a new record of $99 
million profits after taxes. 


T he profits— and the strike 
and the Congressional probe 
have apparently combined to 
make U. S. Steel conscious of its 
public relations. 

The corporation announced that 
Phelps Adams had been appointed 
— at a $35,000 salary— to a post 
of special public relations ad- 
viser in the corporation’s New 
York headquarters. 

Adams was formerly, chief of 
the Washington bureau of the 
New York Sun, the big city’s 
most reactionary, anti-labor paper. 
That paper recently went out of 
business, because of lack of 
circulation and advertising. 


»t/U. S. Steel Ups 
Dividend Rate 
To 65 Cents 

By tht Associated Press 

NEW YpRK, Jan. 31.— Direc- 
tors of United States Steel Corp. 
[today increased the dividend on ' 
common stock to 65 cents a 
share, payable March 10 to hold- 
ers of recotd February 10. 

Payments of 60 cents had been ^ 
made quarterly since the stock [ 
was split 3-for-l last May 12.- 
The dividend action came after 
the corporation reported net in- 
come for 1949 of $165,958,806, the 
highest in 20 years. This was , 
equal to $5.39 a common share 
and compared with $129,627,845 
or $4 a share in 1948. 

For the fourth quarter only, 
which •reflected the shutdown ' 
during the strike, U. S. Steel 
earned $32,735,397 equal to $1.01 
a share. Income for the preceding 
fhree months was $39,171,144 or 
1.26 a share. 

The strike began Oct. 1 and i 
.asted 42 days. 


mi- 

. . . For Poor U.S. Steel 




Senate Unit OK on Co-Op Housing Expected 


joyed in the past and bigger than 
most economists believe it can 
receive without throwing our eco- 
nomic machinery out of kilter. 

If we are to reach o’ ?:oal, 
fixed in the employment of 
1946 as maximum production and 
employment, and designed under 
President Truman’s program to 
triple our standard of living 
within the next 50 years, we 
must face the fact of this demand 
from industry for higher profits. 
There is no question about the 
power of much of industry to 
realize that demand. The issue is 
— what do we do about it? 

E ither we must revise our eco- 
economic plans or we must 
convince industry through educa- 
tion or legislation that such 
profits are dangerous. We cannot 
get the kind of economy we have 
planned if industry is allowed to 
continue to take such profits. It 
does not leave enough money in 
the hands of consumers to buy the 
products that industry produces. 
Sooner or later it will head us 
into a depression — a depression 
that is likely to be far more 

Fewer Mich. Strikes 

Man-hours lost in Michigan 
through strikes dropped 25% in 
1949, compared to 1948, state sta- 
tistics show, and there were 
fewer strikes. The state’s biggest 
strikes in 1949 were the Ford and 
steel walkouts which accounted 
for more than two-thirds of the 
man-hours lost. Both resulted in 
union victories. 

McDonald Chosen 

Secy.-Treas David J. McDonald 
of the CIO Steelworkers has been 
appointed to the board of direc- 
tors of the USO Campaign Com- 
mittee of Pennsylvania, according 
to H. Ward Zimmer, USO state 
chairaian. 


A DRAFT OF the middle- 
income housing bill prob- 
ably will be completed by a 
Senate Banking Committee 
sub-committee this week, 
Chairman Sparkman (D. Ala.) 
announced last Friday. 


The announcement followed by 
a few days publication of a report 
on cooperative housing in Europe 
prepared . by the sub-committee 
on the basis of an inspection and 
study trip last summer. 

The report declared that Euror 
pean cities and countries the com- 
mittee visited have done a better 


job of slum elimination than this 
country, the result being that 
“we did not see any slums that 
compare with some right in our 
Nation’s Capital.” 

While co-operative housing sys- 
tems have met “with much suc- 
cess” in Euro'pe and low cost gov- 
ernment-sponsored housing addi- 


tionally has contributed to slum 
clearance, private housing con- 
tinues to make progress abroad. 
The chief advantages claimed for 
co-ops are their ability to erect 
large scale projects with all ad- 
vantages of mass purchasing and 
construction, the committee found. 

I T ALSO FOUND that every 
country visited is continuing its 
wartime rent controls. 

The committee gave the im- 
pression that it felt apartment 
construction in the United States 
is just beginning to catch up with 
Europe. 

“We saw a large number, of 
apartments and houses for the 
average family built 20 to 30 years 
ago that were modern in design 
and layout,” the report said. “The 
garden type only recently coming 
into its own in this country is 
commonplace, ,and very few of 
the houses built in the last decade 
or two were not built in accord- 
ance with a neighborhood and 
community plan.” 

The report also said : 

“While people in European 
cities are more apt to live in an 
apartment or flat than they are 
in our country, it often seemed 
that we were behind our Euro- 
pean brothers in trying to provide 
adequate housing for our people.” 

S EN. FLANDERS (R. Vt.) held 
up co-operatives in business 
and housing as a possible alterna-. 
tive to pure private enterprise 
and State “socialism” or Commu- 
nism at a Harvard University con- 
ference on co-operative housing. 
Flanders is a member of the Sen- 
ate sub-committee which toured 
Europe. He described the co-op- 
erative movement as “a valuable 
adjunct to U. S. economy.” 

Leo N. Goodman, director of 
the CIO Housing Committee, and 
Pres. J. William Belanger of the 
Massachusetts Industrial Union 
Council were among sponsors of 
the meeting. 


IT 

1 f"l/l 



9 I will ^ 7 * 


BILL 

WHAT IT DOES 

WHERE IT IS 

WHAT TO DO 

Fair Employment 
Practices Commission 
S. 1728 

HR 4453 

Bars discrimination in 
industry based on race, 
creed or color; provides 
penalties for job bias. 

Senate bill on calendar, 
may come up next 
month. House support- 
ers seeking to get bill 
on floor for debate. 

Write, wire Senators, 
Congressmen to sup- 
port and seek earliest 
possible vote. 

Middle-Income 

Housing Bill 

S. 2246 

HR 6618 

Provides for long-term, 
low-interest U. S. loans 
to co-ops for building 
moderate - cost housing 
projects, etc. 

Senate Banking Com- 
mittee has completed 
hearings; House hear- 
ings now in progress. 

vAsk Senators, Congress- 
men to give bill full 
support. 

Social Security 
Improvements 

HR 6000 

Extends, improves old 
age, survivors benefits, 
etc., under social se- 
curity. Lifts benefits, 
ups coverage by 11 
million. 

Passed House last ses- 
sion. Senate Finance 
Comm, now holding 
hearings. CIO to ask 
further improvements 
in House bill. 

Ask Senators to try to 
strengthen HR 6 0 0 0 
over present provisions. 

Federal Aid 

To Education 

S. 246 

Provides over $300 mil- 
lion aid to states for 
schools ; gives states 
broad power to super- 
vise use of funds. 

Bill, approved by CIO, 
has passed Senate. Has 
been stuck in House La- 
bor Comm, for months. 

Ask members of House 
Labor Comm, to OK 
Senate bill. 

Labor Extension 

Service Bill 

S. 110 

HR 1380 

Provides workers' edu- 
cation program in coop- 
eration with schools, 
unions, Labor Dept. 

Approved b y Senate 
Labor Comm. House 
Labor Comm, is still 
studying bill. 

Ask Senators, Congress- 
men to seek early pas- 
sage. 

Mundt-Ferguson 

Bill 

S. 2311 

Bill endangers civil lib- 
erties, union rights 
under guise of fighting 
subversive activities. 

CIO opposed bill at 
hearings last year. Sen- 
ate Judiciary Comm, 
may bring out revised 
bill. 

Ask Senators to oppose 
bill as dangerous to 
civil rights. 

(Address all Senators at Senate Office Building, Washington 25, D. 0. 

Address all Representatives at House Office Building, Washington 25, D. C.) 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 6, 1950 


12 



Weivs 


Vol. XIII 


WASHINGTON. D. C.. FEBRUARY 13, 1950 


No. 7 


<> L'.^J 


The strongest bond of human sympathy 

OUTSIDE OF THE FAMILY RELATION SHOULD BE 
ONE UNITING ALL WORKING PEOPLE OF ALL 
NATIONS AND TONGUES AND KINDREDS 

I 

. ' ' Abraham Lincoln 





UGPWA Loses Its Suit 
To Prevent Hearings 


A LEGAL attempt by the 
United Office and Profes- 
sional Workers to stop the 
Natl. CIO from holding hear- 
ings on charges that it is Com- 
munist - dominated, and if 
guilty liable to expulsion, was 
lost last week. 

Judge Burnita Shelton Mat- 
thews, in U. S. District Court at 
Washington, on Feb. 6 dismissed 
a UOPWA petition for a prelimi- 
nary injunction restraining the 
CIO from proceeding with hear- 
ings and ousting the union if the 
evidence justified. Nine other in- 
ternational unions face similar 
chai ges. 

CIO Pres. Philip Murray said 
the CIO is “gratified” with Judge 
Matthews’ decision. 

“Judge Matthews' ruling fully 
sustains the validity of the con- 


stitutional amendment adopted at 
the last CIO convention barring 
Communist-dominated unions from 
continued affiliation with the CIO. 
The judge’s opinion likewise con- 
firms the procedures followed by 
the CIO in connection with cur- 
rent investigations against certain 
affiliates charged with Communist 
domination.” 

Further hearings were held in 
National CIO headquarters on 
Feb. 6 on the charges against, 
the UOPWA and the Mine, Mill 
and Smelter Workers. Hearings 
have been completed on charges 
against the United Public Work- 
ers and the Food and Tobacco 
Workers. Still awaiting hearings 
are the Longshoremen and Ware- 
housemen, Marine Cooks and 
Stewards, Furniture Workers, 
American Communications Asso- 
ciation, Fishermen, and Fur and 
Leather Workers. 


Brewery Union 
Security Won 

Expanded security benefits af- 
fecting 10,000 brewery workers 
and their families were won in 
recent negotiations betw^n the 
CIO Brewery Workers and the 
Brewers Board of 'Trade in New 
York City, William Greenstein, 
secretary of the union’s joint 
board, announced last week. 

Both employes and their fam- 
ilies will receive life insurance, 
accident and sickness benefits, 
and hospital insurance, with the 
premiums paid by the employ- 
ers. Previously, these benefits 
covered only employes. 


Mich., Big S. F. Local 
Want UFW To Stay CIO 

IMPORTANT nev^ support for 


GM Electrical* Division Vote 
Ordered For Feb. 28 by NLRB 


lORE THAN 28,000 Gen- 
eral Motors, Electrical 
Division, workers will vote in 
an NLRB election Feb. 28 to 
determine their collective bar- 
gaining agent. 

Their choice will be between 
the new International Union of 
Electrical, Radio and Machine 
Workers, CIO, and the United 
Electrical, Radio and Machine 
Workers, expelled from the CIO 
last fall on a charge that it was 
Communist dominated. 

The locals involved will be: Lo- 
cal 801, Frigidaire, Dayton, O., 
14,500 members; Local 755, Delco, 
Dayton, 7000; Local 717, Packard, 
Warren, O., 3500; Local 509, Delco 
Appliances, Rochester, N. Y., 3000; 
Local 416, Delco-Remy, New 
Brunswick, N. J., 400. 

T he election comes almost 
four months after lUE-CIO 
petitioned the NLRB for an elec- 
tion among GM workers. In the 
interim, both the NLRB and the 
tJE used .every conceivable means 
to delay, or, in the case of UE, 
avert, an election, lUE leaders 
charge. 

UE, in December, went into 
federal court to seek an injunc- 
tion against hearings in the GM 
case. Its attorneys, once they 
failed in that move, used every 
delaying tactic possible to pro- 
long the hearings. 

While UE, in an attempt to 
convince the workers it was for 
quick elections, publicly asked for 
them, its representatives used 
completely opposite tactics in the 
hearing sessions, according to 
Benjamin Sigal, lUE-CIO at- 
torney. 

Dayton has served as the head- 
quarters for the lUE-CIO cam- 
paign in GM. There, the two 
large locals have been pro-CIO 
for several years. Robert Eisner 
is president of 801 and E. J. 
Kraft holds the same position at 
755. 

William Snoots, secretary of the 
administrative committee, lUE- 
CIO, is a member of Local 755. 
Running on a CIO platform, he 
was elected president of UE Dis- 
trict 7 (state of Ohio) before the 
expulsion. 

The other three locals also have 
a record of consistent support of 
CIO policy. Sid Sayers is presi- 
dent of 717, Frank Murray of 599 
and Harold K. Merrill of 416. All 
held the jobs under UE. 

In its Canadian district, No. 5, 


lUE-CIO last week won another 
NLRB victory over UE, taking 
a 19-1 triumph at Copper Wire 
Products, Guelph, Ont. 


Red Caps At Bat 
For Passenger 

CIO redcaps went to bat 
through their union recently for 
railroad passengers who use four 
of the country’s largest terminals. 

Pres. Willard S. Townsend of 
the CIO Transport Service Em- 
ployes, and Leon M. Despres, 
counsel for the union, protested 
before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission against increasing 
the price for carrying a suitcase 
from 15c to 25c at terminals in 
Cincinnati,^ Columbus, Indianapo- 
lis and St. Louis. Union mem- 
bers, Townsend pointed out, are 
on salary and will derive nothing 
from the price hike. 


fight to keep the United Furni- 
ture Workers in the CIO was 
reported last week from two 
widely scattered fronts in the 
nation-wide battle against the 
Communists. 

In San Francisco, Calif., the 
1200 members of Local 262, in 
separate meetings -for day and 
night shift workers, voted unani- 
mously to back Pizer and other 
pro-CIO leaders in the conflict 
with Communist party liners. 
They indorsed his declaration of 
policy, which had been rejected 
by the sleft wing-dominated UFW 
general executive board, and 
voted to affiliate with the Na- 
tional UFW Rank and File Com- 
mittee for the CIO, organized re- 
cently to take the pro-CIOers’ 
stand before the membership. 

The union’s Michigan District 
Council, at a meeting in Ionia, 
Mich., unanimously adopted a 
resolution indorsing Pizer’s stand. 
Local representatives attending 
the meeting determined to join 
the rank and file committee and 
pledged financial support. 

The big San Francisco local 
ha:s long been one of the pro- 


Unemployment Is Highest In Eight Years 


E mployment declined by 
1,609,000 in January to 
sehd the number of the na- 
tion’s jobless up to 4,480,000 — 
the largest since September, 
1941, Secy, of Commerce Saw- 
yer reported last week. 

The report was based on a Cen- 
sus Bureau survey made the sec- 
ond week in January. It showed 
that 56,947,000 people were still 
working and that another 1,408,000 
were in the armed forces. 

Sawyer tried to gloss over the 
situation by stressing the fact 
that bad weather had cut into 
farm and construction employ- 
ment, and the added fact that 
many of the vanished jobs con- 
sisted of Christmas openings. 

He took comfort because indus- 
trial employment “did not appear 
to be seriously affected” com- 
pared with a year ago, when cut- 
backs accounted for a larger part 
of the January job slump. 

I N TESTIMONY before the Joint 
Congressional Committee on 


Food Prices Rise 

The same week that the U. S. 
government reported a postwar 
high in unemploymnt. Dun & 
Bradstreet announced that its 
wholesale food price index was 
at its highest level since Sept. 
13, 1949. 

The index for the week end- 
ing Feb. 7 stood at $5.80, com- 
pared to $5.79 the previous 
week and $5.66 a year ago. On 
last Sept. 13 it peaked at $5.85. 
Dun & Bradstreet attributed the 
bulk of the increase to a rise 
in the price of beef. 


the Economic Report less than a 
month ago, Everett N. Kassalow, 
executive secretary of the CIO 
Full Employment Committee, said 
that in 55 of the 100 major U. S. 
promotion centers 7% or more of 
the workers were unemployed. 

(Now, in more than 33% of the 
centers, 12% or more of the 
workers are jobless. In addition. 


several million are working only 
part time.) 

One of the contributing factors 
to increasing unemployment is 
the failure of industry to plow 
back some of its profits into ex- 
panded production which mighl;^ 
be reflected in lowered prices and 
a consequent increased demand, 
Kassalow told the committee. 

(In IQlfS U. S. corporations dis- 
tributed $7.9 billion in dividends. 
Profits were somewhat smaller 
last year, but the liquid cash po- 
sition of industry was so strong 
that dividend distribution jumped 
to $8.4 billion.) 

The CIO has warned frequently 
of increasing unemployment un- 
less prices are cut or wages in- 
creased, and job opportunities 
expanded. It has long urged an 
expanded housing program, plans 
for development ^ of resources, 
equitable taxes, an expanded so- 
cial security program — more than 
one-third of all workers are un- 
covered by the present program 
— and a $1 per hour minimum 
wage if the country’s economy is 
to stay healthy. 



MISS UTAH OF 1950 is Miss Joanne Hinand 
of Provo (r.), daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Hinand, also in the photo. Hinand is grievance 
committeeman of Provo Local 2701 at Geneva 


Steel. His glamorous daughter is 18, five feet, 
six and a half inches tall, weighs 122 pounds, 
is a student at Bringham Young University at 
Provo. Hope she’ll be Miss America. 


CIO bulwarks in the UFW. At the 
membership meetings Pres. Ralph 
Nuckols explained the campaign 
for CIO policy within the inters 
national and GEB Member Fred 
Stefan reported on the last board 
meeting. The resolution to sup- 
port Pizer was introduced by Re- 
cording Secy. Tony Scardaci. 

The local named Nuckols, Ste- 
fan and Vice Pres. Sylvio Ferro- 
giaro to membership on the Na- 
tional UFW Rank and File Com- 
mittee for CIO, which is headed 
by Thomas Binnall, Gardner, 
Mass. 

Delegates at Ionia were advised 
that locals representing more 
than 70% of the membership 
have already passed resolutions 
indorsing Pizer and the rank and • 
file committee and the position 
they are taking, and that the - 
figure probably will be 90% when 
the international convention is 
held in June. 

It also was announced that thus 
far every local in the union’s 
Midwestern Region which was 
acted on sticking with CIO has 
voted support for Pizer’s position, 
and that not one has indorsed 
the anti-CIO faction within the 
union. 

Speakers included Jack Hoch- 
stadt, of New York, secretary of 
the rank and file committee, and 
William Gilbert, of Chicago. Gil- 
bert, formerly Midwest director, 
was ousted by Organization Dir. 
Ernest Marsh, who is opposed to 
Pizer, but later was placed back 
on the staff by the Illinois and 
Wisconsin districts. District Pres. 
William Wieczorak presided. 

Hochstadt last month topped a 
pro-CIO slate of candidates which 
was swept into office /by a land- 
slide vote in Local 76, New York. 

CARE Packs For 
Israel Offered 

Leo Perils, director of CIO’s 
Community Services Committee, 
has urged local and International 
CIO unions to support the com- 
mittee’s drive for aid to Hista- 
drut, the General Federation of 
Jewish Labor in Israel, by pur- 
chase of special Passover CARE 
packages. 

“The enormous rate of immi- 
gration in recent months has ag- 
gravated Israel’s economic situa- 
tion and especially the plight of 
organized labor in the new state,” 
Perlis said. He pointed out that 
Histadrut recently had received 
1(X) CARE packages donated by 
CIO-CSC for needy Israel trade 
unionists. 

Like other CARE packages for 
Israel, the special Passover pack- 
age is priced at $10. Orders for 
the packages are now being re- 
ceived at CARE headquarters, 
20 Broad St., New York, N. Y., 
and through CIO unions through- 
out the country. 

CARE guarantees delivery of 
the package during the month of 
March, in time for the Passover 
holidays, beginning April 1. 

Lawrenson Is Upheld 
By NMU Members 

Rank and file members of the 
CIO Natl. Maritime Union have 
voted not to suspend Vice-Pres. 
Jack Lawrenson from office pend- 
ing a referendum vote by the 
general membership. 

The action was taken in New 
York and rejected a recommenda- 
tion of a 15-man trial board. Law- 
renson was charged with mis- 
feasance and malfeasance in con- 
nection with disorders last year 
at NMU headquarters. 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY IS, 1960 


N 


Steel Union Gives $500,000 To Needy Miners 


CIO Steelworkers have sent 
a gift of $500,000 “to assist 
needy miners and their fam- 
ilies in their struggle against 
the coal operators.” 

After conducting a telegraphic 
poll of the Steelworkers execu- 
tive board, USA-CIO Pres. Philip 
Murray sent the half-million dol- 
lar check to John Owens, secre- 
tary-treasurer of the United Mine 
Workers of America. 

At the same time Murray ap- 
pealed to all locals of the million- 
member steel workers union to 
send additional funds to help the 
coal miners. 

“The need is great. Your sup- 


port should be wholesome," Mur- 
ray told the steel membership. 

In his letter to UMW Sec.- 
Treas. Owens, Murray said: 

“I am requesting our aflfiiiated 
local unions to lend every degree 
of financial and moral support to 
the mine workers and their fam- 
ilies by making contributions 
which, I trust, will be helpful in 
bringing ultimate victory to 
the United Mine Workers of 
America." 

|N MID-JANUARY Murray had 
■ vigorously assailed action by 
NLRB General Counsel Robert 
Denham, who filed injunction 
proceedings against the mine 
union. 


At that time, the CIO president 
charged that “Denham is chal- 
lenging the legitimate rights and 
interests of all of organized labor. 

“I have instructed the general 
counsel of the CIO to lend, all 
possible assistance to the legal 
staff of the United Mine Workers 
in support of the basic labor prin- 
ciples involved and in opposition 
to the proceedings instituted by 
Denham.” 

The injunction was handed 
down Feb. 9. 

Since that time, two efforts to 
resume collective bargaining be- 
tween the operators and miners 
have ended in failure. A Taft- 
Hartley fact-finding board, oper- 
ating under that^ law’s “national 


emergency" provisions, has been 
appointed, and an 80-day injunc- 
tion may be sought this week. 

The union is seeking increases 
in wages, more substantial wel- 
fare fund contributions by em- 
ployers, and continuance of a 
number of provisions of the old 
contract. For several months a 
large proportion of the miners 
have been working a three-day 
work week or less. 

M urray, in his letter to the 
Steelworkers’ locals, empha- 
sized the “dire need of the mine 
workers and their families." 

“It is imperative, therefore, that 
our union and its members give 
to the United Mine Workers of 


America the fullest measure of 
support in their valiant struggle 
against these powerful interests," 
Murray wrote. 

“The war which is being waged 
against their union can be di- 
rected against your own and all 
other unions by the same com- 
binations of wealth when they 
deem it expedient to do so." 

Thus, the §teel union president 
went on, “it is of the utmost im- 
portance that you and our local 
unions give prompt considera- 
tion to this appeal." 

Under the steel union constitu- 
tion, such gifts are sent to the 
international headquarters and 
relayed to the beneficiary. 


Strikers Stand Firm in Face 
of Chrysler’s Ad Campaign 


Telephone Strike 
Deadline Postponed 


THE strike against the 
Chrysler Corp. entered its 
third week, 89,000 CIO Auto 
Workers stood firm in their 
campaign for a genuine, fool- 
proof, lasting and guaranteed 
pension plan. 

UAW and Chrysler officials have 
held two meetings with state and 
federal conciliators since the 
strike began with little or no 
progress reported. 

Special meetings of the UAW 
Chrysler negotiating committee 
and the Chrysler UAW Confer- 
ence were held last week to draft 
recommendations to the com- 
pany. 

(The contract between the union 
and the company would not ordinarily 
be open, except for economic provi- 
sions, until Aug. 1, 1950. However, 
a clause in the contract provides that 
the whole contract is automatically 
reopened if a strike occurs.) 

^ONTBACT proposals which 
^ the negotiating committed and 
the national conference will seek 
will cover such subjects as sen- 
iority, grievance procedure, union 
security and wage inequities. 

To meet strike needs, an assess- 
ment of $1 a week on all working 
members of the union, which had 
been voted by the UAW executive 
committee, w^s levied Feb. 9 and 
will continue for 12 weeks. 

And to hit at the strikers’ mo- 
rale, the Chrysler Corp. bought 
full-page newspaper advertise- 
ments which sought to convince 
not only the strikers but thd’ gen- 
eral public that the company’s 
pension offer is “as good as any.” 

“The Chrysler offer has been 
designed to look attractive in the 
front display windows," UAW 
Pres. Walter Reuther said, “but 
the jokers in the eligibility rules 
hidden in the back room would 
deny thousands of Chrysler work- 
ers with long years of continuous 
service any pension benefits. 

“Chrysler workers who need 
and are entitled to security in 
their old age know that the cor- 
poration’s pension offer is rigged 
with these jokers to deny them 
guaranteed pension benefits. 

“The 3-cent an hour, cut-rate 
Chrysler pension won't pay for 
the kind of sound pension pro- 
gram these workers need and de- 
serve." 

nEUTHER said that the union 
does not seek control of a 
“kitty" or pension fund, as the 
corporation has charged. He 
pointed out that company execu- 
tives know that it is absolutely 
impossible, under the union’s pro- 
posal, for UAW to “control" pen- 
sion funds. 

“The company is well aware;" 


Reuther said, “that the union did 
propose a joint board of arbitra- 
tion, upon which the union and 
the company would be equally 
represented together with a mu- 
tually agreed - upon impartial 
chairman to cast the deciding vote 
in case of a deadlock." 

Chrysler UAW Dir. Norman 
Matthews said the company 
charge of union control of a 
“kitty" is a deliberate smoke- 
screen to hide Chrysler’s real 

CIO Educators 

Union teachers from three CIO 
affiliates put their heads together 
last week on a project to improve 
workers’ education projects. 

They gqt together at Pawling, 
N. Y. — where Tom Dewey also 
maintains a farm — to talk over 
ways and means of making union 
school projects more interesting 
and valuable to the membership. 

Sponsoring the project was the 
CIO Dept, of Education and Re- 
search, in cooperation with the 


motives in forcing the strike upon 
its workers. 

“The simple facts," Matthews 
declared, “are that Chrysler is 
« not willing to give its workers the 
economic concessions which other 
corporations have granted through 
collective bargaining. The Chrys- 
ler company does not want to 
establish a pension program based 
upon an actuarially sound trust 
fund which alone can guarantee 
the payment of pension benefits." 

Study Programs 

education sections of the United 
Auto Workers, the Textile Work- 
ers and the Amalgamated Cloth- 
ing Workers. On hand were 
George Guernsey of the CIO Edu- 
cation Dept.; Larry Rogin, tex- 
tile; Robert Levin, clothing; Bren- 
dan Sexton, auto union; and about 
10 education staff people from 
xOach union. 

It was the first such get-to- 
gether of education staffs under 
CIO auspices. 


T he CIO Communications 
Workers' Executive Board, 
in response to an urgent re- 
quest by Federal Mediator Cy- 
rus S. Ching, last week post- 
poned for 16 days the threat- 
ened nationwide strike against 
the Bell Telephone System. 

CWA Pres. Joseph Beirne an- 
onunced the postponement 24 
hours before the union-set strike 
deadline “in accordance with 
Ching’s request for more time to 
bring about a peaceful settlement 
of the telephone wage dispute." 
The new deadline is Feb. 24 at 
6 a.m. in each tiifte zone. 

Beirne had accused the Bell Sys- 
tem of “trying to settle the tele- 
phone wage dispute in the news- 
papers with a batch of phony 
statistics based on small, selected 
groups of workers and through a 
personal smear campaign. 

“This technique is not conducive 
to good collective bargaining re- 
lations. It doesn’t help prevent 
strikes." 


After the strike postponement, 
Beirne said that the union trad 
asked the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission and 48 state 
regulatory bodies to investigate 
the wave on “anti-union advertis- 
ing" which has been placed in 
daily newspapers throughout the 
country. 

CWA also asked the rate-mak- 
ing bodies to rule on whether 
this advertising is a “properly 
allowable operating expense to be 
paid for by the phone-using 
public." 


Beirne said that the union was 
not requesting the commissions 
to decide the strike issue. “We 



Telephone Workers in “sunny" 
(no ‘ad’), southern California, 
employed by the Associated Tele- 
phone Co., voted overwhelmingly 
last week for CWA in an NLRB 
election. Results: CWA, 1916; 
IBEW, 694; no union, 299. 



are, though," he said, “asking 
that a ruling be made on whether 
advertising aimed specifically at 
prevention of wage improvement 
in the telephone industry is a 
properly allowable operating ex- 
pense to be paid for by the tele- 
phone-using public." 

“Telephone companies have ob- 
tained annual rate increases since 
the war totaling $348 million," he 
declared. “It is high time rate- 
making bodies call a halt to the 
Bell System’s campaign to jack 
up rates, while at the same time 
spending much of the money they 
get from the higher rates to put 
on high pressure anti-union ad- 
vertising campaigns." 

Beirne called on Bell manage- 
ment to “sit down at the bargain- 
ing table with the union and to 
do some real collective bargain- 
ing. If this is done, the issues 
can be settled by Feb. 24 and 
there will be no need for a strike." 

I N NEW YORK, CWA Div. 6 
Pres. Ernest Weaver, head of 
11,000 Western Electric installers, 
looked upon the delay as little 
more than an armed truce. 

“The effect of the postponement 
has been to make the company 
tougher and more smug in its at- 
titude," he said. “It is less will- 
ing than ever to get down to the 
issues involved." 

Weaver said he had “no doubts" 
but that the company would “take 
full advantage of the lull to 
propagandize employes in every 
way possible." He expressed skep- 
ticism about the possibility of ' the 
company accepting the findings 
of a fact-finding board, if , one 
were established. 



PEES. EENEST WEAVER of Div. 6, CIO 
Communications Workers, looks skeptically at 
a message from Federal Mediator Cyrus S. 
Ching asking postponement of the scheduled 
nation-wide Bell Telephone strike set for Feb. 
8. Weaver said he felt nothing could be gained 


by delaying the strike. Shown with him (1. to 
r.) are Thomas R. Steutel, Commissioner of the 
Federal Mediation Service; Vice Pres. M. W. 
Gray of CWA Div. 6; and Yolanda Dioguardi, 
secretary to CWA officials. The CWA board 
later postponed the strike until Feb. 24. 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 13, 1950 




Prejudice 


Is Like A Cancer 


It Gnaws At The Vitals Of Democracy And Often Causes Men To Make A Mockery Of Civil Liberties 


By ALLAN L. SWIM 

P erhaps it was only a minor inci- 
dent but it illustrated one of the 
nation's major problems — the problem 
of prejudice. 

A junior high school teacher in a Wash- 
ington, D. C., suburb told her class a group 
of students from New York City planned 
to visit their school. 

“They’d like to spend the night in our 
hofnes and get better acquainted with us,” 
she said. “Will all of you who can take 
care of a guest or two raise your hands?” 

Hands shot up all over the room. 

“I think I’d better tell you that some of 
the boys and girls who are going to visit 
us are Jewish,” she said. She called for 
a second showing of hands. 

A few hands shot into the air quickly. 
A few more were raised slowly. And a 
number of pupils who had raised their 
hands the first time refrained from doing 
80 the second time. 

This incident occurred only a few miles 
from the “citadel of democracy” — the halls 


of Congress — and just outside the borders 
of our capital — a city that practices race 
segregation. 

It occurred at the same time that a 
group of lawmakers were engaging in some 
fancy parliamentary footwork designed to 
keep Congress from even considering 
FEPC legislation. 

A nd it occurred during a period of 
history in which our nation finds itself 
greatly embarrassed every time it tries to 
sell the colored peoples of the world the 
idea that they should prefer our form of 
democracy to communism. 

Should we blame the teacher? Should we 
blame her parents? Should the students 
be blamed? 

Or should we blame it all on the type 
of teaching and behavior which over the 
years have planted the seeds of prejudice 
in too many minds? 

Fighting for civil rights legislation is 
one thing and fighting prejudice is some- 
thing else. 

They’re closely connected, it’s true — and 
if there was no race and religious prejudice 
in our land we wouldn’t need much of the 


legislation the “rights” advocates are 
pushing. 

. There would be no need for a FEPC, 
for example, if there was no such thing 
as job discrimination based on color and 
creed. 

Perhaps that’s merely pointing out the 
obvious. Maybe that’s like saying it would 
be hot if it wasn’t cold. 

But it’s something that should be said 
again and again — and it’s something that 
should be given close attention by those 
who abhor discrimination. 

Legislation obviously could remedy some 
of the abuses — ^but more than legislation 
is needed. 

( FORMED a violent dislike for the Chi- 
nese people about the time I started to 
school, although I had never talked with 
an Oriental. 

it took me years to overcome the feeling 
— and it didn’t disappear entirely until I 
became fairly well acquainted with a Chi- 
nese merchant. 

My prejudice was entirely without foun- 
dation — as most of them are. It made no 
sense whatsoever. It was based on misin- 


formation — or on a lack of information. 

And nobody — in school, church or else- 
where: — took the trouble to tell me as A 
youngster that I shouldn’t be prejudiced 
against the Chinese. 

I don’t recall having heard any of my 
teachers discuss tolerance or discrimina- 
tion. Race relations was a taboo subject 
in my school. The Negro children of my 
town attended classes on “the other side 
of the tracks.” 

T hose of us who profess to believe in 
democracy can do much — if we only 
will — to fight prejudice and the unhealthy 
social conditions which result from it. . 

It’s a fight that can be waged nearly 
anywhere — in our apartment houses, in our 
neighborhoods, in our clubs, our unions, 
our churches and our schools. 

The first step to be taken, of course, is 
to rid our own minds of prejudice and 
then to go to work on our families and 
friends. 

Why not give it a trial? 

After aH, prejudice is a cancer which 
eats at the vitals of democracy. 


GOPpledegook! 

Not long ago the Republicans were sending up trial bal- 
loons which indicated the GOP battle-cry for 1950 might be 
‘"Down With the Welfare State." 

At that time the GOPsters were making fiery speeches in 
opposition to something they called “statism.” 

Party big-wigs, however, got together in Washington last 
week and came up with a new slogan — '‘Liberty Against So- 
cialism." 

That obviously will be their campaign theme this year. 

• c. 

The implication, of course, is that the GOP is at least 100% 
for liberty and that the Truman Administration stands for some- 
thing bad — something called socialism. 

As part of its “liberty" program the GOP advocates — 

“A continuation of the Taft-Hartley Law because it has 
restored equality between employer and employes. ..." 

The Republicans' new “platform" states that “the major 
domestic issue today is liberty against socialism. . . ." 

It says that “basic American principles are threatened by 
the Administration's program for a planned economy modeled 
on the Socialist governments of Europe. ...” 

Maybe some of the stuff the GOP is trying to peddle in its 
•‘platform" would sound good if you didn't know what it meant. 

Here's what it means: 

The Republicans are opposed to the Fair Deal program 
which the CIO favors. It wants to have nothing to do with fed- 
eral health insurance, rent control, the Brannan farm plan or 
developments like TVA. 

“Gobbledegook" is a term used around Washington to de- 
scribe the using of many conflicting words instead of a few 
simple ones. Give the term a slight twist and you have “GOPple- 
degook," which aptly describes the new GOP “platform." 

OiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniHiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiitiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHitiiniiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiniiiininnHiiiiiiiiMiii 



Congress of Industrial Organizations 


Philip Murray, Presidenf James B. Carey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vice Presidents: Joseph A. Beirne, L. S. Buckmaster, Joseph Curran. 
John Green, Allan S. Haywood, O. A. Knight, Walter P. 
Reuther, Emil Rieve, prank Rosenblum. 

Allan L Swim, Editor and Publicity Director 

Assistant Publicity Director: Henry C. Fleisher 
Assistant Editors: Holiace Ransdell, Fred Ross, Arthur Riordan, (On Leave), 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark, William Weiss, Gervase N. Love 

Editorial Office, 718 Jackson Place, N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Entered as Second Class Matter, Post Office, Washington, 0. C* 

Under the Act of Aug. 24. 1912 and Feb 28. 1925. 

[yol. XIII February 13, 1950 ^ No. 7 

A THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 13, 1950 


V. S. Seeks Facts On Women's Night Work 


pO WOMEN work at night 
because they like to or be- 
cause they have to do it? 

Is it good for them? How many 
women are at wprk while the rest 
of us sleep? Is some legislative 
control needed, and, if so, what 
standards should be set? How es- 
sential is night work? 

These are some of the questions 
considered in a new pamphlet on 
“Night Work for Women in Ho- 
tels and Restaurants,” just issued 
by the Women’s Bureau, U. S. 
Dept, of Labor. The study is 
based on an exploratory survey 
of night employment of women 
in these industries in three states 
— Connecticut, Georgia and In- 
diana. 

The findings tend to illustrate 


the complexity of the problems 
encountered in a consideration of 
night work rather than to provide 
conclusive answers. 

Restaurants and hotels were se- 
lected for the study because that 
is where some night work is a 
more or less permanent feature, 
and because they employ impor- 
tant numbers of women. Pressures 
to repeal or modify restrictions on 
night employment of women in 
restaurants have in recent years 
focused concern on this industry 
in particular. 

O NE OF THE important factors 
noted in the findings is that 
long hours and night work are 
linked together in both the hotel 
and restaurant industries. Many 
of the women studied were work- 


ing longer than 48 hours a week. 
A large majoi;‘ity of the hotel 
workers interviewed were found 
to be working six shifts a week. 
In one area, nearly a fourth of 
the women employed at night 
worked seven shifts. 

Sound public policy with regard 
to night employment of women, 
the report indicates, must rest 
upon fuller understanding of 
present basic employment prob- 
lems. A broad approach to the 
problem must include considera- 
tion both of appropriate legisla- 
tion and of policies that lie out- 
side the realm of legislation. 

The development of better com- 
munity services for the conveni- 
ence of women, for example, 
would give them greater freedom 
to accept daytime employment. 


Management Action Kills Safety Code Group 


M anagement action has 

forced the Ohio Industrial 
Commission to dissolve the advi- 
sory committee on revision of fac- 
tory safety codes, 
if Now the commission will take 
upon itself the task, as required 
by law. 

Substitute Bills 
Like Health Plan 

D espite repeated claims that 
the national health insurance 
bill is “dead,” its opponents con- 
tinue to introduce substitutes. 
And each substitute is more like 
national health insurance than its 
predecessor. 

That’s the observation of Com- 
mittee for the Nation’s Health. 

During the first few weeks of 
the current Congressional session, 
“more substitute proposals for the 
national health insurance bill 
have been made than during all 
of the* last four years,” CNH re- 
ports. 

“All of these 1950 bills — or pro- 
posed bills — are health programs 
which (1) do not depend on the 
charity principle; (2) are national 
health bills, some with large fed- 
eral powers; (3) are intended to 
cover a large proportion of the 
population, and (4) include mem- 
bers of both political parties 
among their sponsors. 

“Thus the record shows,” CNH 
concludes, “that despite the 
AMA’s huge campaign of nega- 
tion,” the legislators recognize the 
need of a centralized program. 


For the past three years, a gen- 
eral advisory committee contain- 
ing an equal number of labor and 
management representatives, has 
been discussing safety code revi- 
sion. Most of the work has been 
done by a technical subcommit- 
tee, which periodically reported 
to the full group. 

Management spokesmen repeat- 
edly refused labor’s request that 
technical experts assist the , com- 
mittee. Management recently re- 
fused to allow Roland P. Blake, 
principal safety engineer of the 


U. S. Bureau of Standards, to ad- 
vise the committee. This created 
the impasse. 

Secy.-Treas. Jacob dayman of 
the Ohio CIO Council said: “This 
is crystal-clear proof that man- 
agement representatives never 
had any intention of writing 
honest safety codes that would 
adequately protect the workers.*' 

CIO representatives on the ad- 
visory committee have been day- 
man; Robert Cousino, Auto Work- 
ers; Chester Hosmer, Steelwork- 
ers; and John Kumpel, Rubber 
Workers. 



“There goes Mr. 



They ‘Settled 
Down’ To 
‘Regular’ Living 

I T’S OFTEN said that the ‘‘unsung 
heroes” of the union movement are 
the wives of the organizers. 

And it's also often said that a veteran 
organizer is like an old fire horse who 
can’t remain in his stall when there's a 
blaze around. 

Throughout the-nation there is a number 
of women who'll agree heartily about both 
these points. 

This is a story about one of them — and 
her family. 


^HE HUSBAND is an old campaigner 
■ who has worked in more cities than he 
can recall offhand. 


He started organizing back in the days 
when “union skates” had to be physically 
tough to survive.' 

He moved around from one spot to an- 
other, frequently on no more than an 
hour’s notice. Sometimes his wife moved 
with him. Sometimes she joined him a 
day or so later. 

When the war began, the husband was 
working for a union that expanded rapidly 
under the impetus of increased armaments 
production. 

The organizer stepped up his activities 
accordingly. Sometimes he was so busy he 
hardly knew whether he was coming or 
going. 

He would be in New England one day 
and in the South the next. He got home 
when he could, which was seldom. 


^FTER THE WAR ended, the organizer 
and his wife decided they were tired 
of living almost like Gypsies and that 
they should settle down. 


Eventually he found the type of job he 
wanted — a good, steady job with regular 
hours and no traveling. 


He would still be connected — indirectly 
— ^with the union movement but there 
would be no more of this business of 
handing out leaflets when the midnight 
shift changed. 

No longer would he have to worry about 
getting cracked on the head by employer 
goons. 

Ah, he was going to live like a man 
should — at home with his family. He felt 
good just to think about it. 

^FHE ORGANIZER soon became an ex- 
■ organizer and moved to a city which 
wasn’t famous for its hustle and bustle. 

He bought a home — a nice, comfortable 
place not far from some of his wife’s 
relatives. 

At this point he was telling himself he 
had been a sap for years — running around 
the country like a madman, working his 
heart out for people who seemed never to 
fully appreciate the value of unions. 

He was congratulating himself on his 
wise decision to lead a “normal” life. 

And his wife felt that at last they were 
going to be “citizens” — people who became 
part of a community — people with roots. 

T Bffi EX-ORGANIZER and his wife moved 
into their new home and settled back 
to enjoy their new life. 

Two nights later their telephone rang. 
The late Van A. Bittner, who had just 
been named director of the CIO Organiz- 
ing Committee, Was on the wire. 

‘^Say,” said Bittner, “we’re just launch- 
ing our Southern drive and I’ve got an 
important assignment for you. When can 
you report for work?” ^ 

Within a couple of days the new house 
had been sold — 'at a loss — and the ex- 
organizer was an organizer again. 

And his wife was seated beside him in 
their car as they sped toward Dixie. 

That was in the summer of 1946. The 
organizer is still on the job. 


And he still threatens occasionally to 
lead a “normal” life. A. E. S. 


H I / BOMB 



Miss. Publisher Says CIO Helps Business Community 


Conservative 
Or Liberal? 


IIODDING CARTER, Greenville, Miss., 
■■ publisher and nationally known au- 
thor, is one Dixie newspaperman who 
thinks the CIO’s Southern organizing 
campaign has been a good thing. 

He expressed his opinion of “Operation 
Dixie” in an interview recently at Greens- 
boro, N. C., where he went for an address 
at the Women’s College of the Univ. of 
North Carolina. 

Carter told a simple story to illustrate 
the economic implications of unionism. 

“As a publisher,” he said, “I have to 
keep informed on advertising expenditures 
and other business barometers, particu- 
larly in cities in my region of a size 
comparable with my own town of Green- 
ville.” (Greenville has a population of 
about 35,000.) 

C ARTER said he had particularly 
watched Laurel, Miss., also in the 
35,000 class, which four years ago had no 
labor organization but which today has 
6500 CIO members. CIO union contracts 
have added more than $5 million to Lau- 
rel’s annual payrolls. 

“There is much more business activity 
in Laurel than in other cities of the same 
size in my area,” Carter declared. “And 
particularly, I know there is more news- 
paper advertising carried in the local 
paper in Laurel than in these other cities.” 

Carter said he wished more labor union 
members would run for, and be supported 
for, public office, particularly on the state 
and local levels. “We need them,” he said, 
“for a true representation by a cross- 
section of the community.” 

A foe of Federal fair employment prac- 
tices legislation. Carter said democratic 
trade unionism, as practiced by the CIO, 


One of his friends once described Hod- 
ding Carter as “a man many people swear 
by — and a lot of people swear at.” His 
implication was that those who knew 
Carter or knew about him weren’t neutral 
in their judgment of him. 

Carter is known in his own State as a 
liberal — and sometimes as a radical. In 
other sections he’s often referred to 
as a conservative with a trend toward 
liberalism. 

Advocates of stronger civil rights 
usually are sharply critical of his argu- 
ment that the South must work out its 
own race problems without resort to new 
laws and without help or interference 
from other sections of the country. 


without discrimination because of race, 
creed or color, is accomplishing more 
toward abolishing segregation than can 
ever be gained by law. 

Carter urged trade unionists to^ improve 
their advertising and public relations tech- 
niques and facilities. “Big business is get- 
ting its story before the public,” he de- 
clared, “but labor, handicapped by lack of 
money for advertising, is not. 

“What labor lacks and needs is large 
and powerful organs of public Oipinion.” 

I N HIS public address Carter ridiculed 
States Righters’ cries of “Federal inter- 
vention.” 

“It was all right with the people in 
Mississippi 'for the federal government to 
‘intervene’ with levees to prevent floods,” 
he said. “Federal interference by estab- 

N' 


fishing crop controls brought no protest.” 

He voiced approval of federal aid to 
education and called for further adjust- 
ment of freight rates to aid the South. 

“A Marshall Plan for the South might 
be a good idea,” he said, pointing out that 
the region “stands at the bottom of the 
list” in material things such as schools, 
industry and per capita income. 

^»ARTER PRAISED recent Southern 
progress in improvement of farming 
methods, diversification of crops and the 
turning of wornout cotton lands into grain 
fields and pastures. 

He noted a rapid increase in Negro 
registration and voting, prompted in part 
by outside pressure, and said they gen- 
erally voted for men and measures that 
best benefited the public generally. “Civil 
rights legislation as a whole,” he said, 
“can’t help and won’t hurt the region.” 

Carter praised Gov. Kerr Scott and Sen, 
Frank Graham as public office holders. 
He did not mention the State's other na- 
tional legislators. 

Virginia lUC Head 
At Church Parley 

The Methodist Church has appointed 
the Rev. Charles C. Webber, president of 
the Virginia State Industrial Union Coun- 
cil, as a delegate to the National Study 
Conference on the Church and Economic 
Life to be held Feb. 16-19 in Detroit. 

The conference is sponsored by the Fed- 
eral Council of the Churches of Christ in 
America. Delegates representing more 
than 30 States and 28 Protestant and East- 
ern Orthodox denominations will study a 
new Christian approach to economic prob- 
lems. 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 13, 1950 


5 


Age Insurance Covers Too Few— And Inadequately 


D. ROCKWELL CLARK 

Y OU WORK all your life in 
a '‘covered’' job, and you 
and your employer each pay 
the Federal government a tax 
of 1^2% on the first $3000 of 
your yearly earnings. 

You retire at 65, and receive 
a monthly tax-free pension check 
from the government, financed by 
the special taxes you and your 
employer have paid all those 
years. You also get a small check 
for each dependent. 

This method was set up 12 
years ago. Its full and formal 
name is the Old Age and Survi- 
vors’ Insurance System, and it is 
a major part of' the Social Se- 
curity law. 

It’s full of holes. Congress is 
slowly getting around to patch- 
ing some of them. 

T he fixed monthly payments 
to pensioners have been get- 
ting punier every year in rela- 
tion to the cost of living. 

It doesn’t cover enough people, 
inadequate as it is, and the “cov- 
ered” people aren’t protected in 
Cfiough ways. 

L ast year, spurred by CIO’s 
big drive for pensions paid 
by private employers, the House 
finally passed a new Social Se- 
curity bill (HR 6000), upping ben- 
efits by an average of 70% and 
covering 11 million more workers. 

The Senate didn’t act. Now the 
conservative Senate Finance Com- 
mittee is holding hearings to de- 
cide whether it wants to approve 
the House bill and report it out 
to the 'Senate floor for action. 

CIO witnesses will go before 
the committee Feb. 27 to give 
their reaction to HR 6000. 

In a nutshell, they’ll say HR 
6(XX) is good as fqr* as it goes, 
but they think it should go 
farther. 

The chart above gives the story, 
as far as it can be reduced to 
«uch a simple form. 

There are two important angles 
Which cannot be shown on a 
chart. One is the definition of 
^'average wage” and the other is 
what is meant by “fully insured.” 

Under the present law, your 
"average” wage is simply a math- 
ematical average. Your total earn- 
ings in “covered” employment are 
divided by the number of months 
between the time you first went 
to work and the time you 
reached 65. 

This means that if you are 
totally or temporarily disabled or 
unable to find a job in “covered” 
employment, your future insur- 
ance benefits drop. Also, your low 
earnings when you were learning 
your job are a drag against your 
later, higher income. 

IINDER HR 6000, periods of 
^ total disability would not drag 
your average down. 

The CIO says the “average” 
should simply, be an average of 
what you made during your “best 
five consecutive years” in “cov- 
ered” employment. 

Suppose that you are now 65. 
In the past 20 years you have 
worked in a “covered” job for 
15 years and been totally disabled 
for- five years. You started out 
earning $100 a month but for the 
last 10 years you worked you 
made $400 each month. 

Under the present law, your 
"average ' wage” would be about 
$150 a month. Under HR 60(X), 
your “average” would be about 
$233. Under the CIO proposal 
your “average” would be $400. 
pnder all three proposals, the 
benefits paid are based on the 
"average wage.” 

(Adoption of the CIO method ol 
^goring the average would consid- 


WHEN YOU STOP WORKING 

Here is what your Social Security tax would bring you under present law, under HR 6000 y and 
if CIO’s proposals were adopted. The figures assume you are a ''fully insured” worker and have 
been paying Social Security tax for 20 years. 


“Average 

wage 

AT 

Single 

65 

Married : 

wife 

UNDER 

65* 

Married : 
wife 
OVER 
65 

If you’re 
permanently 
disabled 

BEFORE 65 

If you’re 
temporarily 
disabled 

If you’re 
unemployed 

$100 mo. 

Now: $3C 

Now : $30 

Now: $45 

Now : 

Now: 

Present benefits de- 


HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

NOTHING 

NOTHING. 

pend on state laws: 


$55 

$55 

$80 



average $21 a week 


CIO; $60 

CIO: $80 

CIO: $80 



for not more than 22 

$150 mo. 

Now: $3£ 

Now: $36 

Now : $54 



weeks. 


HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 





$60.50 

$60.50 

$90.75 

HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

HR 6000 proposes no 


CIO : $72 

CIO:$126 

CIO: $108 

Same as “old age” in- 

NOTHING. 

change in this. 





surance, for head of 



$200 mo. 

Now: $4i 

Now : $42 

Now: $63 

family; NOTHING for 




HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

dependents. 




$66 

$66 

$99 





CIO: $84 

CIO:$126 

CIO: $126 

CIO: 

CIO: 

CIO wants a national 





Same as “old age” in- 

National system, with 

system with improved 

$250 mo. 

Now: $48 

Now: $48 

Now: $72 

surance, includ i n g 

weekly benefits rang- 

benefits. 


HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

payment for depend- 

ing from 50% of earn- 



$71.50 

$71.50 

$107.25 

ents. 

ings for single work- 


/ 

CIO: $96 

CIO: $144 

CIO: $144 


er, up to 70% for 3 or 







more dependents: 


$3(X) mo. 

Now: $48 

Now: $48 

Now: $72 


maximum of $45 a 



HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 


week. 



$77 

$77 

$115,50 





CIO:$108 

CIO: $162 

CIO: $162 




$400 mo. 

Now: $48 

Now: $48 

Now: $72 





HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 

HR 6000: 





$77 

$77 

$115.50 





CIO:$132 

CIO: $198 

CIO: $198 





EXTRA EARNINGS; NoWy you forfeit the EN- 
TIRE payment if you earn more than a 

month in covered employment after 65. HR 6000 
allows extra earnings of $50 a month and for 
sums above $50 makes only a prorata deduction. 
CIO agrees, so does Administration. 


*Under the present law and HR .6000, the wife 
must he 65 before she can draw dependent bene- 
fits; CIO says this should be dropped to 60, and 
that women insured in their own right also 
should start collecting benefits aF60. Administra- 
tion witnesses also favor this change. 


erably increase benefits paid, even 
under present law.) 

T he matter of what is meant 
by “fully insured” is vastly 
complicated. At present, to be 
“fully insured” so that you know 
you will get your Social Security 
payments at 65 even if you quit 
work tomorrow for good, you have 
to have worked approximately 10 
years steadily, in a “covered” job. 

If you shift around, as most 
people do, your total working 
time in “covered” jobs has to add 
up to about 10 years. 

(If you work any time at all during 
any given three-month period you 
are “covered” for that three months, 
however, so that you actually could 
receive only four pay-checks a year 
and still keep your good standing 
with Social Security, so to speak.) 
HR 6000 and CIO would both 


liberalize this provision; but in 
making it easier for everyone to 
get “fully insured” the system 
must operate so that the “late 
comers” — i. e., the people newly 
covered by proposed changes in 
the law — get their fair share of 
benefits, no more and no less. 
A good many millions of persons 
now nearing 65 would be brought 
under the law for the first time 
if HR 6060 passed, and even more 
would come in if Congress adopted 
the CIO proposal. 

Many people now “fully in- 
sured,” and millions of the newly 
insured, would be entitled to fan- 
tastically small benefits under the 
present law if it did not contain 
a provision stating that the least 
any fully insured beneficiary 
would receive is $10 a month. 


HR 6000 raises this minimum to 
$25, and the CIO would up it 
to $50. 

The present law also sets a 
maximum family benefit of $85 
a month, or 80% of the worker’s 
“average” wage, or twice his pri- 
mary benefit, whichever is LOW- 
ER. This is all the entire family 
can receive from Social Security 
no matter how many dependents 
are involved. 

HR 6000 would raise this family 
maximum to $150 a month or 80% 
of the “average” wage, whichever 
is lower. The CIO plan would set 
it at 80% of the “average wage,” 
with no dollar ceiling. 

T he “SURVIVORS” feature of 
the present law also needs 
improvement. The law provides 
that widows and dependent chil- 


Retired Textile Worker Loves Beef 
But Hasn^t Eaten Any For A Year 


^^ONGRESS has been talking about improving 
the Social Security law for just about a year, 

now. 

Last March, a former member of the CIO 
Textile workers told the House Ways and Means 
Committee just how he was making out on Social 
Security insurance. 

“Every time we would get a dollar ahead, some- 
thing would happen to take it,” said 73-year-old 
George F. Lewey of Danville, Va., explaining to 
the committee how it was he had not been able to 
put anything by. He and his wife were living on 
$52.09 Social Security a month, with the rest of 
a $1900 hospital bill to pay, and an annual tax bill 
of $150 on their small frame house. 

“And,” Lewey continued, “we have to take care 
of my wife’s 90-year-old mother. We cannot keep 
her at home because her mind comes and goes. 
But we clothe her, we send her a lot of stuff and 
take her a lot of stuff and she has to have some- 
body over her all the time.” 


HAVE the Leweys done since last March, 
while Congress fiddled? 

He spends most of his time at home, “keeping 
things straight.” The Leweys have retreated into 
small quarters in order to house four roomers who 
together bring in $13.80 a week, (Taking in 
roomers is OK under the present law because it is 
not “covered employment” — the Leweys can do this 
and still keep their $52.09.) The elderly mother 
is still alive, and fortunately all three are in good 
health “because if we got sick, we’d have to borrow.” 

Lewey says he has to skimp on many things — 
“principally eats” — to keep his family together. He 
has looked for a job that would pay enough to make 
it worthwhile, but hasn’t been able to find anything. 

“I’d do anything, too,” he says. “The only money 
that goes into the bank is to prepare for the tex 
bill. Then it comes out. If we run into any crisis 
whatsoever I’ll have to cash in my one remaining 
little insurance policy — and you don’t get anything 
that way.” 

Lewey loves the taste of beef but hasn’t eaten 
any in over a year. v 


dren of fully insured worker* 
receive a certain proportion of 
the benefits that would have been 
paid to the husband and father if 
he had lived to be 65. HR 6000 
and CIO would liberalize these 
payments in two ways, by chang- 
ing the proportion paid and by 
raising the primary benefits. 

Now, the widow of a worker 
who had been in “covered” jobs 
for 20 years and had “averaged” 
$300 a month receives $36 a month 
plus $24 for the first child. She 
cannot get the full $24 for the* 
second child, however, if she has 
two, because she runs into the 
$85 ceiling. 

Under HR 6000 she would re- 
ceive $57.75 a month plus $57.75 
for the first child and $38.50 each 
for others, up to the $150 ceiling. 
Under the CIO proposal she 
would get $81.00 a month plus 
$81.00 for the first child plus addi- 
tional amounts for the other chil- 
dren, up to a maximum of $240 a 
month. 

(And of course the “average” wage 
might be higher under HR 6000 and 
almost certainly would be under the 
CIO proposal, because of CIO’s 
“best-five-years” method of calcula- 
tion.) 

S EPARATE from the “Social Se- 
curity” system but considered 
in the same bill is the question 
of direct relief to the aged. The 
Social Security benefits are 
earned; the relief program is 
jointly financed by the states and 
the federal treasury and the mon- 
ey, such as it is, goes to the most 
needy whether they have worked 
in covered jobs or not. 

The Federal government puts 
up part of this money and the 
states the rest. At present, relief 
checks for the aged average $42 
a month compared with an aver- 
age of $25 for Social Security 
benefits; the Social Security pay- 
ments are so low that 10% of 
those who receive them are also 
on direct relief. 

CIO is interested in taking peo- 
ple off the relief rolls and hence 
is concentrating its efforts on bet- 
tering the Social Security system 
and broadening its coverage. 

CIO is also pulling for a Uni- 
form system of unemployment 
compensation, managed the same 
way in each state, with a schedule 
of minimum benefits. 

T he CIO technicians in the field 
of Social Security met Feb. 3 to 
work out details for submission 
to the full Social Security Com- 
mittee, which was scheduled to 
meet Feb. 13. Originally, CIO wit- 
nesses were to appear Feb. 16 
and 17 before the Senate group, 
but their appearance has been 
postponed. 

Members of the technicians’ • 
group are: Mrs. Katherine Ellick- 
son, CIO Research Dept.; Paul 
Sifton, a Washington representa- 
tive for the CIO Auto Workers; 
Harry Becker, Director of So- 
cial Security Dept., UAW-CIO; 
/ohn Edelman, Washington rep- 
resentative for the Textile Work- 
ers; Kenneth Kramer, TWUA Di- 
rector of Insurance and Health, 
and Sylvia Gottlieb, Communica- 
tions Workers. 

TWUA Pres. Emil Rieve is chair- 
man of the CIO Social Security 
Committee and will present the 
CIO case on Capitol Hill. 

Other committee members are: 
Secy.-Treas. David J. McDonald 
of the Steelworkers; Secy.-Treas. 
Emil Mazey of the Auto Workers; 
Vice Pres. Joseph Childs of the 
Rubber Workers; Pres. Irving 
Simon of Retail, Wholesale; Vice 
Pres. John Yancey of Transport 
Service; CWA Pres. Joseph Beirne, 
and Secy.-Treas. Jacob dayman 
of the Ohio CIO CoiinciL 




XBTE CIO K£WS, FEBRUARY 13, 1950 



Clamor For Denham ’s Removal Becomes Roar 


By GER VASE N. LOVE 

I T CAN’T be very nice to be 
Robert N. Denham these 
days. 

On the surface, things don’t 
look bad at all. But the office 
(complete with shower) that 
the general counsel of the Na- 
tional Labor Relations Board 
occupies in Washington isn’t 
the entire United States. 

Solidly built as the office is, it 
can’t keep out the rising chorus 
from the guys back home that 
Pres. Truman find someone else 
for Denham’s job. 

That’s Penham’s position. It’s 
nothing new. The clamor started 
months ago — last summer, in 
fact. It has been intensified in 
the last few weeks because of his 
speeches, such as that calling on 
employers in a New York address 
to haul the NLRB into court 
whenever they don’t like one of 
its decisions. Denham is sup- 
posed to defend the NLRB v^ffien 
its rulings are attacked. 

O NE OF THE earliest cries 
came from the Communica- 
tions Workers of America, then a 
brand new member of the CIO 
family. At their convention last 
summer the delegates called upon 
Pres. Truman to remove Denham 
from office “because of his inabil- 
ity to remain impartial and an 
obvious leaning toward manage- 
ment in his decisions.” 

CWA Pres. Joseph Beirne re- 
newed that request a month ago 
after Denham’s New York speech. 

“A man who openly espouses 
the cause of management in la- 
bor disputes,” said Beirne, “does 
not belong in a position like Den- 
ham’s.” 

The Oil Workers likewise were 
pioneers in the demand for Den- 
ham’s ouster, and they’re still 
demanding that some one who 
will give labor an even break — it 
wants nothing more — be named 
to succeed him. 

Last August Pres. O. A. Knight 
of the Oil Workers called upon 
the President to fire Denham 
after the latter had refused to 
schedule hearings before the 
NLRB in the cases of 300 OWUI 
members fired by California oil 
companies. 

In October an NLRB trial ex- 
aminer set a pattern when he 


1-Break-Strikes Denham 


IJOBERT N. DENHAM, NLRB general counsel, 
not only breaks strikes but goes about the 
country bragging about it. 

In a speech in Los Angeles on Feb. 6 he claimed 
credit for himself and the Taft-Hartley Act for 
forcing members of the Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers Union to end their walkout at three Carls- 
bad, N. M., potash mines and go back to work 
without attaining their goals. 

He expressed much pleasure over the fact that 
the farmers will now get their fertilizer, which 
contains potash. He expressed no concern at all 
over the fact that the strikes were forced to return 
to their jobs at outmoded pay rates. 

TPHE STRIKE started Nov. 19, 1949, when the 
■ operators of the i>otash mines refused a wage 
increase. The mines were shut down and pickets 
kept them shut. 

“The matter went on and eventually came to 
our attention,” Denham boasted. “About three 
weeks ago we obtained an injunction to prevent 
mass picketing or other interference with any of 
those persons who desired to go to work (main- 
tenance men), or otherwise do business with the 
company. 

“At first there wasn’t a great rush to go back 
on the job, because the production workers were 
the strikers, but maintenance men returned imme- 
diately, and within 10 days or so production had 
been resumed, with potash coming out at about 
50% of the normal rate. 

“Many of the strikers had returned, and after 
the injunction had been in effect two weeks, the 
company advised the. union and the strikers that a 
certain date would be the time when other persons 
would be hired to replace the striking production 
men. I was advised just before I left Washington 
that during that day the striking union had offered 
to return to work en masse if the company would 
just stop hiring replacements and would put those 
men who had been replaced on a preferential 
fehiring list. 






/ 


Cof^- 


II 


pY NOW, I take it, the mines are in full pro- 
duction. The injunction’s efficacy was excellent. 
Potash is again being produced, and the farmers, 
solely because of the Taft-Hartley Act and its in- 
junction provisions, stand a reasonable chance of 
getting their supplies of fertilizer again this year. 
Had there been no Taft-Hartley Act, and had the 
Wagner Act continued on the books as it was, the 
mines would still be closed unless, of course, the 
operators had surrendered to the union and met their 
demands.” 

Denham described the Taft-Hartley Act as “basic- 
ally, the biggest step forward this nation has ever 
made in doing something to insure stability of labor 
relations.” 

ANYTHING DEAD, LIKE A SLAIN 
UNION, IS BOUND TO BE STABLE. 


recommended that 40 of the work- 
ers be reinstated by the Standard 
Oil Co. of California. Denham 
belatedly went into action and in- 
formed the union that he had 
ordered California regional direc- 
tors to issue charges of unfair 
labor practices in cases involving 
253 additional men. 

In December, Knight pleaded 
with Pres. Truman to appoint a 
special general counsel to han- 
dle another case involving the 
discharge of about 800 OWUI 
members by the Union Oil Co. of 
California after a strike. Den- 
ham had refused to act. 


I^ORE recently tl?e Inti. Oil 
Worker, official newspaper 
of the union, branded him “dicta- 
tor of the NLRB” and declared 
he had again proved himself 
“biased, prejudiced and unfit to 
hold American public office.” 

His oath of office, the paper 
pointed out in an editorial, re- 
quires him to administer the law 
impartially, “but apparently Den- 
ham is attempting to convince the 
world that he hates labor unions.” 
It cited another speech in which 
he attacked the AFL Teamslers 
Union and hinted it was a dan- 
gerous organization because of 
the power it could wield. 


“It is hot his duty to make 
speeches about the POSSIBLE 
offenses the Teamsters MIGHT 
commit,” said the editorial. “But 
that seems to be Denham’s way 
of doing things— finding all un- 
ions guilty before ever giving 
them a trial . Find ’em guilty 
before they even do anything. 

“As long as he holds office, I>en- 
ham will be a shameful blotch on 
the proud American flag.” 

In an editorial in Advance, the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers 
laid out Denham for his appeal 
to employers to take NLRB de- 
cisions against them to the courts. 
It said in part: 


PAC Backs Roosevelt, Mrs. Helen Douglas 


By WILLIAM MILLIS 
■ ■P OR VICTORY in ’50, it’s 
■ Helen Gahagan Douglas 
and James Roosevelt for 
CIO-PAC!” 

Such was the major decision 
last week of the California Natl. 
CIO-PAC. 

Meeting for two days in San 
Francisco, executive board and 
central committee members of the 
State PAC hammered out a, pro- 
gram on trade union economic 
and political action issues to guide 
the state’s 200,0(X) CIO members 
in the present interim period 
until a new California CIO Coun- 
cil is organized. 

IJEBE IS A digest of major 
■■ PAC decisions: 

Full and unqualified indorse- 
ment of Mrs. Douglas for U. S. 
senator, because she provides the 
leadership necessary “to subdue 
and defeat the forces of reaction 
from both the extreme right and 
the extreme left.” 

Hearty support of James Roose- 
velt for governor on “his program 
of jobs and employmentj housing, 


public health*, civil rights, use of 
water resources and other major 
issues.” 

Indorsement of State Sen. 
George Miller, Jr. (D., Contra 
Costa) for lieutenant governor, 
and backing of eight candidates 
for Congress. 

A call for all-out backing of 
the CIO Communications Work- 
etrs, who face a possible national 
strike against the Bell System. 

An appeal to all CIO locals for 
prompt and effective support of 


Four Hours To Vote, 
All Paid By Boss 

CIO Textile Workers’ local 
1064, in Allentown, Pa., has put 
political action into a contract. 

TWUA’s new agreement with 
the International Felt Co. pro- 
vides (a) a four-hour paid holi- 
day for registration purposes and 
(b) a four-hour paid holiday on 
Election Day. The company has 
the option of staggering employ- 
ment or closing the mill on these 
two days. 


United Auto Workers Locals 230 
and 844, now on strike against 
Chrysler Corp. 

Support of Fair Deal “must” 
legislation, including Taft-Hart- 
ley repeal, in the 81st Congress. 

Full backing to the Packing- 
house Workers of America in the 
“Don’t Buy Wilson” campaign. 

AN APPEAL for effective fund 
raising, both through volun- 
tary “PAC Dollar” drives for fed- 
eral candidates and local union 
contributions for state and county 
candidates, to finance the fast- 
developing primary election 
campaign. 

Condemnation of Gov. Warren’s 
policy on unemployment, and or- 
ganization of a statewide petition 
drive to force the jobless issue 
before the Legislature in March. 

Condemnation of any U. S. 
moves to assist Franco Spain, and 
a request to National CIO — in 
line with decisions of the last 
CIO convention denouncing the 
totalitarian Madrid regime — to de- 
mand ^thht the State Dept, main- 
tain Tt:^ “hands off” diplomatic 
policy toward Franco’s fascist 
regime and continue to support 


Nations boycott of 


the United 
Franco. 

PAC Pres. Joseph van Elsen, 
of UAW Local 560, Richmond, 
was chairman of the weekend 
meeting, while major reports 
were presented by State Dir. Mor- 
ris Zusman and Secy.-Treas. John 
A. Despol. 

IJERE IS THE full list of con- 
■■ gressional candidates en- 
dorsed by the state central com- 
mittee of the California Natl. 
CIO-PAC: 

Sixth District, Rep. George 
Miller, Jr.; 10th District, Artes 
Walker; 12th District, Stephen 
Zetterberg; 16th District, Mrs. 
Esther Murray; 17th District, 
Rep. Cecil King; 18th District, 
Rep. Clyde Doyle; 19th District, 
Rep. Chet Holifield; 21st District, 
Rep. Harry Sheppard. 

(State PAC was guided in congres- 
sional indorsements by the recom- 
mendations of CIO local unions and 
of the Greater Los Angeles CIO 
Council. In other congressional dis- 
tricts, after investigation by CIO 
locals, recommendations will be de- 
termined by a poll of state central 
committee members.) 


“Denham’s ^bias against organ- 
ized labor has been a long-known 
fact. His differences with the 
board likewise have been known. 
In his New York speech he stated 
bluntly that he felt the board’ was 
not tough enough in administer- 
ing the Taft-Hartley anti-labor 
law. 

“The Taft-Hartley law was en- 
acted as a deliberate vehicle for 
crippling labor. Denham obvi- 
ously feels that the law does not 
go far enough and prefers to bend 
it to his own use providing that 
the employer is the beneficiary. 

“Under those conditions Den- 
ham is not a fit person for the 
job. Since he does not seem in- 
clined to resign, he should, there- 
fore, be removed without further 
ado. And the sooner the better.” 

Twice last week — or at least 
twice — the cry for his ouster came 
again. The executive council of 
the CIO Textile Workers unani- 
mously passed a resolution ask- 
ing for his discharge on the 
ground he has “thoroughly dis- 
credited the office he holds, and 
has demonstrated his utter unfit- 
ness to hold it.” 

T he executive council of 
the American Federation of 
Labor, at its midwinter meeting, 
also branded him unqualified to 
hold his job and asked for his 
dismissal. 

A few weeks ago the CIO Auto 
Workers’ executive board called 
for the removal of Denham from 
office. 

CIO Pres. Philip Murray threw 
the full weight of His prestige 
behind the drive to rid the NLRB 
of Denham after the latter’s New 
York speech. Murray said his 
statement “again demonstrated 
his anti-labor bias and his unfit- 
ness for office.” 

“This action is sufficient proof 
(if any additional proof is need- 
ed) that Denham is incapable of 
administering the important post 
of General Counsel of the board 
with the fairness and impartiality 
that office requires,” he said. 

“During the CIO Convention, 
I issued a statement calling upon 
President Truman to remove Den- 
ham. The President possesses arn- 
ple power to take this action. 
This latest intemperate statement 
by the board’s general counsel 
demonstrates that his removal is 
long overdue.” 

Court Gives 
FTC New Teeth 

The U. S. Supreme Court gave 
the Federal Trade Commission 
some strong new teeth Feb. 6. 
Now the agency can force a 
corporation to supply facts and 
figures showing whether it is 
complying with a cease and desist 
order obtained by FTC in the 
courts. 

FTC, which has the job of regu- 
lating business practices to pro- 
tect competition and the public 
interest, had been defied by two 
salt manufacturers. Morton Salt 
Co. and International Salt Co. 
had refused to turn over detailed 
price and operation information. 
FTC needed the data to check 
whether the two companies were 
actually stopping practices banned 
by FTC as monopolistic. 

The Supreme Court unanimous- 
ly ruled that FTC was completely 
within its rights in demanding 
the report. Justice Robert Jack- 
son declared that the Court on 
many occasions had ruled that 
“corporations can claim no equal- 
ity with individuals in the en- 
joyment of privacy.” 




N 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 13, 1950 






EARLY SCENE from the movie “Intruder in the Dust”: Chick Mallison, acted 
by Claude Jarman, Jr., after a dousing in an icy pond, accepts the hospitality 
of Lucas Beauchamp (played by Juan Hernandez) the proud old Negro who re- 
fuses to take money from a guest. What happened here, later makes Chick 
undertake a desperate deed, driven by a feeling of indebtedness to Lucas. 



EVERYONE IN THE STORE watches tensely as “uppity” Lucas Beauchamp 
selects his purchases, pretending he doesn’t notice the resentful looks the white 
men give him. Setting of this fine movie, which shows the evils of race dis- 
crimination, is an actual small town in Mississippi. Some of the town’s residents 
act in the picture, providing highly realistic atmosphere for the drama. 


If You Have Eyes 
— And Ears To 


By HOLLACE RANSDELL 

C hick mallison was 

just an ordinary young 
boy who happened to live in a 
small town in Mississippi. That 
is, he was ordinary until some- 
thing happened one day to 
change him. 

The story begins when Chick 
falls into an icy pond and is taken 
home by Lucas Beauchamp, a 
dignified old Negro who lives on a 
plot of ground willed him by his 
former master. 

Old" Lucas makes Chick take off 
his wet clothes to be dried in 
front of the fire, feeds him and 
gives him the full hospitality 
of his home. Chick is much 
bothered by all this for it plants 
a conflict in his mind. Under the 
code by which he has been 
brought up, Chick feels he must 
show the Negro that he is an in- 
ferior who should act humbly. 

B y treating Chick as a guest, 
Lucas somehow puts himself 
on an equal basis with the white 
boy. He is being “uppity.” Chick 
tries to establish his superior po- 
sition by pulling out some money 
to pay the Negro for what he has 
^ done. Old Lucas refuses it with 
dignity, telling 'the boy he is his 
guest. Chick petulantly throws 
the money on the floor and orders 
Lucas to pick it up. 

Never for a moment losing his 
poise, Lucas calmly orders a 
young Negro boy to pick up the 
money and return it to Chick, 
who takes it shamefacedly and 
leaves. The old Negro has de- 
feated him. He has broken the 
white man’s code and he has. done 
it by following another cherished 
code — hospitality to a guest. The 
unhappy Chick feels in his debt. 

From this simple incident a 
story is unraveled that makes one 
of the finest and most exciting 
movies on the subject of race 
^ discrimination yet produced — 
“Intruder in the Dust.” It is a 
new film released by Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer, produced and directed 
superbly by Clarence Brown. The 
screen play by Ben Maddow is 
based on a novel by William 
Faulkner. 

The movie in a way is a parable 
illustrating the all-important sub- 
ject of civil rights, and at the 
same time it is a gripping 

8 


mystery story that can hold its 
own with the finest of the sus- 
pense dramas. 

Not that there is any preaching 
In the movie. No*! a word about 
race hatred or injustice is men- 
tioned. The film merely tells a 
fascinating and realistic story of 
what happened in one small 
Mississippi town, and how and 
why a fine old Negro who minded 
his own business and only wanted 
to live in peace and dignity, was 
nearly lynched for something he 
did not do. 

Cowrie, a white man who hated 
Lucas for his “uppity” ways — he 
wouldn’t grovel or bow humbly to 
the whites— is shot in the back 
shortly after he had brutally in- 
sulted the old Negro in the store 
where everybody present saw it. 
Lucas is seized and thrown in jail 
— helplessly trapped in a web 
woven out of the confirmed 


High Court May Act 

A case involving “Lost Bound- 
aries,” a movie about a doctor 
and his family who “passed” as 
white, may reach the U. S. Su- 
preme Court. The case arose 
after the Atlanta, Ga., Board of 
Censors banned the film. 'The 
motion picture industry is claim- 
ing a violation of the First 
Amendment. 


prejudices and injustices of 
whites against Negroes. 

H e is supposed to have the 
right to a lawyer. But the “lib- 
eral” attorney who comes reluc- 
tantly to see him takes for granted 
that the Negro is guilty. It does 
not even occur to him to ask Lu- 
cas about it. A white man has 
been shot in the back. The Negro 
who had cause to hate him has a 
gun with one bullet missing. The 
dead man’s brother and father 
accuse Lucas of the shooting. It 
seemed simple enough to the law- 
yer. Of course Lucas was- guilty, 
he reasoned. 

The old Negro didn’t even try 
to point out to 'the lawyer where 
the proof that he was innocent 
could be found. He knew the 
lawyer would not believe him. 

The dead man had already been 
buried, without the sheriff or his 
men even thinking to remove the 
bullet to check it with Lucas’ gun. 
So it is to the boy, Chick, who 


To See 
Hear 

was sheltered and cared for in the 
Negro’s home that Lucas turns. 

Driven against his will by the 
feeling that he owes Lucas a 
debt/ and that the old Negro is 
not guilty, the boy visits him in 
jail and decides to do what the 
Negro asks — go secretly at night 
and dig* up the body of the 
-murdered man. 

Old Miss Haversham, a re- 
spected white lady (excellently 
acted by Elizabeth Patterson) 
offers to help Chick. It is on this 
odd pair, and a youth drawn into 
the desperate undertaking in spite 
of his fright, that the fate of 
Lucas hangs. For those whose 
duty it is to see that the law 
operates justly have fallen down 

One of the most exciting in- 
cidents in the picture takes place 
at the grave when Chick and the 
Negro boy finally dig down to 
the coffin and find that the body 
is missing. 

Another is the tense scene at 
the jail where Miss Habersham 
sits placidly sewing as she blocks 
the door to keep the mob out. 
The men’s strange mixed code 
makes it seem all right to them 
to lynch a Negro, but no(t to shove 
a white lady around. 

A lthough people from miles 
around come to town to see 
the lynching, as though they were 
going to a circus, and although 
the lawyer, the sheriff and his 
assistants are blind to their duty 
and responsibility, there are 
really no villains in the story — 
except the real murderer. 

It is the immoral code which 
denies the black man justice and 
leaves him outside the protection 
of the law that is evil — noit the 
people. When it -is all over, and 
everybody knows the murderer’s 
identity, the people go home 
quietly, thoroughly ashamed of 
themselves. 

If you want to see a highly 
enjoyable picture spendidly acted, 
don’t miss “Intruder in ithe Dust.” 
Claude Jarman, Jr., as Chick, and 
‘ Juan Hernandez as old Lucas 
Beauchamp act their parts so 
realistically, you’ll feel you’ve met 
them. There is no jarring note in 
any of the acting — no fake south- 
ern accents, no false and sickly 
sentimentality. 

And if you want to find a 'ser- 
mon in the picture, it is entirely 
up to you. 


THE, CIO NEWS,, FEBRUARY 13, 1950 



A CRUCIAL SCENE in “Intruder in the Dust,” showing Lucas 
Beauchamp and the arrogant Cowrie who later is found shot in 
the back. Lucas is accused of the murder and threatened with 
lynching. Even his own lawyer believes him guilty. 



Elizabeth Patterson 
as Miss Habersham, 
the staunch little 
old lady who sits 
calmly sewing while 
guarding the jail 
door from the lynch 
mob. “Go home ! 
You ought to be 
ashamed 
selves,” « 
one of the 
see 








t 









/•»* 

H 








Company-Paid Pension 
Is TWUA’s No. 1 Goal 


C OMPANY - PAID pension 
plans for the nation’s tex- 
tile workers are the No. 1 goal 
of the CIO’s Textile Workers 
in 1950, TWUA Pres. Emil 
Rieve announced last week. 

This decision was voted unani- 
mously by the union’s interna- 
tional executive council at the 
concluding session of a four-day 
quarterly session in New York. 

Rieve said that the council did 
not lay down a formula for the 
kind of pension plans to be 
sought, but instructed the union’s 
insurance and research depart- 
ments to prepare a written analy- 
sis of the various possibilities. 

Union contracts in the major 
divisions of the textile industry — 
cotton-rayon and wool — will not 
expire until early 1951, Rieve de- 
clared, and therefore a definite 
formula need not be evolved until 
later this year. 

T he union is now seeking a 
pension plan from the carpet 
and rug industry, Rieve said, and 
an embryo program has already 
been negotiated with the dyeing 
and finishing industry in the New 
York area. A number of one-com- 
pany plans are also in effect in 
other textile divisions, but they 
might not prove applicable to the 


larger and more scattered cotton- 
rayon and woolen industries, he 
stated. 

R ieve has asked Secy. of 
State Acheson to investigate 
the continued high price of 
Australian wool, with a view to 
ending any “deliberate policies 
designed to victimize America.” 

Rieve released the text of a 
letter he sent to Acheson. In it 
he described the price of wool 
as having a serious effect on the 
competitive position of the woolen 
and worsted industry. He also 
noted - “the presence in some 14 
countries of transferable accounts 
of British sterling,” which enable 
buyers from these countries to 
obtain wool with “cheap pounds” 
instead of dollars. 

Rieve’s letter concluded: 

“We believe that these are mat- ' 
ters of considerable moment and 
should be investigated in order 
not to permit the deliberate poli- 
cies designed to victimize Amer- 
ica by injuring permanently 
the American woolen and worsted 
industry. We hope that your in- 
vestigation will point the way 
toward remedial action and to 
means for correcting any deliber- 
ate practices designed to keep 
the prices of raw wool at the 
current excessively high price.” 


N. Y. State Likely to Take Over 
Control of Residential Rents 


New York State may take 
over control of residential 
rents from the Federal Gov- 
ernment on May 1, according 
to reports in Albany. 

A rent commission which has 
been studying the problem is said 
to be prepared to recommend 
this, with March 1, 1949, as the 
freezing date. 

The date selected is two months 
prior to expiration of federal rent 
controls — an extension of which 
is now being sought in Congress — 
and was selected because tem- 
porary legislation confined to New 
York City expires at that time. 

If enacted as planned, the new 
law would cover the entire state. 
Whether it would apply to areas 
decontrolled by the federal hous- 
ing expediter was not clear. 

In Virginia, the General Laws 
Committee of'the House reported 
approval of a bill to end present 
rent controls. Army, Navy and 
Marine personnel joined with or- 
ganized labor in fighting the bill 
in committee and are expected to 
continue the fight in the House 
itself. 

Thousands of servicemen rent- 
ing houses and apartments in the 
Washington and Hampton Roads 
areas and at Quantico would face 
sharp increases if controls are let 
down, the committee was told. 

I N NEW ORLEANS the Area 
Rent Advisory Board after a 
stormy five-hour session “sin- 
cerely recommended, and ear- 
nestly requested,” that controls 
be extended. 

“We wish to inform Hou.sing 
Expediter Tighe E. Woods,” said 
the resolution, “that there is still 
an urgent and undeniable need 
now and for some time to come 
for federal rent control in the 
New Orleans area because of the 
critical shortage of rental units 
particularly for those in the lower 
and middle income brackets, and 
we know that the housing situa- 
tion in the New Orleans area has 
not yet been reasonably met.” 
Lucille Savoie, secretary of the 


CIO Textile Workers Joint Board 
in New Orleans, recently was 
named a member of the rent ad- 
visory body. 

I N ST. LOUIS, Mo., a noisy effort 
to have controls ended was 
made by landlords who jammed 
a meeting of the Board of Aider- 
men, but with little effect. At its 
conclusion four aldermen came 
out flatly for continuation of con- 
trols and Mayor Joseph M. Darst 
said he still was opposed to de- 
control. 

One spokesman for the land- 
lords admitted rental units were 
being withheld from the market 
until rents rise, and that any 
landlord who did not hold out “is 
a sap.” 

They said a survey by the 
Property Owners League showed 
a vacancy rate of about 3% and 
that hence controls were no 
longer necessary, but Oscar A. 
Ehrhardt, secretary of the St. 
Louis CIO Council, denounced the 
survey as “a bit fictitious” and 
accused the landlords of being 
unwilling to make a factual sur- 
vey “of existing, available units.” 

One alderman said after the 
session that many of the units 
listed as vacant were in buildings 
about to be condemned to make 
way for a new super-highway. 

Rent increases in the Martins- 
burg, W. Va., area were so ex- 
cessive after the removal of con- ' 
trols that William DeChessi, 
Textile Workers’ assistant re- 
gional director, has asked Woods 
for their restoration. 

9,069 Vote For CIO 
In Month, NLRB Says 

CIO unions polled 9069 votes 
to 8998 ballots for AFL unions 
in NLRB collective bargaining 
elections during December, the 
monthly NLRB report showed. 

Unaffiliated unions received 
8355 votes while 7235 workers pre- 
ferred no union. A total of 33,657 
votes was cast in 409 elections. 


ACLUToHold 
AnnualParley 
In New York 

■ ■■||FHE ROUGH Road Ahead” will 
■ be the theme of the annual 
American Civil Liberties Union 
conference Feb. 2 at the Waldorf- 
Astoria Hotel, New York City. 

The one-day conference will be 
climaxed by an anniversary din- 
ner in honor of retiring Dir. 
Roger N. Baldwin, who has 
served in that post since the or- 
ganization was founded in 1920. 

Speakers will include Sen. Leh- 
man (D., N. Y.), Patrick M. 
Malin, new ACLU director; Thur- 
good Marshall, counsel for the 
Natl. Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People; Dr. 
Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., of Har- 
vard Univ.; Prof. Henri Laugier, 
honorary president of the Inti. 
League for the Rights of Man 
and a general secretary of the 
United Nations, and Arthur Gar- 
field Hays, ACTU counsel. 

Following reports to the mem- 
bership, the conference will be 
divided into four section meet- 
ings: Civil rights in trade unions, 
civil liberties on the international 
front, the government and civil 
rights, and Communists and the 
Bill of Rights. 

The conference will be open to 
the public. 

FTC Says ‘Agency’ 
Not Govt. Group 

If some people think they have 
reason to suspect that a company 
calling itself “United States Travel 
Agency, Inc.,” has absolutely no 
connection with the United States 
Government, they’re so right, the 
Federal Trade Commission said. 

The corporation and its presi- 
dent, John E. Smith, Jr., are en- 
gaged in private business as a 
travel and tourist agency, selling 
rail, bus, air and steamship tick- 
ets, hotel accommodations and in- 
cidental services, according to 
FTC. 

The FTC issued a complaint 
which stated that the practice in 
which the corporation has en- 
gaged is “unfair and deceptive” 
and has diverted an undue 
amount of trade to the agency 
from its competitors. The com- 
pany was given 20 days in which 
to answer. 

Rubber Soles Cost 
300 Their Jobs 

The International Shoe Co. has 
announced it will close its. sole 
leather department at St. Louis, 
employing 300, on June 15. The 
firm said increasing use of rubber 
for 'shoe soles forced the move. 
Asked whether the firm would 
find work for the 300 in its five 
other sole leather plants, the 
company head said he could not 
answer the question. The com- 
pany has a contract with CIO 
Shoe Workers. 

Race Bias Charged 
In Insurance Sales 

Democratic legislators have 
warned the N. Y. State Senate 
that they may propose legislation 
for a state insurance fund unless 
insurance companies stop .discrim- 
inating against Negroes. Sen. 
Alfred E. Santangelo, Manhattan, 
called for an investigation. He 
charged insurance firms have re- 
fused thousands of applications 
from Harlem residents and have 
systematically refused to renew 
policies when they expired. 


Bridges Is Accused 
Of Insurance ‘Sellout’ 


A SELLOUT of organized 
labor’s long campaign to 
defeat the California insurance 
lobby and expand the state 
disability insurance program 
has been charged to Pres. 
Harry Bridges and officers of 
the International Longshore- 
men’s & Warehousemen’s Un- 
ion, according to the Cali- 
fornia Edition of the CIO 
News. 

The charge was made by Bill 
Buth, PAG chairman of ILWU 
Ship Clerks Local 34, San Fran- 
cisco, in an open letter distributed 
along the waterfront there. 

Buth denounced the ILWU offi- 
cials for trying to drop disability 
insurance coverage of 12,000 West 
Coast longshoremen and ship 
clerks by the State Disability In- 
surance Plan for a private pro- 
gram he said would provide less 
protection at greater cost. 

“This is a sellout to the very 
same big insurance interests who 
have been fighting our efforts to 
get our disability insurance in- 
creased,” said Buth in his open 
letter. 

■I IF IT HAD NOT been for the 
■ insurance lobbies, we would 
be receiving $35 or $40 per week 
instead of the miserable $25 being 
paid — and you know it. 

“By every trick in the bag, 
efforts have been made to makp 
the membership think that the 
Private Plan is better than the 
State Plan. You know very well 
that it is not. 

“You know that the average 
claim paid by the Private Plan 
is only $154.73 against $227.99 paid 
by the State Plan. 

“You also know that the aver- 
age claim in the Private Plan 
runs only about one-half as many 
days as. the State Plan. They 
stand over us with their doctors 
and ‘take away our check’ as soon 
as the law will permit . . . 

“Why this sellout? Isn’t this 
just another attempt to create 
piecard jobs? 

“Why ask the members to vote 
for a welfare plan before you or 
anyone else knows what the plan 
will be? 

“Why ask the Longshoremen 
and Clerks tb sign to transfer 
their State insurance without first 
explaining to them what they are 
signing? 

“Why don’t you make it known 
to them that this switch to the 
Private Plan will cost some of 
them as much as double what 
they now pay for the State Plan?” 

^HE PRIVATE plan originally 
■ was scheduled to become ef- 
fective Feb. 1. It will not operate. 


however, before the second quar- 
ter, as the State requires a card 
check approval by 75% of the 
workers covered before it will re- 
linquish coverage and allow a 
private firm to take over. 

The ILWU dropped its wage 
and pension demands in negotia- 
tions last October and agreed to 
the joint contribution for social 
insurance. The CIO Steelworkers 
were striking for pensions at the 
time. Locals have approved the 
contract since then in order to 
get employer-paid life and hospi- 
tal insurance. 

All of organized labor in Cali- 
fornia is fighting to improve the 
present State act, but has been 
stymied by the insurance lobby. 
The State Disability Fund has a 
balance of $200 million. All of the 
surplus above a $100 million re- 
serve was paid for by California 
workers, and it has accumulated 
because the insurance lobby has 
defeated every effort to increase 
benefits except for the recently 
effective hospitalization coverage. 

Bethlehem 
Stockholders 
OK Pensions 

gETHLEHEM Steel’s stock- 
holders last week voted 
overwhelmingly to approve the 
$100 a month pension plan ac- 
cepted last November by the 
CIO Steelworkers in settling 
its strike against the firm. 

At the same time, the stock- 
holders turned down a proposal, 
by a similar large margin, to 
amend the pension plan by bar- 
ring pensions in excess of $25,000 
a year. 

The stockholders’ meeting, held 
in Wilmington, Del., was attended 
by some 20 stockholders represent- 
ing more than 7 million shares of 
common and preferred stock in 
the final vote. Only slightly over 
271,800 common and preferred 
shares together were voted 
against accepting the pension 
plan. '!QJie amendment ’was de- 
feated by a vote of about 6^/6 
million shares. 

James Fuller, Hartford, Conn., 
holder of 15 shares of Bethlehem 
Steel stock, questioned the merit 
of the pension plan throughout 
the two and a half hour meeting, 
arguing that it offered nothing 
to the younger employes. He pro- 
posed that the entire plan be 
shelved for 30 days, while a poll 
of employes was taken to see if 
they would not prefer a straight 
10-cent hourly wage increase. 




TWU States Case For 43,000 In N. Y. C. 



PICTURE WITfflN PICTURE: John F. O’Don- 
nell, attorney for the CIO Transport Workers, 
displays a photo to the Fact Finding Board 
named in the dispute between the union and 
the N. Y. City Board of Transpdrtation. The 


displayed photo shows a surface track gang 
in Brooklyn washing in buckets of cold water 
on a street corner because they have no quar- 
ters or shack to use. Hearings were also 
enlivened by beefs against “beakies.” 


A N arbitration award giving 
ni?arly 4000 members of the 
CIO Transport Workers . in New 
york City a wage increase of 6c an 
hour was announced Feb. 7 as the 
union was completing, before a 
fact-iinding board, its case for a 
21-cent pay boost for 43,000 mem- 
bers employed by city-owned lines. 

The arbitration award, repre- 
senting $1,100,000 in back pay, 
ended a long-standing dispute be- 
tween Local 100 and the Third 
Avenue Transit System, a pri- 
vately-owned operation. It was 
handed down by Prof. Emanuel 
Stein of New York University 
after three months of hearings. 
It is binding on both parties but 
must be approved by Federal 
Judge Samuel H. Kaufman, be- 
cause the company is in receiver- 
ship. 

T he wage increase is retro- 
active to. July 1, 1949, and 
will be paid at the rate of $20 
a month. Stein also ordered three- 
week vacations for employes with 
10 years’ or more service, and a 
contract clause barring strikes, 
lockouts, slowdowns or other con- 
certed work stoppages during the 
life of the agreement, which will 
expire next Dec. 31. 

Stein refused to grant severance 
pay, pension improvements, a 
guarantee for extra men, paid 
lunch periods, a night differential 
or payments for uniforms or work- 
ing clothes. 

“The granting of the 6c increase 
and the three-week vacation,” ob- 
served TWU Pres. Michael J. 
Quill and Pres. Matthew Guinan 
of Local 100 “is definite evidence 
that, receivership or no receiver- 
ship, workers must be paid a liv- 
ing wage and be granted decent 
conditions of work.” 

The bulk of the union case be- 
fore the fact finding board, which 
was named by Mayor William 
O'Dwyer, was presented by Gen- 
eral Counsel John F. O’Donnell. 

In addition to the wage raise, 
the union is seeking a 40-hour 
week with 48 hours’ pay, the es- 
tablishment of new grievance ma- 

Bernstein Gets 
Post In Germany 

Meyer Bernstein of the CIO 
Steelworkers research staff has 
been given an indefinite leave of 
absence to take a position as 
labor liaison representative and 
X)bserver in the German Ruhr on 
the staff of the American Occu- 
pation Forces in Germany. 

Bernstein, who has been with 
the Steelworkers since 1936, leaves 
this week for his new post. He 
will maintain contacts with Ger- 
man trade organizations in an 
effort to foster better relation- 
ships between these groups and 
democratic trade unions in other 
countries. 

Bernstein will be associated 
with Harvey Brown, former presi- 
dent of the International Associa- 
tion of Machinists, who is labor 
adviser to U. S. High Commis- 
sioner John J. MoCloy. 

Bernstein has previously repre- 
sented CIO in working with Eu- 
ropean labor groups under ECA 
and also with the labor exchange 
program of the military govern- 
ment in Germany. 

108 Children Aided 

The Society for Seamen’s Chil- 
dren is now caring for 108 young- 
sters, according to a report to the 
CIO American Radio Association 
executive board. 

ilO 


chinery, abolition of a spy system 
and other improvements in work- 
ing conditions. 

O’Donnell asked that the wage 
increase be made retroactive to 
July 1, 1949, the start of the city’s 
current fiscal year. He showed 
that transit workers are paid less 
in New York than in 12 other 
major cities, several of them with 
municipally-operated systems, and 
that they get less than railroad 
employes and truck drivers in 
New York. 

O’Donnell pointed out that the 
city makes ample provision for 
its policemen, firemen and 
teachers, with pay scales at the 
top of the list, and that most 
skilled and unskilled workers in 
the city are paid more than in 
other major cities. 

He also cited the report of a 
Railway Labor Act emergency 
board created in October, 1948, 
which said that “40 basic working 
hours per week with time and a 
half for overtime is the prevailing 
practice in American industry.” 


IJELIS VAN RIPER, secretary- 
" treasurer of Local 100, testi- 
fied that grievance machinery has 
broken down. He suggested that 
supervisors on the intermediate 
level be given a course in han- 
dling day-to-day grievances, and 


War on ‘Beakies’ 

The labor movement has made 
some picturesque contributions 
to the American version of the 
King’s English, and the CIO 
Transport^ Workers have done 
their share. 

They have pinned the name 
“beakies” on the spies employed 
by the New York City Board of 
Transportation to do all the 
dirty little things to workers 
that such spies always do. The 
source of the name is pretty 
obvious and the “beakies,” like 
their counterparts elsewhere, are 
held in great contempt. The 
union is seeking to end the 
system in current contract hear- 
ings before a fact-finding board. 


that shop stewards meet with 
foremen and assistant supervisors 
to straighten out timecards dis- 
putes as they occur. 

The Board of Transportation, 
which operates the system, issued 
a report just before the hearings 
opened indicating a 13c fare, in- 
stead of the present 10c, would 
be necessary if wages are in- 
creased. 

“This is a cheap anti-labor at- 
tempt to agitate (he public against 
the union through the phony 
threat of a 13c fare,” ^ declared 
Quill. “It is a clumsy attempt to 
influence the factfinding board.” 

He asserted that transit facili- 
ties in New York are a public 
service and that funds to main- 
tain them must be obtained lust 
as they are found to maintain 
police, fire and sanitation services. 

“The fares don’t have to be 
raised,” he told the board at its 
opening session. “Let the real 
estate interests get off and walk. 
They have ridden on our backs 
long enough. Real estate has be- 
come great because of the sub- 
way system.” 


Organizationally Speaking 


ALLAN S. HAYWOOD 

The Communications Workers of America- 
CIO have just rung up another great victory 
among workers of the Associated Telephone Com- 
pany of Southern California. The results of the 
election were as follows: CWA-CIO 1916; IBEW- 
AFL 694; neither 209; void 72; challenged 3. Out 
, of 3500 eligible to vote, 2894 votes 

were cast. \ 

Congratulations to CWA-CIO 
Vice-Pres. John Crull who directed 
^ this victorious campaign. June 
^ McDonald and Earl Ludlow of the 
I CWA staff are also to be congrat- 
i ulated. Other direct participants 
were Faye Dunbar, Louis Knecht 
and Lester Keaton, of Division 
I 61, and W. A. Baker, president of 
Division 7. The above were ably 
assisted by Howard Lanning, Andy Anderson, Don- 
ald Barnet, Clarence Harris, Charles Tooley, Leo 
Pequignot, Eugene Bianchin, Lowell Mansfield, 
W. A. Shively and Bruce Blackmore. Congratula- 
tions are in order also to CIO Field Reps. Ben 
Stahl and Alex Blackman, and CIO Reg. Dir. Ir- 
win DeShetler for the splendid assistance they 
rendered the Telephone Workers in this campaign. 

This victory follows last week’s great victory 
in Ohio. These gains speak well for the leadership 
of CWA Pres. Joseph Beirne and his associate 
officers with whom the Cl6 is happy to be co- 
operating. 

On to more victories! 

CIO Reg. Dir. Robert Starnes reports that 
in a representation election at the Gulf States 
Creosoting Co., Meridian, Miss., the workers voted 



as follows: International Woodworkers of 

America-CIO 36; against 6; challenged 4. 

CIO Reg. Dir. Irwin L. DeShetler reports that 
the United Steelworkers of America-CIO were vic- 
torious in a representation election at the Kayner 
Manufacture Co., Los Angeles. USA-CIO Reps. 
Balt Yanez and Scotty Allison were in charge of 
the campaign. 

CIO Reg. Dir. William TayloF reports a UAW- 
CIO victory in a representation election at the 
Paducah Battery Co., Paducah, Ky., by a vote of 
UAW-CIO 82; IBEW-AFL 21. 

Sam Eubanks, Executive Vice President, 
American Newspaper Guild-CIO reports that in 
a representation election covering the business, 
advertising and inside circulation employes of 
the Milwaukee Sentinel, the Guild defeated the 
AFL Office Workers Union by a vote of 80 to 55. 
The Guild already represented editorial and out- 
side circulation departments so the new certifica- 
tion will give the Guild a full industrial unit 
covering the entire jurisdiction of the plant. 

The writer has just returned from Puerto 
Rico, where he had the honor of presenting a 
charter to the trade unionists of Puerto Rico. 
The CIO was well received by the workers and 
the representatives of the liberal a‘nd progressive 
island government. These workers are happy to 
be attached to the CIO. It is now up to our move- 
ment to bring these Americans of Spanish descent 
and language better living standards and greater 
opportunities. Pres. J. S. Potofsky, of the Amalga- 
mated Clothing Workers; John Brophy, Director, 
of Industrial Union Councils-CIO, and the writer 
pledged the ^Puerto Rican workers every support 
ahd assistance of the CIO in achieving their goals. 


IPHJE; CIO EEBEWART T3,^1^30 




Power Lobby 
Propagarf^dd 
Is Debunked 

A ccusing t h e private 
power lobby of trying, to 
keep the South “the economic, 
problem No. 1 of America,” 
Sen. Kefauver (D. Tenn.) re- 
futed /figures of the Edison 
Electric Institute on the cost 
of the Tennessee Valley Au- 
thority to the nation. 

Backbone of the private power 
lobby and one of the biggest 
spenders of all the Washington 
lobbies, the Edison Institute has 
recently intensified its thrusts at 
TVA as part of its fight to keep 
a Columbia Valley bill from pass- 
ing this session of Congress. 

In a New York Times article 
Feb. 2, the Institute charged that 
TVA operations have resulted in a 
totak loss of nearly $120 million 
since 1933. Speaking in the Sen- 
ate, Kefauver tore the Institute 
figures to shreds with an analysis 
of TVA cost allocations. 

T he TVA method, Kefauver 
pointed out, “has been re- 
viewed by both the Federal Power 
Commission and the Corps of En- 
gineers, both experts in this 
field,” and neither agency seems 
to find fault with it. 

Benefits received by the people 
of the U. S. under the TVA multi- 
purpose system include “naviga- 
tion, fiood control, electric power, 
research, fertilizer program, work 
in the wildlife and fisheries field, 
and so forth,” the Tennessee sen- 
ator explained. “If we take the 
Edison Institute argument it means 
we must say that there is no value 
in navigation and flood control, 
and charge them off as zero.” . 

People in the Tennessee Valley 
should pay twice as much for 
their electricity and carry the 
costs of the other services to the 
country at large, according to the 
Edison Institute bookkeeping. 

Kefauver pointed out that Val- 
ley residents, who before TVA 
paid only 3% of the national 
income tax, are now paying 6%. 

Fired Vet Sues 
To Get Back Job 

James Kutcher’s loyalty to the 
U. S. government was likely taken 
for granted when he served in the 
Army during the last war. 

When he lost both legs in the 
battle of St. Pietro, Italy, in 1943, 
they probably pinned some medals 
on him for loyalty to his country. 
Today, however, the war is over. 
The 37-year-old Newark, N. J., 
veteran was forced to file suit in 
Washington, D. C., on Feb. 9 in 
an attempt to regain his job with 
the Veterans Administration. He 
was fired last year because he ad- 
mitted membership in the Social- 
ist Workers Party. His suit claims 
that he was never given an oppor- 
tunity to dispute the findings. 

Kutcher named as defendants 
Veterans Administrator Carl 
Gray; Att. Gen. J. Howard Mc- 
Grath; members of the Civil Serv- 
ice Commission and members of 
Pres. Truman’s Loyalty Review 
Board. 

His fight for reinstatement is 
backed by national CIO and other 
labor and liberal bodies. 


Bucks For PAC Are 
Knockout Drops 
To Lick Labor>Hating 
Dixiegops 






Tax Ax Tough on Widows, A Tap for Oil Tycoons 


By NATHAN ROBERTSON 

For Labor Press Association 
■THE GOVERNMENT taxes 
wealthy oil operators very 
gently. The same government 
taxes with harshness widows 
and other women who have to 
work to support their families. 

The dramatic contrast dem- 
onstrates how selfish lobbies 
have more power in Congress 
than the people who elect Con- 
gressmen. 

This fact is important for vot- 
ers to remember as the House 
Ways and Means committee con- 
siders President Truman’s pro- 
posals for tax reform. The Ad- 
ministration’s reforms are good 
as far as they go, but they don’t 
go far enough. They would re- 
move some of the most lucrative 
loopholes through which the rich 
escape taxes, but would do little 
to remove inequities for widows 
and poor working women. 

The special interest lobbies may 
be able to block the Truman re- 
forms. They won’t need to block 
reforms for the working women, 
because no one — no one with po- 
litical power, at least — has asked 
for them. 

A n oil operator or a big oil 
corporation is permitted out- 
rageous deductions from his prof- 
its before he calculates how much 
tax he must pay. He is allowed, 
first, to deduct all of his busi- 
ness expense, just as other busi- 
nessmen do. Then he is allowed 
to deduct from his profit any ex- 
penses in developing new wells. 
Other businessmen are not al- 
lowed to deduct such expenses. 
They are considered capital in- 
vestments and can only be de- 
ducted gradually over the life 
of the property. 


B 


UT THAT’S not all: After de- 
ducting this year the expense 
of developing a new well, the oil 
man is then allowed to continue 
to deduct from his profit, for as 
many years as that oil well pro- 
duces, 27^/^% of his gross income 
from that well. Theoretically this 
is to repay him for the capital in- 
vestment in that well — despite 
the fact that he has already de- 
ducted it once in his income tax 
this year. In other words he is 


It’s Easy To Duck The Income Tax Parade 
--Just Buy Yourself A Couple Of Oil Wells 


BY DONALD WOODS 
For Labor Press Association 
A LIST of 10 unnamed individuals who’ escaped 
paying taxes on almost $50 million of income 
during a recent five-year period because of the 
gaping tax loopholes provided for oil and gas opera- 
tors has been submitted to Congress by the Treasury. 
During the same years the?* government imposed 
income taxes on workers making as little as $15 
a week. 

The Treasury also has submitted a list of 20 
unidentified corporations which used the same loop- 
holes in 1947 to escape taxes on almost half a billion 
dollars of profits. Every year these corporations— 
most of them big oil, gas, and sulphur companies 
— use the same loopholes for similar privileges. 

These were only two of many exhibits submitted 
to the House Ways and Means Committee by 
Thomas Lynch, Treasury general counsel, in an 
effort to get Congress at least partially to plug the 
depletion and other loopholes in taxes on gas, oil 
and sulphur companies. 

■BUT there is considerable doubt if Congress will do 
anything about it. Congressmen from the oil and 
gas states, backed by powerful lobbies and helped 
by such Republicans as Rep. Mason (R. 111.), are 
fighting reform. Unless public opinion is aroused, 
there. is little chance of Congress plugging the loop- 
holes. Mason has been making big talk about plug- 
ging loopholes— chiefly loopholes he contends exist 
for the benefit of labor unions and cooperatives — 
but showed little sympathy with Treasury plans for 
plugging the oil depletion loophole, admittedly the 
biggest single joker in the tax laws. 

The newspapers by and large ignored the Treas- 
ury’s sensational figures. The Associated Press, for 
instance, put the lead of its story on a Treasury 
demand for taxes on businesses run by labor unions. 
There was no evidence that this is a big loophole. 
But to the AP, apparently, this was a bigger story 
than figures demonstrating that the oil, gas and 
sulphur companies are escaping more than $400 
million in taxes every year through the oil depletion 
and other loopholes, or that 10 men had escaped 
taxes on nearly $40 million. 

There was no hint of the identity of the 10 tax- 
payers. The Treasury got the figures from income 
tax returns, and under the law could not disclose 


their names. But its figures showed that these 10 
men from 1943 to 1947 had incomes of about 
$62 million, of which $52.6 million came from oil 
and gas operations. 

THEY were able to escape taxes on about $47 

■ million during the five-year period, or an average 
of $4.7 million. Altogether they paid taxes of less 
than $14 million, or about 22% on their incomes 
at a time when wartime tax rates on million-dollar 
incomes ran as high as 80%. 

One man made $10.5 million from oil and gas 
operations, plus nearly $4 million from other enter- 
prises. His special privileges under the oil and gas 
loopholes permitted him to exclude virtually all of 
this income, so that during the five-year period he 
paid total income taxes of only $80,000, or about 
what other businessmen making $150,000 would 
have paid. 

Two other men made about $6 million each dur- 
ing the five-year period and paid only $500,000 each 
in taxes. A fourth made $4.4 million and paid only 
$150,000. 

The 20 corporations, all mineral corporations, 
made net profits in 1947 of $926 million. Special 
loopholes permitted them to duck taxes on about 
$441 million, on which most corporatic(ns would have 
had to pay the regular rate of 38%. As a result they 
had to pay only on $485 million and their total 
taxes were only 19% of their net income. 

THE TREASURY also showed that most of the 

■ benefits from these oil, gas and sulphur loopholes 
go to the big companies, not the little wildcatters 
in whose name they were provided. In 1947 a 
total of 352 corporations got exemptions of $838.7 
million, of which 90% were in excess of those 
allowed corporations in other fields. More than a 
half billion dollars worth of these special privileges 
were enjoyed by the big integrated corporations 
such as Standard Oil, and only $110 million went to 
the companies engaged only in mining oil. 

President Truman has called these loopholes the 
most indefensible in the tax laws. But because of 
the strength of the oil lobby he has not even at- 
tempted to plug them. Instead, he is merely asking 
Congress to tighten them up to catch about half of 
the taxes that have been getting away from the 
Treasury. 


able to deduct the expenses of de- 
veloping that well over and over 
again. 

The net result of all these spe- 
cial privileges written into the 
tax laws at the behest of oil and 
gas industry lobbyists, is that oil 


‘From Banquet Tables Comes 
Wail Of Oppressed Bosses^ 

TfHE DETROIT Board of Commerce was severely criticized in an 
editorial published on the front page of the Feb. 3 issue of the 
Detroit Labor News — official organ of the Detroit and Wayne County 
Federation of Labor (AFL) — for the contents of the full page adver- 
tisements in which it is attacking the Chrysler strikers and other labor 
groups. 

Upon publication of the editorial. Dir. Norman Matthews, CIO 
United Auto Workers’ Chrysler Dept., promptly wrote to Pres. Frank 
X. Martel of the Detroit and Wayne County Federation of Labor, 
expressing the appreciation of the Chrysler workers and the whole 
UAW-CIO for this exhibition of solidarity. The editorial, which was 
addressed to Vice Pres. Harvey Campbell of the Detroit Chamber of 
Commerce, concluded: 

■■■JARVEY, your heart bleeds for the poor folks of Detroit because 
* * they are losing tlieir wages during this strike. 

“Well, we are bleeding too, Harvey, but we know why we are 
bleeding. It is because the workers are engaged in a fight to maintain 
that which their forefathers fought and died for. Thank God the 
automobile workers . . . have the courage to stand up to the industrial 
barons in the auto industry and demand their share of the products 
of that industry. 

“The workers in uniform that were with George Washington at 
Valley Forge knew why they bled. The workers on strike know why 
they are suffering. And they know also why you are crying for the 
milk of human kindness. It is because industry and business is being 
hit in the pocketbook. 

“Harvey, we join you at the wailing wall,^ while throughout the 
length and breadth of the land from the banquet tables comes the wail 
of the oppressed employers.” 


and gas operators and big corpo- 
rations in those industries are able 
to deduct from their income not 
only all of their current expenses 
of doing business, but iip to half 
of the profit remaining after all 
business . expenses have been de- 
ducted. 

Here is the way it might work 
out for a big oil company, which 
enjoys today a net income of $100 
million a year from pumping gas 
and oil. If the company this year 
invests $10 million in developing 
new oil wells, that $10 million 
can* be deducted from this year’s 
profits. In addition, the govern- 
ment allows it to deduct 27^/^% 
of its gross income up to 50% of 
its net as a special “depletion al- 
lowance” to cover — at least in 
theory — its capital investment. 
That capital investment may have 
long since been repaid, except for 
this year’s $10 million. So the 

Virginia lUC Head 
At Church Parley 

The Methodist Church has .ap- 
pointed the Rev. Charles C. Web- 
ber, president of the Virginia 
State Industrial Union Council, as 
a delegate to the National Study 
Conference on the Church and 
Economic Life to be held Feb. 
16-19 in Detroit. 

The conference is sponsored by 
the Federal Council of the 
Churches of Christ in America. 
Delegates representing more than 
30 States and 28 Protestant and 
Eastern Orthodox denomihations 
will study a new Christian ap- 
proach to the economic problems 
of modern life. 


company deducts the 50% deple- 
tion allowance, or $50 million, plus 
the $10 million, or a total of $60 
million in deductions. Thus the 
government pays 40% of the cost 
of developing those new wells. 




|OW SUPPOSE the new oil 
well turns out $5 million 
worth of oil each year, on which 
the company makes a profit of 
$2 million after all expenses. That 
means that next year its net in- 
come, after all expenses, is $102 


million. But the government al- 
lows it to deduct up to half of 
this net income from taxes as the 
special “depletion allowance.” So 
the company has to pay taxes on 
only $51 million of profit, instead 
of paying on $102 as other busi- 
nesses would have to do. The dif- 
ference is about $20 million. For 
all oil and gas companies, the dif- 
ference — or the special gift from 
the government — adds up to more 
than $400 million. 

Now let’s consider the case of 
a widow, left with two small chil- 
dren and an income of only $1600 
a year — perhaps the widow of a 
GI. She finds she must go to work 
to support her family and gets a 
job as a nurse or stenographer. 
But in order to take a job she has 
to hire a helper to take care of 
the children and keep house dur- 
ing the day. That is a far more 
legitimate business expense than 
many of the deductions allowed 
the oil company. 

Yet under the law that woman 
has to pay taxes on her whole 
gross income, and not just her 
net income after business expense. 
Let’s say she makes $3000 a year 
and the help she hires to take 
care of the children costs her 
$1500 a year. Her net income is 
only $1500 a year. But she has 
to pay taxes on the entire $3000. 
She has the usual personal ex- 
emption of $600 for each member 
of her family, of course, but that 
barely covers the income she gets 
from her insurance, or from 
Other sources. 

QO THIS poor woman, strug- 
^ gling to raise a family on a 
total of about $3000 a year, net 
income, is treated by our present 
tax laws much more roughly than 
ordinary businessmen, and en- 
tirely differently from the rich 
oil operators who can deduct not 
only their current business ex- 
pense, but also huge and fictitious 
depletion allowances. 

Two Congressmen have recog?* 
nized this injustice and propose 
doing something about it. They 
are Reps. Helen Gahagan Doug- 
las (D. Calif.) and Kenneth Keat- 
ing (R. N. Y.). But their bills 
have been pending for a long time 
without even a hearing. There 
will be no hearing for them un- 
less organized labor or some other 
powerful group with an interest 
in working people gets angry and 
demands a hearing. 


PAC Buck A Nifty 
To Win Race in ’50 





N 


.<V. -•* 

tike to meet up with that bird just once.’’ 
THE OlO NEWS, FEBRUARY 13, 1360 


n 






Dixiegops Delay Action On Co-op 


■|TIE DIXIEGOPS on the 

Senate Banking Committee 
on Feb. 10 caught Adminis- 
tration Senators off base and 
put through a motion to. post- 
pone action on the President’s 
middle-income housing bill for 
two weeks. 


The motion ostensibly was 
made in order to give the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board a chance to 
make a study of the possible 
‘‘inflationary” effects of the meas- 
ure on the national economy. 

Its original target, however, 
was the cooperative housing sec- 
tion of the bill, which has been 
indorsed by labor and liberal 
groups throughout the country. 

The cooperative section would 
allow the government to sell 
Treasury-guaranteed debentures 
on the private investment market 
and, with the proceeds, make 
long-term, low-interest loans to 
genuine housing cooperatives and 
other non-profit organizations 
aiming to build homes either for 
sale or for rental. 

It has been estimated that, 
with the real estate speculator 
out of the picture and under the 
favorable interest rates proposed 
in the bill, accommodations similar 
to those now • renting in the 
neighborhood of $90 a month 


JOHN GREEN, CIO Shipbuilding Workers’ 
President and Secretary of the National CIO 
Housing Committee, not only testified before 
the House Banking Committee Feb. 10 but 
presented the Senate with a petition from 
tenants of his own houssing development, the 


Audubon cooperative in Camden, N. J. Shown 
here are Green, Senator John J. Sparkman 
(D., Ala.), and Dan Baskin, of the Bellmar 
Park co-op at Gloucester, N. J., who also 
bropght a petition. The shipbuilding union 
sponsored both projects. 


appealed to the committee to ap- 
prove the bill, not only because 
middle-income groups are the 
“forgotten families” in the pres- 
ent housing program but because 
“you can’t sell democracy with 
slogans.” 

“Certainly, the housing prob- 
lem is one of the most glaring 
examples of the serious lag be- 


tween what democracy promises 
on the one hand and what it prac-^ 
tices on the other,” ~ Green said. 
“Here is a chance to close that 
gap.” 

He explained the difficulties 
that U. S. unionists have in ex- 
plaining to their. European coun- 
terparts why it is that this na- 
tion, physically untouched by the 


war, is lagging so far behind in 
housing. , 

(In spite of its record prodihc- 
tion of new housing in 19Jf9, the 
U. S. was a poor fourth, 'building 
only seven new units per 1000 of 
population, compared with be- 
tween and 32 in Sweden, New 
Zealand and Canada.) 


Housing 

■■MOTHING would help in 
strengthening the whole in- 
ternational force of freedom in its 
fight against totalitarianism more 
than if we could really do a good 
job on the housing front,” Green 
said. 

Furthermore, he added, good 
housing is at least one answer to 
the growing juvenile delinquency 
problem in this country. “If a 
child gets into trouble because 
he lacks decent housing, decent, 
wholesome recreational facilities 
and an opportunity for healthy 
expression, we are always willing 
to build new jails,” Green said. 
“I say we should build fewer and 
fewer jails and more and more 
houses.” 

In the past several days, the 
House Committee has heard wit- 
nesses from the private lending 
agencies, all of them opposing the 
bill. 

They ^dvanced a variety of 
pious reasons, but none of them 
neglected to point out to the 
committee that the government 
was proposing to lend money to 
cooperatives at a lower interest 
rate and on longer terms than the 
mortgage bankers. 

One witness, Oscar R. Kreutz 
of the National Savings & Loan 
League, tried to tell the com- 
mittee that the U. S. was well 
ahead of the /est of the world in 
housing progress. 

Turned out, however, that he 
had drawn up figures comparing 
new housing construction in the 
U. S. and Europe in the years 
1939-47. 


OK’s, Congress Stalls 


would be available for $65 or less. 
The people who reap the extra 
|25 are objecting. 

The motion to postpone action 
for a fortnight, made by Senator 
Charles W. Tobey (R., N. H.), was 
preceded by a direct attack on 
the co-op section, made by Sen. 
John Bricker (R., O.), who moved 
to strike it from the bill entirely. 
This was defeated by a narrow 
margin. Sen. William Fulbright 
(D., Ark.) then asked for an “in- 
flation” study on the co-ops. Ful- 
bright’s motion was amended by 
Sen. Ives (R., N. Y.) to include the 
entire bill in the study. Tobey 
then proposed his two-week dead- 
line. The vote was not made 
public, but it was close. 

Effect of the postponement will 
be to defer Senate action on the 
bill, of course. Also contained 
in the bill is authority to con- 
tinue the Federal Housing Ad- 
ministration which otherwise 
would expire March 1. In the 
past. Congress has continued 
FHA by simple resolution and 
this may happen again. However, 
administration supporters had 
hoped to report the bill in one 
piece, perhaps thus rousing extra 
support for the co-op section. 

Committee chairman Burnet R. 
Maybank (D., S. C.), and Sen. 
John Sparkman (D., Ala.), who 
chaired the sub-committee which 
just two days ago approved the 
bill by a 6-1 vote, were frankly 
surprised at the development. 
Maybank said that presumably 
Federal Reserve had already 
studied the bill, since the Budget 
Bureau already had approved it. 

I^EANWHILvE, hearing before 
the House Banking and Cur- 
rency Committee reached near- 
final stages. 

Jolin Green, president of the 
CIO Shipbuilding Workers and 
secretary of the National CIO 
Housing Committee, dramatically 


Cleveland 

The Cleveland City Council 
by a 25 to 7 vote has enacted 
a local fair employment prac- 
tices ordinance which replaces 
a “voluntary” plan that pro- 
duced nothing but “some head- 
way” after a year of intensive 
effort by its backers. 


Passage of the ordinance was 
a clean-cut victory for the Citi- 
zens' Committee for Fair Employ- 
ment Practices, a labor and liberal 
group, and the Democratic Party, 
which took over and pushed the 
measure through City Council 
while the Republicans were giv- 
ing lip service. Mayor Thomas A. 


Burke backed the legislation. 

The Chamber of Commerce, 
originally behind the voluntary 
plan, jumped on the FEPC band- 
wagon, a tacit admission that the 
voluntary effort had failed. It 
offered a couple of amendments 
acceptable to the Citizens' Com- 


on FEPC 

mittee and the^ measure was. 
passed easily. 

The “some headway” after the 
first year of the voluntary plan 
was reported by those who fa- 
vored it and who had spent thou- 
sands of dollars on literature, ad- 
vertising, radio time and trolley 
cards. 

^HE ORDINANCE makes un- 
■ lawful, under penalty of a fine 
up to $100 and 10 days in jail, 
discrimination with regard to em- 
ployment, hiring or union mem- 
bership solely on the basis of race, 
creed, color or national origin. 

Advertising relating to employ- 
ment or membership cannot con- 
tain any reference to race, creed 
or color, and no job applicant can 
be asked about his race, creed, 
color, national origin or ancestry. 
Discrimination likewise is barred 
in all city cofitracts for public 
work. 

Administration of the law will 
be in the hands of a new Com- 
munity Relations Board consist- 
ing of the mayor, one member of 
City Council and five members 
representing industry, three rep- 
resenting labor and six represent- 
ing the public: The board and the 
mayor will attempt to adjust all 
complaints before submitting 
them for prosecution. 

Action on the FEPC measure 
was bogged down in Washington. 

Feb. 8 was another Calendar 
Wednesday in ’the House and 
Chairman Lesinski (D. Mich.) of 
the Labor Committee again was 
all set to call for action on the 
bill which his committee approved 
weeks ago and which has been 
stuck in the Rules Committee. 
But the Civil Service and Bank- 
ing Committee and the District 
Committee were ahead of the 
Labor Committee on the call list, 
and the legislative day was over, 
before Lesinski had a chance 
to act. 


Keep Your Eye On Congress 


WHAT IT DOES 


WHERE IT IS 


BIIX 

Taft-Hartley 

Repeal 


Fair Employment 
Practices Commission 
S. 1728 
HR 4453 


Middle-Income 
Housing Bill 
S. 2246 
HR 6618 


Social Security 
Improvements 
HR 6000 


Federal Aid 
To Education 
S. 246 


Labor Extension 
Service Bill 
S. ifo 
HR 1380 


Would repeal most vi- 
ciously anti -labor bill, 
reinstitute Wagner Act, 


Bars discrimination in 
industry based on race, 
creed or color; provides 
penalties for job bias. 


Provides for long-term, 
low-interest U. S. loans 
to co-ops for building 
moderate - cost housing 
projects, etc. 

Extends, improves old 
age, survivors benefits, 
etc., under social se- 
curity. Lifts benefits, 
ups coverage by 11 
million. 

Provides over $300 mil- 
lion aid to states for 
schools; gives states 
broad power to super- 
vise use of funds. 

Provides workers' edu- 
cation program in coop- 
eration with schools, 
unions, Labor Dept. 


Pigeonholed in Con- 
gress. 


Senate bill on calendar, 
may come up next 
month. House support- 
ers seeking to get bill 
on floor for debate. 

Senate Banking Com- 
mittee has completed 
hearings; House hear- 
ings started Jan. 30. 


Passed House last ses- 
sion. Senate Finance 
Comm, now holding 
hearings. CIO to testi- 
fy soon. 


Bill, approved by CIO, 
has passed Senate. Has 
been stuck in House La- 
bor Comm, for months. 


Approved b y Senate 
Labor Comm. House 
Labor Comm, is still 
studying bill. 


WHAT TO DO 

Keep writing to Sen- 
ators, Representatives 
to force T-H ^repeal. 


Write, wire Senators, 
Congressmen to sup- 
port and seek earliest 
possible vote. 


Ask Senators, Congress- 
men to give bill full 
support. 


Ask Senators to try to 
strengthen HR 6 0 0 0 
over present provisions. 


« 

Ask members of House 
Labor Comm, to OK 
Senate bill. . 


Ask Senators, Congress- 
men to seek early pas- 
sage. 


(Address all Senators at Senate Office Building, Washington 25, D. G. 
Address all Representatives at House Office Building, Washington 25, D. C.) 


12 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 13, 1960 


N 



CIO PRES. PHILIP MURRAY (right) tells newsmen at Washington con- 
ference about Executive Board action against four Communist-dominated 


unions as Secy.-Treas. James B. Carey (second from right) looks on. Ses- 
sion was held last week at National CIO headquarters. 




V- 


V'- 


V* 


r 


r 


' 4 *' 


The CIO Executive Board, meeting for three days last >veek, struck a sharp blow at Communist infiltration 
into American labor. 

The Board also adopted a series of resolutions calling for quick action on the Fair Deal legislation program; 
pledging aid to hundreds of thousands of workers now on strike or facing strike action; and seeking to strengthen 
the peace and labor’s ties with workers in other lands. Highlights of the Board’s action: 


• Expelled four unions as Communist-dominated: (1) Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers; (2) United Office & Pro- 
fessional Workers; (3) Food, Tobacco & Agricultural Workers; (4) United Public Workers. The four unions 
have less than 100,000 members, large numbers of whom are expected to remain loyal to the CIO. 

• Authorized CIO’s officers to take'^ steps to organize the industries in which the expelled unions have failed. 

• Ratified withdrawal of charter from California CIO Council, on grounds it was Communist-dominated. 

• Voiced full support to the strike of auto workers at Chrysler and to the strike of the United Mine Workers. 

• Gave full CIO backing to the Communications Workers iii their effort to win better conditions at Bell. 


• Urged unions and their members to speed up political action work for the vital 1950 campaign. 

• Called on Congress to pass Fair Deal program. CIO particularly urged action on Taft-Hartley repeal, FEPG, 
better minimum wage bill, improved tax program, middle-income housing, improved social security, and legale 
ization'of maritime hiring practices. 

• Renewed demands for removal of NLRB General Counsel Denham and ending of injunctions in labor disputes. 

• Pledged every effort to improve conditions for growing number of jobless workers, and to seek programs to 
end unemployment. 

• Called for well-rounded international program to strengthen peace and aid peoples in Europe and under-de^ 
veloped areas; approved CIO’s ties with the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions. 


• Established new CIO International Committee, headed by Jacob S. Potofsky of the Clothing Workers. 



Chrysler Strikers ^Hit Line ’ 3 Out Of 10 Jobless Are 
In Autos; CIO Pledges Aid Ineligible For Benefits 


S TRIKING CIO Auto Work- 
ers last week began the. 
fourth week of the Chrysler 
walkout by throwing an auto 
picket line around two Detroit 
plants of the company. 

A cavalcade of several hundred 
«triker-driven autos formed a 
bumper-to-bumper blockade 
around the huge plants, com- 
pletely blocking off entrances. 
The demonstration lasted two 
hours. Heretofore the walkout 
had been practically picketless. 

Meanwhile, negotiations contin- 
ued with little progress reported. 
Chrysler officials were studying a 
new set of union proposals sub- 
mitted by the 125-man National 
tJAW Chrysler Conference. 

Ordinarily the contract would 
not be open on any issues except 
economic proposals — which in- 
cludes pensions — until the con- 
tract expiration date, Aug. 1, 1950. 

A contract clause provides, how- 
ever, that in the event of a strike, 
the whole agreement is open to 
negotiations. 

T he CIO Executive Board meet- 
ing in Washington last week 
leveled a blast at the stubborn 
attitude of the Chrysler Corp. in 
refusing to negotiate a settle- 
ment and pledged the “unstinted 
backing of all CIO unions to 
assist the UAW in carrying the 
strike to a victorious conclusion.” 

The board accused Chrysler of 
refusing, after seven months of 
bargaining, to negotiate a settle- 
ment based on the recommenda- 
tions of the steel fact-finding 
board or to follow the pattern set 
by the Ford Motor Co. in the 
auto industry. 

UAW officials indicated that the 
present attitude of the company 
is not surprising in view of the 
fact that one of the company 
negotiators is Herman Weckler, 
vice president and general man- 
ager. 

Veteran UAW members remem- 
ber Weckler well. Back in 1937 
he was an uncomfortable witness 
before the LaFollette Committee 
which was investigating the ac- 
tivities of an organization hired 
by the Chrysler Corp. to make 
reports on workers seeking to 
form a union. The name of private 
detective agency was - Corpora- 
tions Auxiliary, Inc. 


PRESIDENTS of three CIO Auto Workers’ locals in Indiana 
participated in the radio program, ''Chrysler Reports,” which 
is broadcast over UAW’s FM Detroit station, WDET. Here 
Guy Nunn interviews (1. to r.) Floyd Abston, Local 371, New 
Castle, Ind.; Robert Stine, I^cal 685, Kokomo, Ind.; and John 
Sterneman, Local 705, Evansville, Ind. 

900 On Strike 4 Months 
Over Firing of Brothers 


A lthough somewhat 
overshadowed by the four- 
week-old Chrysler strike, 900 
CIO Auto Workers at the De- 
troit plant of Gar Wood In- 
dustries who walked out Nov. 
19 last year, are determined 
to stay out until two dismissed 
workers, Brown and Lloyd 
Dian, brothers, are reinstated 
with full back pay. 

The strike began, according" to 
UAW Reg. 1 Dir. Michael F. Lacey, 
when the two were fired as a 
result of a dispute over working 
conditions. The other workers 
promptly walked out in protest. 
Gar Wood manufactures marine 
engines at " the struck plant. 

Shortly afterwards, the com- 
pany offered to modify its original 
action and offered instead of dis- 
missal, a three-month disciplinary 
layoff. 

W HEN THE workers refused 
this offer, the company then 
proposed a one-month disciplinary 
layoff for the two but that was 
also turned down. 

The union insists that both be 
returned to work immediately and 


the issues then arbitrated. The 
company has twice refused. 

Meanwhile the two brothers 
were again ruled eligible for un- 
employment compensation bene- 
fits by the Michigan Unemploy- 
ment Compensation Commission. 
A second ruling was necessary 
because the company appealed an 
earlier decision in their favor. 

L acey hailed the ruling as 
“emphasizing again the fact 
that the Gar Wood employes were 
forced on strike by the arbitrary 
conduct of the company in wil- 
fully violating written agreements 
with the union. 

“We hope the public will note 
that this development again re- 
flects the union’s efforts to be 
fair and reasonable throughout 
this dispute. We have offered to 
arbitrate, but Gar Wood has re- 
fused. We accepted a proposed 
strike settlement offered by state 
mediators, but again the company 
refused. 

“It is this kind of an attitude 
on the part of the company that 
has compelled Local 250’s mem- 
bership to stick it out air these 
months in order to win an honor- 
able settlement.” 


‘Unstinted Backing of All CIO Unions^ 
Is Pledged UAW in Chrysler Strike 


CIO Executive Board pledged the “unstinted 
■ backing of all CIO unions” to the members of the 
Auto Workers on strike against the Chrysler Corp. 
The text of the resolution follows: 

WHEREAS, (1) 90,000 employes of the Chrysler 
Corporation, represented by the UAW-CIO, have 
been on strike for three weeks in an effort to win a 
pension plan and medical and hospital plan consist- 
ent with the gains won in other industries; 

(2) The Chrysler Corporation stubbornly refused 
after seven months of bargaining, to negotiate a 
settlement based on the recommendaions of the Steel 
Fact-Finding Board appointd by President Truman, 
or to follow the pattern set by the Ford Motor Com- 
pany in the auto industry; 

(3) Chrysler Corporation officials still refuse, as 
the strike enters its fourth week, to bargain in good 
faith on the basis of the afore-mentioned patterns — 
but demand instead that the workers accept an un- 
sound pension proposal worth only 3c per hour with 
no financial guarantees of its security and no voice for 
the union in its administration; 

(4) ^The voldme of profit enjoyed by Chrysler 


Corporation in recent years is ample to finance a 
funded and actuarially sound pension plan that would 
insure the benefits payable to retiring Chrysler work- 
ers; 

(5) The Chrysler workers are justified in making 
a demand for a pension plan meeting the 10c per 
hour pattern already established, because this amount 
is needed to make it sound enough to carry the cost 
of liquidating past service credits and insuring bene- 
fits through funding; and 

(6) The solidarity of the Chrysler workers in sup- 
X>ort of their demands deserves the whole-hearted 
moral and financial support of th entire labor move- 
ment in America. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED: 

That the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 
speaking for million^ of organized workers in basic 
American industries, salutes the Chrysler workers for 
their determined fight for economic security, and 
pledges the unstinted backing of all CIO unions to 
assist the UAW-CIO in carrying the Chrysler strike 
to a victorious conclusion. 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 20; 1960 


T he CIO Full Employment 
Committee, in a resolution 
indorsed by the CIO Executive 
Board at its meeting last week, 
called upon all CIO councils 
and community service com- 
mittees to give the jobless 
vigorous representation before 
public and private agencies 
concerned with them. 

“We call for the enactment of 
the basic CIO platform,” the res- 
olution said, “including an ex- 
panded housing program, resource 
development plans, a more equi- 
table tax structure, $1 minimum 
wage, and an expanded social se- 
curity program to help insure the 
long-run growth and stability of 
our ^onomy. 

“Unemployment compensation 
and public assistance remain the 
first line of defense for the unem- 
ployed and they should be imme- 
diately improved by federal leg- 
islation to extend coverage, in- 
crease benefits and extend the 
duration of payments.” 

T he resolution noted that 
nearly five million workers 
are now unemployed, a postwar 
high, and that seyeral million ad- 
ditional are working part time. 

“Under the inadequate system 
of unemployment compensation,” 
it pointed out, “more than three 
out of every 10 workers are not 
even eligible for benefits. Fur- 
thermore, in the third quarter re- 
port of 1949 the Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisers reports that a 
half-million people exhausted 
their rights to further benefits. 


Food Price Index 
Up 6 More Points 

The Dun & Brad street whole- 
sale food price index rose still 
higher last week — ^ six more 
points to $5.86, the highest since 
the $5.89 registered Aug. 16, 
1949. 

The previous week the index 
rose only Ic, from $5.79 to 
$5.80. The index is compiled 
by adding the wholesale prices 
per i>ound of 31 foods commonly 
used. Increases in it are normally 
reflected later in higher retail 
pries. 


Even when workers are eligible 
for unemployment insurance pay- 
ments, the present weekly average 
of $21 is far too small to cover 
even the bare necessities of life. 

‘Thousands o f unemployed 
workers are thus caught between 
prices that are still at inflationary 
levels and an inadequate unem- 
ployment compensation program.” 

The CIO also called for a farm 
policy geared to maximum con- 
sumption through lower prices, 
increased aid to economically 
stricken areas, a public works 
program, and a special oflSce for 
affairs of the unemployed in th« 
U. S. Dept, of Labor. 

“The entire nation suffers as a 
result of unemployment,” the res- 
olution said. “By the same token 
the entire nation can benefit from 
the increased flow of goods and 
services stemming from a success* 
ful f-ulJL employment program.” 


CCL Plans Federation 
Of Unemployed Workers 


T he CANADIAN Congress of 
Labour is planning to organize 
jobless workers into an organiza- 
tion to be known as the National 
Federation of Unemployed Work- 
ers. 

CCL Secy.-Treas Pat Conroy 
said the plans for the formation 
of local unions of jobless workers 
have been sent to some 50 labor 
councils aflfiliated with the Con- 
gress. A national office has been 
set up in Toronto. 

Joseph MacKenzie of Toronto, 
president of the Ontario Federa- 
tion of Labor and a member of 
the CCL executive committee, had 
been appointed NFUW national 
director. MacKenzie was formerly 
Canadian director of the CIO 
Rubber Workers and haus broad 
experience in Canadian trade 
unionism. 

Sam Baron, Canadian director 
for the CIO Textile Workers 
Union,’ has been named to head 
the NFUW planning committee. 

Murray Supports 
Red Cross Campaign 

CIO Pres. Philip Murray has 
urged support of CIO members 
and their families for the Ameri- 
can Red Cross Drive which begins 
throughout the nation March 1. 

“Again this year, as in years 
past, I should like to call the at- 
tention of the American people 
generally and to the members of 
the CIO particularly, the noble 
aims and objectives of the Ameri- 
can National Red Cross,” Murray 
said. 

“It goes without saying t^at 
the number of services the Red 
Cross will be able to perform will 
be in direct proportion to the 
amount of money raised.” 


N 


A committee will be appointed 
by each council to work with the 
officers elected by the members 
Charters will be issued by the 
NFUW’s national ofl&ce, and a na^ 
tional convention will be called 
as soon as possible after the locals 
are , established, Conroy said. 

The CCL’s action was taken to 
meet the present serious unenv- 
ployment situation in the Domin- 
ion. Some 300,000 workers, about 
7% of the labor force, are re- 
ported unemployed, with the 
trend still continuing downward. 

Conroy said the first function 
of the locals of unemployed would 
be to try to get jobs for their 
members, either with private busi-' 
ness or in public projects. If it 
is found impossible to locate jobs, 
the NFUW hopes to formulate 
policies calling for a decent living 
standard for the unemployed. 

27 Win Back Jobs, 
$16,000 Back Pay 

“It was a long fight but 27 jobs 
and $16,000 are worth fighting 
for,” said Secy. Joe Clark of the 
California Council of the CIO 
Woodworkers in reporting an 
IWA victory in an eight-month 
battle with the Oroville, CaL 
Lumber Co. ♦ 

As a result of a Natl. Labor 
Relations Board order, 27 IWA 
strikers have been reinstated to 
their jobs with full, seniority 
rights and will receive $16,000 in 
back pay. ^ 

NLRB, charges were filed, after, 
the IWA cr^ went on strike l£ist 
May and the firm signed up a. 
group belonging to the AFL Car- 
penters and Joiners. 






Ban On Hiring Halls 
Aids Commies— Curran 



PROTEST: Pres. Joseph Curran of the CIO Natl. Maritime 
Union (1.) and Pres. John Green of the CIO Shipbuilding 
Workers leave the White House after urging President Truman 
to halt transfer of merchant vessels to foreign registry. 


Request For T-H 
Repeal Renewed 


By GERVASE N. LOVE 

T he Supreme Court of the 
United States, in all its 
power and might, last week 
fostered the return of the 
crimp joint and shanghaiing as 
the standard of hiring in the 
nation’s maritime industry. 

By refusing to review a lower 
court decision which used the 
Taft-Hartley act to outlaw the 
union hiring hall, the Supreme 
Court in effect ordered abandon- 
ment of the order which had been 
brought into the industry by or- 
ganized labor. In effect it spon- 
sored restoration of the notorious 
hiring masters who formerly re- 
cruited crews for the U. S. mer- 
chant marine through saloons and 
bawdy houses, knockout drops 
and brass knuckles. 

“This will give the Commies a 
field day on the waterfront," com- 
mented Pres. Joseph Curran of 
the CIO National Maritime 
Union. 

The comment came when Cur- 
ran was advised of the Supreme 
Court action as he left the White 
House after a conference with 
President Truman. 

“In this case," he said, “the 
Taft-Hartley act has done a great- 
er service to Communism than 
anything on the waterfront. We 
don’t get any help when we try 
to clean up an industry." 

T he ruling the Supreme Court 
refused to review was made by 
the U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals 
in New York at the behest of the 
National Labor Relations Board 
in a case involving hiring prac- 
tices on the Great Lakes. The 
NLRB contended the union hiring 
hall is illegal because of asserted 
discrimination between union 
members and non-union men. 

The hiring hall is used by most 
unions in the industry, both CIO 
and AFL. Under it, the unem- 
ployed seamen signs on at the 
bottom of a hiring list. Jobs are 
filled from the top of the list. 
Thus the man longest out of work 
gets the first job. If the union 
can’t supply a man, the employer 
can hire anyone he wishes. 

Curran also issued a formal 
statenient which was indorsed by 
the CIO Executive Board, in ses- 
sion at the time. The board 
pledged the entire support of CIO 
to the NMU “as well as every 
other maritime, CIO, AFL and in- 
dependent, in their fight to pre- 


serve orderly hiring practices and 
to prevent a return to the vi- 
cious malpractices of the past." 

“The action of the Supreme 
Court," said Curran, “is a menac- 
ing blow to the stability of our 
American maritime industry. 

“The NMU is filing immediately 
a petition for rehearing of this 
important case. We are convinced 
that the gravity of the situation 
makes imperative a full hearing. 

“Whatever the outcome of the 
case in the courts, the NMU and 
its members, as well as every oth- 
er maritime union, CIO, AFL and 
independent, are determined that 
there shall be no return to the 
vicious hiring malpractices of the 
past." 

T he scores O'f labor-manage- 
ment experts who have studied 
operations of the NMU hiring 
system, said Curran, have “al- 
most unanimously" praised it. He 
said that NMU members, “better 
than anyone else, know the rot- 
ten, corrupt and biased methods 
of hiring which have been wiped 
out by the NMU and other mari- 
time unions." 


“Anyone who knows American 
seamen," he went on, “is well 
aware that they have no intention 
of permitting a return to the cor- 
ruption of the past. They have 
no stomach for the shapeup, for 
shanghaiing, for bribery, for petty 
favoritism as a method of staffing 
the crews of the American mer- 
chant marine." 

Curran predicted that the Com- 
munists will “hail" the decision 
because they know the chaos, bit- 
terness and disillusionment that 
may follow and will seek to capi- 
talize on it for their own ends. 
But responsible, democratic 
unions, he pledged, “will not per- 
mit them to use the decision or 
to disrupt legitimate unionism and 
provoke irresponsible action." 

He blamed the decision on the 
Taft-Hartley act. 

“The organized maritime work- 
ers of America will not let their 
gains be snatched away by this 
evil law," he said. 

“They will fight more vigorous- 
ly than ever for repeal of Taft- 
Hartley as this session of Con- 
gress. They fight for adoption of 
the Magnuson-Lesinski bill to re- 


T HE CIO Executive Board 
at its meeting last week 
twice called for the repeal of 
the increasingly oppressive 
Taft-Hartley act. 

In one resolution it rededicated 
the CIO “to the unfinished task of 
repeal of the Taft-Hartley act and 
re-enactment of the original Wag- 
ner act with improving amend- 
ments,"- and demanded that Con- 
gress “heed the will of the people" 
and wipe T-H off the statute 

books now. 

In the other, directed against 

“the oppressive evil of govern- 

ment by injunction," it called for 
T-H repeal and restoration of the 
Norris-LaGuardia Anti-Injunction 
act to its original effectiveness. 

The Thomas-Lesinski bills were 
offered by the Truman adminis- 
tration at the first session of the 
81st Congress. The CIG urged 

their passage at that time with- 
out crippling amendments. 

“Throughout the debate on 
these bills," the board resolution 
said, “we expressed the firm con- 
viction that the use of injunction 
is neither effective as a means of 
bringing about labor-management 
peace nor sound as an instrument 
of public policy in a democratic 
society." 


store the legal status of accepted, 
proven maritime hiring practices. 

“Justice is on the side of the 
seamen and the other workers of 
the waterfront." 

The Magnuson-Lesinski bill, 
which has been introduced in both 
houses of Cbngress, would legalize 
hiring halls as they have been op- 
erated in the past. Sen. Murray 
(D., Mont.) chairman of a Senate 
labor study subcommittee, said he 
was “sure" his group would look 
into the situation. The hiring hall 
system, he said, “has worked sat- 
isfactorily and it seems to me it 
ought to be continued." He ap- 
peared dubious, however, of the 
chances of the Magnuson-Lesinski 
bill passing at this session 

The Supreme Court ruling was 
handed down on Feb. 13. The 
following day Irving Rogosin, 
NLRB trial examiner, ruled that 
hiring halls operated by the CIO 
Marine Cooks and Stewards be- 
fore a strike in 1948 were illegal, 
and that the union violated T-H 
by agreeing to contracts* continu- 
ing them. However, he ruled, the 
union did not strike illegally to 
secure continuation of the provi- 
sion in the new contract. 


Sen. Taft (R., O.), co-author of 
the Taft-Hartley act, offered 
amendments the resolution said 
“represent merely sops to labor" 
and as Taft himself declared, the 
final version by virtue of the 
amendments “preserved the basic 
principles" of T-H. The amended 
bill was defeated. 

“The CIO is still determined," 
said the resolution, “as it has been 
in the past two and one-half 
years, to secure the removal of 
that unjust law. from the statute 
books and there will be no slack- 
ening of our efforts to this end. 
Our positiori throughout has been 
that we will press forward not 
only for the repeal of the Taft- 
Hartley act but for our ultimate 
objective: improvements in the 
Wagner act to furnish additional 
and much-needed protection to la- 
bor’s basic rights and to insure 
fairness and equity in our federal 
labor policy. 

“It should be obvious to all that 
constructive 1 a b o r-management 
relations cannot long be continued 
in the highly uncertain and de- 
monstrably unsatisfactory status 
imposed by the Taft-Hartley act." 

The other resolution recounted 
organized labor’s half-century 
long struggle against the injunc- 
tion and noted the “great strides 
forward" made when Congress 
passed the Norris-LaGuardia act 
and many states adopted similar 
legislation. 

^ - 

“Since the passage of the Taft- 
Hartley act," the resolution re- 
cited, “we have witnessed the re- 
vival of government-by-injunction 
on an enormous scale. 

“On a federal level reactionary 
employers are enjoying a field day 
as a result of the repressive in- 
junction provisions of the Taft- 
Hartley act. NLRB General Coun- 
sel (Robert N.) Denham has acted 
as the all too willing front for 
these employers in obtaining Taft- 
Hartley injunctions. 

The injunction issued in his 
complaint against the United 
Mine Workers of America is the 
most recent example of the use of 
the Taft-Hartley act to repress 
unions. The Taft-Hartley act, 
furthermore, stipulates for the 
use of injunctions in the case of 
national emergencies. It is under 
this section that a second injunc- 
tion against the United Mine 
Workers was issued. 

“There can be no question, as 
stated by. U. S. Circuit Judge 
Charles Clark, that the Taft- 
Hartley act ‘puts the federal 
courts far into the business of 
terminating strikes.' " 


CIO Board Says ^Denham’s Removal Is Long Overdue’ 


T he CIO Executive Board 
at its meeting last week 
joined the swelling throng of 
those demandin'g that Presi- 
dent Truman oust Robert N. 
Denham as general counsel of 
the National Labor Relations 
Board. 

So did the executive board of 
the Minnesota State CIO Council, 
the Duluth (Minn.) CIO Council 
and the AFL Chicago Federation 
of Labor — all within the previous 
few days. 

The CIO Executive Board’s res- 
olution pointed out that CIO 
Pres. Philip Murray on several 
occasions has called upon Tru- 
man to remove Denham, and de- 
clared ‘it “fully supports Presi- 
dent Murray in his request." 


It denounced Denham for his 
recent attacks on NLRB members 
in speeches before employer 
groups in which he urged them 
to appeal to the courts any board 
decisions they might not like. It 
also rapped the “anti-labor bias 
and prejudice" he demonstrated 
in seeking an injunction against 
the United Mine Workers' strike. 

“^ENHAM'S unseemly attacks 
on the NLRB,” said the res- 
olution, “arise from the fact that 
the board in a ^ew cases has dem- 
onstrated some degree of inde- 
pendence and has disagreed with 
Denham’s biased and prejudiced 
interpretations of the Taft-Hart- 
ley act. 

“The time has come when such 
conduct in a vital governmental 


post can no longer be tolerated. 
Denham’s removal from office in 
the interest of good government 
is long overdue. 

“The Executive Board of the 
CIO calls upon President Truman 
to remove Robert N. Denham as 
General Counsel of the NLRB. 
He is a member of the Executive 
Branch of the government and 
the Chief Executive has the pow- 
er to remove him." 

DENHAM’S waning prestige 
^ took another tumble when an 
NLRB trial, examiner ruled on 
Feb. 13 that the head of the 
NLRB legal department was 
wrong when he complained that 
the CIO Marine Cooks and Stew- 
ards engaged in an illegal strike 
back in 1948. 


The examiner, Irving Rogosin, 
in his intermediate report held 
that the hiring hall clause in the 
union’s contract with the Pacific 
American Shipowners Associa- 
tion was illegal, but that the un- 
ion had not illegally insisted 
upon continuation of the clause. 

In his findings of fact Rogosin 
said that the union in negotia- 
tions insisted upon the old clause, 
which provided for the closed 
shop, until Aug. 30, 1948, when it 
accepted the employers’ proposal 
for “a provision on ‘employment' 
mutually satisfactory." 

“At the ^ very least," he said, 
“the union’s acceptance of this 
proposal was evidence of a will- 
ingness to negotiate with respect 
to hiring provisions which would 
conform to the (Taft-Hartley) 
act" 


The following day, Rogosin con- 
tinued, the union offered a hiring 
plan which “expressly excluded" 
union membership as a basis for 
preference in hiring. The em- 
ployers would have had to con- 
tinue to obtain crews through the 
hiring hall, but “this requirement 
alone would not have rendered 
the hiring provisions illeg€il, if ad- 
ministered without discrimina- 
tion." 

The strike started Sept. 2, 1948. 

“The undersigned has conclud- 
ed," Rogosin wrote in his report 
“that .the objective sought to be 
obtained, apart from the union’s 
economic demands, was a lawful 
hiring arrangement based on the 
union’s proposal of Aug. 31." 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 20, 1950 


3 


CIO Again Moves Against Reds 

Executive Board Orders Four Unions Ousted — But There Es f^uch To Be Done Before Anti-Commie Drive is Compiefe 


By ALLAN L. SWIM 


F our unions which were in the 
CIO early last week are now out 
or on their way out , as a result of 
Executive Board action. 

One was expelled last week. Three oth- 
ers were ordered expelled as of March 1. 
The charge against them was that they 
were Communist dominated. 

This brought to ' six the number of 
unions against which the CIO has taken 
decisive action because they chose to fol- 
low the Communist Party line in prefer- 
ence to CIO policy. Two unions were 
ousted at the last CIO convention. 

S-ix more unions face Communist domina- 
tion charges and they will be dealt with 
later. One of the six — the Furniture Work- 
ers — is making an effort to ‘'clean house.” 
The other five continue to follow the same 
old line. 

N obody who attended the CIO con- 
ventiori last November should haye 
had the slightest doubt about the type 
of action the Executive Board would take. 

Leaders of the CIO and a majority of 


convention delegates made it quite clear 
that they were fed up — completely fed up 
— with the activities of the Communists. 

And the delegates made it quite clear, 
too, that they expected the Board to oust 
unions found guilty of adhering to the 
Moscow line. 

The Board has acted. 

It has acted in accordance with a con- 
vention mandate and in the best interests 
of the CIO and the nation. 

Another blow — and an important -one — 
has been struck at that group of crackpots 
which jumps collectively every time Stalin 
says “frog.” 

T he CIO's housecleaning job is far from 
complete — and months probably will 
be required to complete it. 

Charges against six unions are still pend- 
ing. It will take considerable time for 
hearings to be held and for the Board to 
act on recommendations of the hearing 
committees. 

Any or all of the six unions may go into 
court seeking injunctions in an effort to 
prevent explosion. 


The big job, is to free American workers 
from Communist domination — not merely 
to oust Red unions from the CIO. 

As has been demonstrated in the elec- 
trical industry, the party-liners don’t in- 
tend to give up easily. They undoubtedly 
will use every trick in the bag in an 
effort to wield their waning power as 
long as possible. 

If they follow the pattern established 
by the ousted United Electrical Workers, 
the NLRB and the courts will be busy 
for a long time handling cases involving 
the CIO and former CIO unions. 

T he AMERICAN Communist Party — a 
direct arm of the Russian group which 
has been hurling insults at, and waging 
“cold” war against the U. S. — knows it 
will be sneered at by comrades through- 
out the world if it loses its foothold in 
the U. S. labor movement. 

And it is rapidly losing that foothold. 

The party has been thoroughly dis- 
credited, insofar as the vast majority of 
U. S. unionists is concerned. 

The voice of its stooges in the CIO has 
dropped to a weak whisper. 


Unfortunately, there are still small 
groups of non-Communist unionists who 
have been unwilling to act decisively 
against their Commie leaders. 

There are other small groups which to 
date have been unable to free themselves 
from the Red snare although they have 
tried. 

I AST NOVEMBER the CIO created and 
■■ set in motion machinery designed to 
free the organization of Communist in- 
fluences. 

That machinery has been operating as 
rapidly as circumstances permitted. 

It could be speeded up considerably if 
every non-Communist CIO member in the 
nation would put a bit of extra effort into 
the drive against the Reds. 

Those campaigns in the shops, in the 
local unions, in the city and state indus- 
trial union councils are just as important 
as the campaign being waged nationally 
by Philip Murray and other CIO leaders. - 

The quicker the job is co-mpleted thg 
better. Let’s all pitch in and get it over 
with as soon as possible. 


Silly Reasoning 

There’s a ridiculous rumor making the rounds. It goes this 
way: 

‘The unions would rather have the Taft-Hartley Act as a 
political issue for the 1950 elections than to get rid of the law 
now. That’s why there’s no big drive for repeal of the act,” 

That’s a silly reason. 

T-H will be a major issue in the 1950 elcetions because the 
longer labor lives under T-H the more fed up it gets with the 
law. 

The unions fought enactment of the law. They didn’t like 
it before it was passed. They like it less the longer they see it 
operate. They made a real fight for its repeal — a fight that 
failed, temporarily. 

They didn’t give up the battle. They merely shifted erripha- 
sis. They decided to fight on two fronts instead of one. 

On Front No. 1, the unions are seeking to get the present 
Congress to repeal T-H. 

On Front No. 2, they’re engaging in political activity de- 
signed to get the type of Congress that will repeal T-H — if the 
present one doesn’t do the job. 

But we don’t know of a single union which wouldn’t trade 
a good issue in the fall campaigns for repeal of T-H today. 

Let’s make no mistake about that. 

And don’t let any of the “experts” who write for the daily 
papers and the magazines sell you the line that “labor has 
found after operating under the Taft-Hartley Act that it isn’t 
nearly as bad as they said it would be when unions were fight- 
ing its enactment.” 





Congress of Industrial Organizations 


Philip Murray, President James B. Carey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vice Presidents: Joseph A. Beirne, L S. Buckmaster, Joseph Curran, 
John Green, Allan S. Haywood, O. A. Knight, Walter P. 
Reuther, Emil Rieve, Frank Rosenblum. 

Allan L Swim, Editor and Publicity Director 

Assistant Publicity Director: Henry C. Fteisher 
Assistant Editors: Hoiiace Ransdell, Fred Ross, Arthur Riordan, (On Leave), 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark, William Weiss, Gervase N. Love 

Editorial Office, 718 Jackson Place, N. W., Washington 6, D. (X 

Entered as Second Class Matter, Post Office, Washington, 0. C» 

Under the Act of Aug. 2A, 1912 and Feb 28. 1925. 

Vol. XIII February 20, 1950 No. 8 

^ THG CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 20, mo 


World Changes, Not Memphis Cops 


By BOB CHRISTOFFERSON 

igiEMPHIS POLICE are still 
hard on pickets — and news- 
papermen ! 

I’ve heard about what used to 
happen to union people and news- 
papermen in Boss Crump’s town. 
Take it from me. those things 
still happen! 

I came to Memphis from Bir- 
mingham Feb. 14, as a CIO public- 
ity man to help in the strike by 
the United Steelworkers against 
the American Snuff Co., 

Ten minutes after being taken 
out to the picket line by USA 
District Director Bill Crawford 
I ran into trouble with the Mem- 
phis police. They grabbed a film 
holder and film from me after 
stopping me from taking pictures 
of a woman picket who had been 
arrested. 

The woman had been placed in 
a squad car after officers had 
arrested her, allegedly for curs- 
ing strikebreakers. I walked up 
to the side of the car to photo- 
graph her. Just as I snapped the 
picture, a burly police lieutenant 
came up behind me and grabbed 
my camera. 

H olding on to it, I protested 
he couldn’t do 'that to me, 
that I had a right to take the 
picture. He told me I couldn’t 
take it and started walking me 
and the camera across the street 
to a police inspector. 

When we got there, I removed 
the loaded film holder from the 
camera and started to hand it 
to Crawford. The police lieuten- 
ant grabbed it and put it in his 
pocket. I protested that the hold- 
er contained two pictures made 
in Birmingham and that I didn’t 
want them ruined by improper 
handling. 

I had more film, but without 
the holder the camera was of 
no use. Crawford and I left the 
picket line to drive in to town 
to purchase another holder, and 
while we were gone police ar- 
rested 12 more women pickets 
and loaded them into a waiting 
patrol wagon. 

Crawford and I called on Po- 
lice Chief Claude Armour at his 
office in City Hall that afternoon 
to ask for the equipment. 

We asked him why the police 
interfered when I too-k the pic- 
ture. He gave these reasons: 

1. His officers took the equip- 


ment “to protect ourselves” be- 
cause they felt the picture was 
taken to “embarrass” the police 
department by making the police 
appear as “strikebreakers.” 

2. The equipment was taken in 
order to “protect” the prisoner in 
their custody from publicity. 

3. Police don’t care how many 
pictures are made of them, but 
they don’t permit pictures of 
prisoners in their custody. 

The chief admitted I had bro- 
ken no law, but said there were 
“certain rules” they followed in 
“protecting prisoners.” 

Asked about taking pictures of 
officers arresting pickets and 
loading them into the patrol wag- 
on, the chief said police would 
not try to prohibit that if the pho- 
tographer did not “run up and 
try to take a picture of the 
prisoners inside the wagon.” 

R RMOUR SAID the police were 
just trying to do their duty, 
and both the union and the com- 
pany accused them of partiality. 

Crawford pointed out that a 
woman commercial photographer 
hired by the company had not 
been molested, although she had 
been taking pictures of squad 
cars, arrests and other scenes at 
the picket line. Armour said the 
difference was that she had not 
gone right up to a police car 
to take pictures but had been 
taking pictures “at a distance.” 


The lieutenant who stopped us 
told the chief at that point that 
he would have stopped the com- 
pany’s photographer had she at- 
tempted to take a picture as I 
did. 

After ^debating with himself 
about it, the chief gave me my 
equipment back. 

The police lieutenant who took 
my film holder told me later that 
I’d have to quit taking pictures 
in Memphis until after I got a 
“photographer’s license.” When I 
took this matter up with the 
police chief he said there was no 
such thing as a “photographer's 
license” in Memphis. 

RESPITE his statement that po- 
^ lice are trying to do their 
duty without partiality, Memphis 
CIO members take a different 
view of their activities in con- 
nection with the strike. 

The day after ^police grabbed 
my camera equipment, the ex- 
ecutive board of the Memphis 
CIO Council heard a report from 
a committee named to investigate 
incidents that have occurred dup- 
ing the strike, and ado-pted a 
statement that declared the strik- 
ers have not received fair play 

The statement asserted that po- 
lice have arrested pickets on flim- 
sy excuses but have failed to ap- 
rest strikebreakers when there 
was ample evidence to justify 
arrests. 



^*Now don’t take this layoff so hard, Jamieson. After all, you 
do want to see a younger man get a start in life.” 


He Staged A Quick 
And Convincing 
Election 

H e was a trade unionist of the 
“old school” and he didn’t like 
to deal with what he called “legal tech- 
nicalities.” 

He usually did his record keeping on 
the backs of old envelopes, and getting 
him to make a written report was a ma- 
jor accomplishment. ' 

He thought the Wagner Act was a won- 
derful thing until he learned that it 
would require him to deal in “legal tech- 
nicalities” and engage in elections. 

“To heck with it,” he said. “Those elec- 
tions are a lot of bother. There are sim- 
pler ways of showing the boss a majority 
of his employes want to have a union.” 

T his unionist, a field representative 
whom we shall call Hank, soon found 
himself all tangled up in what he con- 
sidered useless red tape. 

His union was using the procedures set 
up by the National Labor Relations Board 
and was insisting that he do likewise. 

Finally — and reluctantly — he learned how» 
to file a petition for NLRB certification, 
how to seek a consent election, a card 
check “and all that other crazy stuff” 
that went with modernized management- 
labor relations. 

But he didn’t like it. 

He would argue and cajole and do any- 
thing else he could think of to avoid go- 
ing through the formality of an election, 
“It seems useless to me to go through 
all that monkey business when you know 
the plant is organized and the guys really 
want a union,” he would say. 

A new plant employing about 100 
production workers moved into Hank’s 
town and Hank soon started talking un- 
ionism to the employes. 

He learned, to his delight, that more 
than half of production force had be- 
longed to unions and that he had a cou- 
ple of “red hot” volunteer organizers 
among them. 

In a couple of weeks about 80% of the 
men had signed union application cards. 
Within the next two or three weeks the 
percentage jumped to about 96. 

Hank went to the manager’s office, in- 
troduced himself and said, “I’ve got more 
than 95% of the fellows out in the plant 
signed up. I’d like for you to recognize 
the union and then set down soon and be- 
gin negotiating with us.” 

r DS PLANT manager, courteously but 
firmly, told Hank that he wouldn’t 
deal with the union until he was con- 
vinced that it represented a majority of 
the employes. 

Hank knew that the manager’s next 
step would be to ask for NLRB certifica- 
tion through the somewhat lengthy elec- 
tion procedure. 

Hank jumped up from his chair sudden- 
ly, flashed a big smile and said, “Say, I’ve 
got a bright idea about getting this thing 
settled without a lot of argument and de- 
lay. I’ve got to run along now. I’ll see 
you tomorrow.” 

Hank shook hands with the manager — 
then briskly walked out of the ofidce, leav- 
ing a bewildered man behind him. 

■ SANK RETURNED the next day, still 
■■ in a jovial mood, and told the man- 
ager, “If all you want is real proof that 
the union represents a majority of your 
employes I can provide it in a couple of 
minutes.” 

He took the manager by the arm and 
led him from his oflice to the production 
room. In his deep, loud voice he shouted: 

“Gentlemen, we’re going to have a new 
type of election here today. Every man 
who’s in favor of my union will leave the 
plant, walk across the street, sit down on 
the curb for one minute, return to his job 
and work like hell the rest of the day so 
We won’t be accused of interfering with 
production. 

EJvery worker in the plant — not just 
96% — walked out! In a few minutes they 
were all back at their machines. 

“You win,” said the manager. A. L. S. 


FOUR DOWN . . . .' 



Another 80 th Congress Economic 


E lection of another Congress such 
as came into control in 1946 would be 
an “economic H-Bomb” for the United 
States, CIO President Philip Murray told 
the Executive Board in a fiery off-the-cuff 
speech preceding action on a resolution 
of support to the CIO Political Action 
Committee. 

Murray reviewed the actions of the 80th 
“worst” Congress, including passage of 
the Taft-Hartley law. He pointed out 
that the reactionary majority in that Con- 
gress was elected by far less than a ma- 
jority of the voters and urged all CIO af- 
filiates to get every member registered 
and to the polls. 

■ IE DERIDED those who say that labor 
■■ has a purge list of Congressmen. 


There is a lot of talk about labor being 
against this candidate or that candidate 
and going out to “get” him, Murray said. 

Actually, it is not important whether 
this or that individual Congressman or po- 
litical party is elected. What labor is for 
is a liberal, forv^ard-looking Congress, and 
what it is against is reactionary thinking 
on Capitol Hill. Labor will work for can- 
didates who back the liberal program and 
will try to defeat those who do not. 

The resolution, adopted unanimously, de- 
clared that “the issue is not loose charges 
of ‘socialism.’ It is progress or reaction.” 

The Board instructed PAC to redouble 
its efforts to mobilize the political forces 
of labor “and all other groups with simi- 
lar aims and aspirations” for the 1950 


H-Bomb — Murray 

campaign, and called on all CIO affiliates 
to “give without stint of their energies 
and physical and financial ' resources to 
the election of candidates pledged to a 
program of progress.” 

T he board “declares its faith in the 
wisdom and good judgment of the 
American people and expresses the belief 
that reaction wins only when a majority 
of the people neglect their duties of citi- 
zenship and fail to vote,” the resolution 
(yjntinued. 

“The Board therefore declares that the 
primary political action duty of all CIO 
affiliates is the registration to vote of 
each of their members, their families and 
their neighbors, and it directs all CIO af- 
filiates to take immediate steps to secure 
this 100% reg^tration. 

“It further directs (1) intensification of 
the program of informing all voters on the 
issues before them and of the records of 
the candidates on those issues, and (2) a 
maximum effort on election day to insure 
that all registered voters cast their ballots. 

“The 1950 political campaign has begun. 
It is a call to good citizenship for each 
member of the CIO.” 

The CIO-PAC Executive Board held a 
dinner meeting Feb. 15 to work over de- 
tails of the campaign. 

‘No Strike’ Law Stays 

Bills seeking repeal of the New York 
state law setting up penalties for public 
employes who strike were killed by. the 
labor committee of the Assembly. The 
law, known as the Condon-Waslin act, was 
enacted four years ago as a result of e 
teachers’ strike in Buffalo. 


Unexpected But Welcome Guest 

As the CIO-PAC Executive Board was getting ready to start its dinner meeting 
at a Washington hotel, Feb.-J^4, a handsome young-appearing man came up and joined 
the group, nodding recognition here and there and looking extremely affable. 

“Hello Phil,” he said to CIO Pres. Murray. “Hope I’m in the right place.’' 

“Well,” Murray replied, smiling, “I doubt if you are, but we’d be glad to have 
you stay with us.” 

“I’d probably have a better time here than I would where I’m supposed to be,” 
the gentleman replied, “but I’m afraid they might miss me.” With which he took his 
polite departure. 

It was Eric Johnson, former President of the U. S. Chamber of Commerce and now 
“czar” of the movie industry. 

During the labor-management conference of 1946, he had made a number of 
friends among the labor leaders present, and on several occasions had differed with the 
other management representatives to the point where one disgruntled C. of C. member 
commented: “Eric should get over on the labor side of the table — ^he doesn’t belong * 
with us.” 


N 


THE CIO NEWS, FEBRUARY 20, 1960 


5 




4 CP-Dominated Unions Expelled; 
Mine, Mill Now, 3 Others March 1st 


By HENKY C. FLEISHER 

T hey had heard the charges, and the 
supporting statements, and the de- 
fense. 

And last week, members of the GIO 
Executive Board brought in their de- 
cision on four national unions. 

The verdict, voted overwhelmingly by the 
CIO Board: “Guilty/’ by reason of consist- 
ent, unwavering support of the policies of 
the Communist Party. 

The decision: Expulsion from the ranks of 
the CIO. 

For the Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, 
the verdict took effect at once. 

For the Public Workers, the Office & Pro- 
fessional Workers, the Food, Tobacco & 
Agricultural Workers, the expulsion takes 
effect March 1, as a result of procedures in- 
volved in efforts by the unions to enjoin 
the CIO. 

The reports — brought to the Board by two 
ieparate committees — found the same pat- 
tern of day-by-day Communist control dom- 
inating all four unions. 

1 . MINE-MILL: “The committee therefore 
concludes not only that the policies of the 
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers Union follow 
the Communist Party line, but also that they 
follow that line because the Communist 
Party is in direct control of the union’s lead- 
ership, and dictates to that leadership the 
policies it shall adopt.*’ 

*. OFFICE & PROFESSIONAL WORK- 
ERS: “The policies and activities of the 
UOWPA followed and continue to follow ex- 
actly, without deviation, the program of the 
Communist Party. . . . Never in the history 
of the UOPWA has any policy ever been 
adopted which in any way runs counter to 
the policies of the Communist Party, or to 
the interests of the Soviet Union, as those 
Interests are reflected in the program of the 
Communist Party.” 

#. FOOD, TOBACCO & AGRICULTURAL 
WORKERS: “It is abundantly clear that 
the FTA consistently follows the Communist 
Party line. The record is plain that wher- 
ever the needs of the Communist Party 
and the Soviet Union dictate, the leadership 
of the FTA is always willing to sacrifice 
the needs of the workers in that industry 
and organized labor in America as a whole.” 

4 . UNITED PUBLIC WORKERS: “On the 
basis of all the evidence presented to it, 
the committee unanimously concludes that 
the policies and activities of the UPWA are 
consistently directed toward the achieve- 
ment o<f the program and the purposes of 
the Communist Party rather than the ob- 
jectives and policies set forth in the CIO 
Constitution. . . . 

**The UPWA has never adopted any policy 
which in any way ran counter to the policies 
of the Communist Party.” 

T he REPORTS offered a unique study 
of Communist policy by leading Ameri- 
can trade unionists. 

As the committee said in the UOPWA 
case, “since the charge against the UOPWA 
was that it pursues the program and pur- 
poses of the Communist Party, the commit- 
tee was necessarily required to give consid- 


Hefe’s a quick summary of CIO moves 
against Communist-dominated unions. 

1. Nov. 2, 1949: CIO amended constitu- 
tion to provide expulsion of Communist- 
dominated unions; expelled United Electrical 
and Farm Equipment unions. 

2. Nov. 5, 1949: Charges of Communist 
domination filed against 10 unions at CIO 
Executive Board meeting in Cleveland. 

3. Nov. 5, 1949: Pres. Murray names 

three committees to hear charges, evidence 
and testimony against accused unions. 

4. Dec. 19, 1949-Feb 6, 1950: Two CIO 
committees hear cases involving four unions. 

5. Feb. 15-16: CIO Executive Board gets 
recommendations from committees urging ex- 


CIO To Organize 
Four Jurisdictions 

No announcement has yet been made as 
to what steps will be taken by CIO in the 
jurisdictions left vacant by the expulsion 
of the four uiTions. 

But CIO Pres. Murray told news report- 
ers that plans will soon be made public. 
The Board has authorized CIO’s executive 
officers to take necessary actions for organ- 
ization of those jurisdictions. 


eration to the policies of the Communist 
Party.” 

The basic thesis of that party, the com- 
mittee said, is the creation of revolution 
and the “dictatorship of the proletariat,” 
presumably as steps toward a “new order 
of society.” 

“Because of this basic thesis,” the report 
said, “Communist philosophy has always 
been predicated upon the use of trade unions 
as an instrument pf Communist policy and as 
a weapon by which the party could organ- 
ize the working classes and bring nearer 
the revolution from which the dictatorship 
of the party would emerge.” 

The committee noted a famous remark by 
Lenin, father of the Russian revolution and 
the writer of much Communist theory: 

“/f w necessary to agree to any and every 
sacrifice ... to resort to all sorts of devices, 
maneuvers and illegal methods, to evasion 
and subterfuge, in order to penetrate the 
trade unions, to remain in them, and to 
carry o